7 Ounce External Frame Pack
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Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
7 Ounce External Frame Pack on 11/13/2012 13:34:33 MST Print View

Here's the latest test version of my myog external frame pack.




here


here

here

I've been fiddling with this basic design for 15 years or so. I started with a 5 lb MSR external frame pack and kept reducing weight while maintaining function and capacity. I've posted other versions here before.

The pack in the photos weighs about 6.8 ounces (pack, frame, full suspension waist belt and shoulder straps) and has a back bag capacity of about 4000 cubic inches. Stuff can also be lashed to the top bar and a front bag can be added. So the potential capacity can be increased to the 6000-7000 cubic inch range. I'll be testing it over the winter with daily trips to the gym and grocery store. I routinely carry 30 lbs or less but have carried 40 lbs in/on previous versions.

The pack can be taken apart and put back together without tools in a few minutes. Here is a group shot of the components prior to assembly. Left to right: (1)vertical frame spars (Skyshark 300s)=1 ounce (2) Shoulder straps and top bar of frame=2 ounces (3) waist belt = 2.1 ounces (4) Back bag = 1.7 ounces Total Ounces = 6.8.

here

Here are individual shots of items 2-4.

(2) Shoulder Pads and Top Bar=2 ounces

here

(3) Waist Belt = 2.1 ounces

here

(4) Back Bag =1.7 ounces
Back bag is a simple flat bag 26" wide X 30" tall) made from Thru Hiker's Momentum 50 fabric.

here

Edited by lyrad1 on 06/02/2013 10:14:15 MDT.

d k
(dkramalc) - MLife
Re: 7 Ounce External Frame Pack on 11/13/2012 14:00:54 MST Print View

Looks like you've updated the connections from the top bar to the side spars. What are you using there now?

I'd also love to see more detail on how the side spars connect to the waist belt.

I like that you keep refining this pack. By the time I finally get around to trying one myself, you should have it perfected ;)

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Re: 7 Ounce External Frame Pack on 11/13/2012 15:07:10 MST Print View

dk,


"Looks like you've updated the connections from the top bar to the side spars. What are you using there now?"

Photo below shows the latest incarnation of my top corner connections. The larger diameter tubing is a wrapped Skyshark. The smaller diameter ferrule is .24 inch od pultruded carbon fiber tubing. Barbed fitting is 3/8" od. The id of the fitting is too small for the Skyshark to enter. The od of barbed fittings is specified. The id is variable, depending on the maker. I think the one shown is from McMaster-Carr.

here

"I'd also love to see more detail on how the side spars connect to the waist belt."

Photos below shows how they are connected. A Skyshark end cap from Kitebuilder.com is simply tied to a webbing loop on the the waist belt (see small hole in end cap) and the bottom of the Skyshark is inserted.

here

here

here

here

Neither of these newer ideas are well tested. Time will tell.

Edited by lyrad1 on 11/13/2012 15:19:38 MST.

Samuel C. Farrington
(scfhome) - M

Locale: Chocorua NH, USA
7 Ounce External Frame Pack on 11/13/2012 21:57:14 MST Print View

Great idea to use the PVC or ABS plumbing T's at the top corners.
Still on the cutting edge of the ultimate ultralight pack.

Ummm - What do you use for a rain cover over the M50?

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
7 Ounce External Frame Pack on 11/13/2012 22:04:53 MST Print View

Looks to me that the center of balance is still way away from your body so negating the weight advantage.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: 7 Ounce External Frame Pack on 11/13/2012 22:41:24 MST Print View

Can't help but notice Enstrom's "Grace" on the wall behind you.
Though I'm not a religious man, I've always loved that image.

Reminds me somewhat of Caravaggio's "St. Jerome in Meditation"

1

Sorry...carry on.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: 7 Ounce External Frame Pack on 11/14/2012 08:04:53 MST Print View

Samuel,

"Ummm - What do you use for a rain cover over the M50?"

I put sleeping bag, dry clothes, and anything else I want to keep dry in a trash compactor bag. I don't use a pack cover. I just let the rain run through and out. I switched to non-waterproof pack fabric many years ago. I guess you could call me a maverick.

Come to think of it I think Kelty used to make packs out of uncoated nylon.

Edited by lyrad1 on 11/14/2012 09:05:09 MST.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: 7 Ounce External Frame Pack on 11/14/2012 08:30:17 MST Print View

Franco,

"Looks to me that the center of balance is still way away from your body so negating the weight advantage"

The photo probably says more about me than the pack. I have a very curved back (think turtle) and, for me, all packs tend to lean backwards like you see in the photo. I typically use a front bag which moves the center of balance forward so there is no backward pull. To address this problem with my old MSR pack I would carry heavy things near the top and then let the pack tip forward a bit to move the center of gravity forward. With any pack I typically attach webbing to the top corners of the pack frame and use them as arm rests in the front of my body. That pulls the pack forward and balances things better. I'm probably not the best person to be modeling backpacks. I think I'll go back to modeling lingerie.

My wife and friend also use packs I made for them (same basic model) but have straighter backs and don't have my problem. See photos below.

same

here

My wife just returned from Nepal and she used her myog pack so I can now say this pack has gone to the Everest base camp. (whoop t doo)

Here's another photo of me, with front bag, and things more in balance.

same

Edited by lyrad1 on 11/14/2012 09:06:18 MST.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Re: 7 Ounce External Frame Pack on 11/14/2012 09:03:07 MST Print View

Bucktoof,

That picture is often in my photos and is often commented on. Seems to be very popular. My wife's parents bought it many years ago because they liked it and their last name was Enstrom. Also strikes me as similar to the one you posted.

Samuel C. Farrington
(scfhome) - M

Locale: Chocorua NH, USA
CG on 11/14/2012 20:48:55 MST Print View

If you wanted to, you could add a couple horizontal cinch straps to pull the weight more forward. That you haven't says to me the CG has not been an issue.

Oh yes, the compactor bag in the pack. Didn't think of that. Thanks.

Mark Dijkstra
(Markacd) - F
Some day on 11/15/2012 09:50:06 MST Print View

I will make a pack like this for myself. I need to finish my tent first though. A sleeping bag is also a little higher on the list as well.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Some day on 11/15/2012 10:19:28 MST Print View

Mark,

I've made tents and packs. This pack is way easier than a tent. I've tried to keep it easy to construct and the process easily breaks down into simple, independent steps. The main parts are made separately and then everything is lashed together at the end. For experimenting it is very easy to swap waist belt, bag, vertical spars, shoulder straps, etc. So you can make one part at a time and use any existing waist belts, bags, shoulder pads, etc. you might have until you can get around to making new ones. In other words you can approach the project incrementally.

I haven't made a sleeping bag but I'm guessing it is more difficult than either a tent or a pack.

So after you finish the sleeping bag it will be all down hill for you difficulty wise.

Mark Dijkstra
(Markacd) - F
projects on 11/16/2012 15:12:44 MST Print View

That may very well be, but I have a backpack which I'm, for the time being, very happy with. I'm already working on the tent, so that one needs to be finished first and I need a new sleeping bag. My current bag is far too cold for where I usually take it and my other bag is too small and narrow. So it's not only what I want to make, but also what I need which determines my priorities.

Jeremy Platt
(jeremy089786) - F

Locale: Sydney
Nice on 11/19/2012 20:57:40 MST Print View

Hey Darryl,

Great design, very stripped back and minimalist. I especially like the ability to add front pockets without adding the complexity of other front pocket packs.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Nice on 11/20/2012 08:39:13 MST Print View

Jeremy,

Yes, front packs are very easy to add. You can hang or clip whatever you want from the top corners of the frame and let it hang in front of you. Adding a tether of some sort from the front bag to the two vertical spars of the frame keeps the front bag from swinging when you lean forward. A typical front bag, depending on size and materials, need not weigh much more than 1 ounce.

You can also turn your windbreaker into a front bag. Here's one way to do it:
here