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Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Can you id this? on 11/08/2012 07:39:55 MST Print View

I have a plastic rod that is about 1/8" in diameter and about 8 feet long. I got it at a surplus store many years ago. The clerk said it had been part of a pop-up tent of some sort. It is very stiff yet pliable. I think it would work as a bivy hoop or maybe a rounded top for a tent like the Mountain Hardware Hoopla.

But what is it made of.......nylon, delrin, flubber? Any clues?

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here

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Green Thumb
(greenthumb)
Upholstery on 11/08/2012 07:50:14 MST Print View

It looks sort of like the piping that they put in the trim of upholstery.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Upholstery on 11/08/2012 08:46:16 MST Print View

Green Thumb,

I do recall seeing that stuff where old furnture has worn spots. I think the stuff I have is much stiffer than that but without a piece of it in my hand I can't be sure.

Daryl

Paul McLaughlin
(paul) - MLife
Re: Can you id this? on 11/08/2012 19:10:20 MST Print View

If you have enough of it that yu can sacrifice some, and the ability to measure the temperature you could try melting a piece and then look up the melting points of various possible plastics. Or, take it down to your nearest TAP plastics store and see if they can identify it.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Re: Can you id this? on 11/08/2012 20:08:47 MST Print View

Paul,

TAP plastics?

There's one just down the hill from me.

Never been there.

Oh boy, a field trip.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Can you id this? on 11/09/2012 15:45:54 MST Print View

My suspicion is that it could be a nylon.
I doubt it would be Delrin, but not impossible.
It could also be a polyethylene or similar.
It could be glass-reinforced, possibly/maybe, as it looks a bit stiff. Try cutting 5 mm off the end and see what happens.

Yes, melting point would help, or accurate density if you can measure the weight and diameter accurately. If you do the measurements I may be able to convert them into material. I have tables.

Cheers

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Can you id this? on 11/09/2012 16:13:35 MST Print View

Roger, you never cease to amaze me.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Re: Re: Can you id this? on 11/09/2012 19:04:54 MST Print View

+1 on Tad's comment.

Samuel C. Farrington
(scfhome) - M

Locale: Chocorua NH, USA
ID this on 11/09/2012 23:12:01 MST Print View

Daryl,
My money's on fiberglass.
If so, a sharp utility knife blade applied near an end should show the fibers.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: ID this on 11/10/2012 01:54:26 MST Print View

> My money's on fiberglass.
Yeah, that too is very possible. You will find out fast if you try to trim the end!

Cheers

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Re: ID this on 11/10/2012 11:03:57 MST Print View

Samuel and Roger,

I did the end trimming experiment you suggested and I'd say it is fiberglass. When snipped the end tended to crush and form a mini shaving brush. It makes sense to me because the stiffness feels like fiberglass. I was initally thrown off because it looks white and shiny like nylon.

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here

Roger,

I also took the measurements if you want to see how it comes out on your charts. However, at this point, I have little doubt about it being fiberglass.

Length =2590.8mm (about 102 inches)
Diameter = 3.12mm (about 1/8")
Weight = 38.2 grams

Thanks to all the detectives for the help.

Edited by lyrad1 on 11/10/2012 11:05:29 MST.

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: Re: Re: ID this on 11/10/2012 11:48:26 MST Print View

Yeah, it looks like a plastic of some sort with fiberglass embedded. This was especially common amungst tool manufatcurors(Makita, Milwalukee, etc) about 20 years ago. Nowdays, it is mostly just plastics they use.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: ID this on 11/10/2012 13:20:16 MST Print View

Hi Daryl

The density (~1.93 g/cc) is too high to be any common plastic. The ends are dead set for fibreglass though. And yes, the stuff has been used for that sort of thing.

Just a suggestion: be a little careful when you cut it: the fine glass can be an irritant. If you want to be really safe, cut with a fine hacksaw with water flowing over it. Or just do it outside with the dust blowing away from you.

Cheers

Samuel C. Farrington
(scfhome) - M

Locale: Chocorua NH, USA
ID this on 11/10/2012 17:21:15 MST Print View

A mini cut-off saw, widely available, has a thin 2" circular blade that is good for FG and Carbon. OK for ALU also, but dulls quickly with that.

Amazon now has a beefier 3" blade cut off saw for around $70, or twice the price of the mini, that takes both composite blades like those used on arrow saws that are 1/32" thin, or carbide tripped blades that are 1/8" thin. The carbide tipped ones have less teeth, so might do some tearing. On the other hand, the arrow saw composite blades come with a warning about shattering. That's why I always liked the 2" metal blades on the little saw, but it is on the anemic side. Maybe it's time to take another look at saws.

Also, good quality fine particle masks are not hard to find. Carbon fiber has a distinct odor when cut without using a mask - a good warning signal.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
I ordered some on 11/11/2012 08:36:25 MST Print View

So, assuming this is fiberglass, I ordered some 1/16 and 1/8 diameter pieces to compare and play with. Only $2 each for 4 foot long pieces.

Thanks for the safety and cutting tips.