Exaggerated pack weights????
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Craig Nadeau
(TacticalMountain) - MLife
Exaggerated pack weights???? on 11/07/2012 10:35:26 MST Print View

Okay, here is a pet peeve on mine - maybe someone can shoot me down and straighten me out.

How is it that on a 6 day WestCoast Trail trip I had on a 40# pack. I was not even trying to be light. I had about 2# more food than I needed, I carried the whole 2 man tent, I had my cell phone with me and a solar charger. I even carried the cooking gear. My wives pack was 30#. We had umbrellas and a water filter. I had 2 bear bags. I wasn't carrying an extra sleeping bag, firewood or a cast iron pan.

So when I hear stories about hikers with 65# packs or even 75# packs, what in the world are people finding to put into their packs? I think like so many things in life we love to exaggerate size and weight. One lady we were with was completely convinced that her pack was over 45# and she told everyone just that. I lifted it once for her and it was certainly not 45#.

Well from now on if anyone asks I only carry either an 8# pack or a 75# pack....

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Exaggerated pack weights???? on 11/07/2012 11:05:49 MST Print View

"So when I hear stories about hikers with 65# packs or even 75# packs, what in the world are people finding to put into their packs?"

It all adds up:

Heavier Big 3: pack, tent, sleeping bag
Heavier sleeping pads and ground cloths
More and heavier clothes, lots of spares, camp shoes
Big cook pots, heavier stoves, more eating gear like a cup, bowl, plate, knife/fork/spoon, gadgets like French press coffee makers, heavy grills, salt and pepper shakers
Big filters-- like a First Need at 16oz vs a Sawyer at 3oz, heavy water bottles
More toys: binoculars, SLR cameras, tripods, radios
Tools: hatches, axes, saws, shovels, multi-tools, large knives, machetes, big flashlights
Full bottles of insect repellent, sunscreen, soap, etc
Big first aid kits
Heavy food items and excess water
Camp chairs
Big rope bundles
Poly tarps (in addition to tents)

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: Exaggerated pack weights???? on 11/07/2012 11:26:13 MST Print View

Golf cart

Mary D
(hikinggranny) - MLife

Locale: Gateway to Columbia River Gorge
"Exaggerated pack weights???? on 11/07/2012 13:08:44 MST Print View

While I wonder how anyone could end up with as much as 40 lbs. for a 6-day trip. My pack for 6 days (solo) is half that. On the other hand, back in the 1980's I was staggering around the North Cascades under a 50 lb. pack. It's all relative! We take what we think we need.

Daniel Russell
(Superfluous_Grizzly)

Locale: Creation
Its definitely possible.... on 11/07/2012 13:33:59 MST Print View

This is my buddy (he has never heard of UL backpacking) on a 3 day trip, yes 3-day! He is 6'1"
210lbs for reference of how gigantic his pack was. I felt overpacked with my 35 liter pack that ended up weighing 18lbs with my food. I'd say his weight right around 65-60lbs and he had a smaller backpack on his chest. Temps around 20f at night.

.

Edited by Superfluous_Grizzly on 11/07/2012 13:35:44 MST.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Exaggerated pack weights???? on 11/07/2012 14:20:29 MST Print View

> what in the world are people finding to put into their packs?
Well, 50 m of climbing rope, a full rack of pro, ...
2 weeks food, a very large machete ...
Been there, done that - it was 70 lbs at the start.

Cheers

Philip Delvoie
(PhilipD) - MLife

Locale: Ontario, Canada
Exaggerated pack weights????" on 11/07/2012 14:28:38 MST Print View

Daniel,

Love that picture of your buddy with the pack....impressive load that is for sure. I cringed when I noticed his footwear choice with that monster. Hopefully he had steaks and beer tucked away in there somewhere.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Exaggerated pack weights????" on 11/07/2012 15:35:40 MST Print View

Note the extra shoes tucked in the side. I hurt just looking at that setup.

What in the world did he have in there? Is that a Stanely builder's level hanging out the front?

Edited by dwambaugh on 11/07/2012 15:36:46 MST.

Jay Wilkerson
(Creachen) - MLife

Locale: East Bay
Exaggerated Pack Weights??? on 11/07/2012 16:00:23 MST Print View

6478
Come on Man! Look at all of his stuff...

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Easy... on 11/07/2012 16:08:27 MST Print View

Are we talking about nowadays or times past?

When I first started backpacking it was not uncommon for people to do 14 day trips without re-supply. And 2 lbs per day of food was not considered too much. Add a couple quarts of water and you have 32 lbs right there.

Now add a 20 lb base weight (some folks consider this "lightweight"), and you are at 52 lbs.

BTW, I think 40 lbs for 6 days is heavy unless you need to carry a gallon of water in the desert :)

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
Re: Exaggerated Pack Weights??? on 11/07/2012 16:54:44 MST Print View

@Daniel,

Seriously? Your friend needs help in a bad way. I wouldn't even step foot onto the trail with him had I been in your position. In light of that recent article going around musing on the current state of "UL" validity, images like that of your friend make me cringe a bit. Obviously, his load is beyond heavy, it is is borderlining stupid. No, it is stupid. Five Finger shodded to top it off? Goodness...

I have to ask, was he proud of his ability to carry all that weight?

Raquel Rascal
(flutingaround)

Locale: Rocky Mtn. West
@Daniel on 11/07/2012 17:00:58 MST Print View

The entire thing is a mess! Ha ha...the jeans/cotton hoody around the waist/vibrams combo is a trip!

You should let your friend see this thread and the laughs we are having at his expense.

I'm so thankful for BPL.

Steven Paris
(saparisor) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
re: Exaggerated pack weights???? on 11/07/2012 17:02:35 MST Print View

Aside from the obvious weight of his pack, why is he wearing jeans and why does he have a sweatshirt/jacket wrapped around his waist, under his waistbelt?

We here at BPL can argue the finer points of merino vs. polyester, but anyone can buy at least basic nylon or polyester clothing and fleece at Target, WalMart, T J Maxx, Ross, etc. for cheap.

Doh! Raquel beat me to it!

Edited by saparisor on 11/07/2012 17:04:20 MST.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: re: Exaggerated pack weights???? on 11/07/2012 17:37:10 MST Print View

A whole generation backpacked with blue jeans and cotton T shirts. Guess someone forgot to tell them that "cotton kills."

;-)

Mike Bozman
(myarmisonfire) - M

Locale: BC
When I was on the WCT... on 11/07/2012 18:29:15 MST Print View

Beer. That is one reason that I found a lot of people have dang heavy packs on the WCT! Whether that adds up to an extra 20 pounds or not is debatable. Axes where another reason.

Nathan Stuart
(forest.)

Locale: Hunter Valley - Australia
spirit level on 11/07/2012 20:17:08 MST Print View

I have mates that lug huge packs, They just double up on things "just in case" that clearly they have never used. Apparently going bush means huge packs and no comfort, everything will break and you will die without backup. Also the comments on full bottles of this and that, yep, seen that. SLR's, big Bino's, large cheap synthetic sleeping bags rated to -20°C. Ah I just cringe.
Sad thing is a lot of the people I've crossed with huge packs are on a school trip and quite young. I'm sure it ends up there first and last backpacking trip. I know that's mentioned a lot on here.

Man I've seen some junk lugged bush but a spirit level ??? Man that's just funny.

Out of interest was it to get a hammock level or something ??

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Re: re: Exaggerated pack weights???? on 11/07/2012 20:40:54 MST Print View

I agree with Nick. Blue jeans are completely fine for backpacking if there is no precipitation. And rain pants solve that. They are also heard wearing and durable. Obviously there are much better options out there, but it's still fine.

I have seen some crazy heavy packs on bushcraft forums. Some people really love the old Alice packs, which are probably like 7 pounds. Then there are the old military sleep systems which can weigh up to 10 pounds for the winter set up. Then some people will pack large axes, which are only useful in cold/wet or winter conditions, in perfect weather. Some people will also carry multiple pieces of cookware, like 2 large pots and a large frying pan.

Alex Eriksson
(aeriksson) - M

Locale: Austin, TX
Re: Its definitely possible.... on 11/07/2012 20:57:19 MST Print View

I love that in the background there's a guy (forgive me if this is one of you) lookin' a bit portly, but who's carrying a pack small enough that you can't even see it peaking up over his shoulders. Ironically said guy will probably walk twice as fast and have just as enjoyable a time if not more so, carrying 1/3 the weight.

Seriously though, a builder's level?! That takes the cake. That even bests my girlfriend and buddy who each carry machetes in case of zombies (or in case I'm getting mauled and they figure they can fend off said big cat by accidentally lopping off one of my arms).

Btw I wish I were kidding about the zombies part...... it's endearing if nothing else, and hey the giggles I get seeing a lightweight Osprey pack with a machete lashed to the side, deep in the heart of Austin Texas's denses subtropical rain forests, weigh nothing.

Edited by aeriksson on 11/07/2012 21:57:49 MST.

Rob Lee
(roblee) - MLife

Locale: Southern High Plains
Re: Re: Its definitely possible, but.... on 11/08/2012 21:42:02 MST Print View

From 1969-75 we did a lot of mid-altitude Sierra trips of 5 days. External frames, Svea 123s, canteens, Lowa Alspitz boots, spinning reels, but only tube tents, very little water, and no filters. We always bemoaned our "50 pound" packs. Then one day we actually weighed them. The heaviest was 33 pounds. The only guy that got close was a Coca Cola junkie who wanted to make a statement by never buying non-returnable drink containers (the ban-the-can movement was popular in Sacto then). He took a 6 pack of bottled Coke into Desolation and, of course, packed out the empties. He didn't offer to share and we didn't offer to help carry.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Mostly laundry on 11/08/2012 21:52:11 MST Print View

0001111
These kids were out for the weekend. Short hike into established campground. Set up their tents and soon reappeared all redressed in sweats and fleece. Not so heavy, but does take up a huge amount of room along with that synthetic filled, flannel lined sleeping bag and a real pillow will put you into a pack like dudes above real quick. But everything is fully lofted looks like.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Re: Mostly laundry on 11/08/2012 22:10:43 MST Print View

I feel like I am going to show up to a group hike with traditional backpackers some day and the group leader is going to think I don't know what I am doing based on the size of my pack. And then I am going to be forced to pull everything out of my pack and show that I do, in fact, have the proper gear. And he will still look at me all befuddled.

I really think that the biggest obstacle to packing light for beginner backpackers are massive, cheap sleeping bags.

The weirdest packing job I ever saw was in Big Sur a couple weekends ago. Some guy had a very small backpack (the kind that mountain bikers use) and strapped to the bottom was a massive, at least 3 foot long tube stuff stack. I have no idea what was in that. I felt bad for his poor shoulders.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: Re: Mostly laundry on 11/08/2012 22:14:33 MST Print View

Hike solo and no one will ever question your pack -- we'll, maybe you will.

Jay Wilkerson
(Creachen) - MLife

Locale: East Bay
Exaggerated Pack Weights??? on 11/08/2012 22:25:16 MST Print View

4779
Back in the Day and big learning curve.. WOW!

a b
(Ice-axe)
Re: Exaggerated pack weights???? on 11/08/2012 22:27:31 MST Print View

When i was much younger I went with uncle Wayne on backpacking trips in the Sierra with friends.
We usually had a frozen Tri Tip steak for the first night out.
Just before we left one time he asked if beans would be good with our steak.
I said "sure"!
Then he loaded a 1 gallon can of backed beans into the top of my pack and said "Good, you can carry them."

Anyhow, here are a few pictures of impressive loads I have seen carried on trails.
More power to these people.. as long as i don't have to carry it!
."How far to the lake?"
."What no axe?.. oh wait.. there it is."
.The pack used on Mt Washington New Hampshire around the observatory.
.The "wear the pack backwards for easier access to the beer" approach
.Yes, this is me circa 2004. I was a heavy trucker too.
.
This last photo is me from 2004.
Seems only fair to lampoon myself as well.
My old Dana Designs pack weighed more empty than my entire base weight now.
.Clearly this sign was intended for "ultralighter" crossing only... look at the tiny packs!
.
Ultralighter crossing only? I mean, look at the tiny packs!

Scott Pickard
(gon2srf)

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: Exaggerated pack weights???? on 11/09/2012 14:36:56 MST Print View

The guy with boxes!!!! Great thread that is getting me through a rough day at work.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Re: Exaggerated pack weights???? on 11/09/2012 17:04:47 MST Print View

That load with boxes is typical of re-supply for remote staff operations. Some of those youngsters haul in 100 pound loads of fresh food and supplies. OUCH!

Scott Pickard
(gon2srf)

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: Re: Re: Exaggerated pack weights???? on 11/09/2012 19:02:11 MST Print View

Lol. Thought he was just being resourceful.

Doug Wolfe
(Wolfie2nd) - F
@ Roger Caffin on 11/15/2012 04:52:23 MST Print View

Dude no matter how you look at it there's no light weight way to do any alpine mountaineering. Everything about it is heavy rope,pro,crampons an axe.
But its still fun : )

Edited by Wolfie2nd on 11/15/2012 04:56:33 MST.

Ken Bennett
(ken_bennett) - F

Locale: southeastern usa
Re: Exaggerated pack weights???? on 11/18/2012 09:31:56 MST Print View

Easy -- the wrong stuff and too much of it. Fifteen years ago I was thrilled when I was able to get my base weight below 50 pounds. Seriously. For a weekend trip, I would have 48 pounds of base gear and a tiny 5-pound food bag. I weighed all this stuff, so it was accurate.

That included a 4.5 pound solo tent (which won a Backpacker Editor's Choice award and was three pounds lighter than my old solo tent.) It included a 2.5 pound Goretex shell, another 1.5 pounds of Goretex rain pants, a complete 200-wt fleece set, top and bottom, with nylon panels to keep the pack straps from shredding the fleece. All that was totally necessary to survive mild Eastern fall weather that might actually get below freezing! Probably another 4 pounds. A two pound stove and a 3-4 pound kitchen. A coated nylon 9x9 foot tarp for the kitchen, 2.5 pounds. A change of clothing for every day on the trail. A 4-pound synthetic 20-F bag that packed to the size of a large watermelon. A giant Thermarest. Multiple repair kits for everything - mattress, stove, pack. A giant fixed blade knife, plus a multitool. A military entrenching tool (seriously.) Extra batteries. A 2+ pound first aid kit. Binoculars. Heavy p+s camera along with spare batteries and film. All of this was carried in a Gregory pack that weighed almost seven pounds, plus I needed another pound+ of optional external pockets.

Remember, the wilderness is a nasty, brutish place where only the prepared can possibly survive....

Getting the pack weight down was a process of getting more experience and learning from other hikers. My three season base weight is now around 13-14 pounds depending on whether I am solo or with my wife. Makes the trips a lot more pleasant....

Stephen Barber
(grampa) - MLife

Locale: SoCal
Pack weights on 11/18/2012 10:20:32 MST Print View

Back in the day (from the 1970s through about 2008) I regularly weighed my full pack. If it weighed 45lbs or less, I thought I was carrying a light pack. Over 50lbs was normal.

Thank God for BPL!

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
nope on 11/19/2012 18:06:31 MST Print View

Packs at Philmont scout ranch go on the scale before leaving.
The average is 45-55 lbs
With only 3 days food at a time.
Philmont does require some extra stuff, but most newbs would bring more on their own anyway without the guidance they give.

I have a friend who told me he worked on getting his pack wt down and got excited once when he weighed his pack and it only weighed 23 lbs,.... then he realized he didnt have any food or water yet.

Jeff J
(j.j.81) - F

Locale: Oregon
Recurring theme on 11/25/2012 14:34:00 MST Print View

This thread is a recurring theme on BPL, for good reason. I am one of those people who started with a heavy pack, 40+ lbs, for a weekend trip as a middle schooler, but now my baseweight is at 8.5ish lbs. I fully credit my weight loss to BPL, not so much for changing my ways, but showing me other ways and gear.

I never packed extra clothes or shoes, but I had a white gas stove for August, full set of nesting pots instead of just one (I did use them all though), 7 lbs pack, 1.5 sleeping pad (which I still have and use 15 years later), fairly full FAK, multiple full water bottles, etc. It added up, and yes I weighed the pack on the bathroom scale. At the time, my dad had a 60 lbs pack because he "needed" two bucket sinks, camp shoes, a change of clothes, a towel for washing up, and so on.

We got that gear and the subsequent heavy packs by reading Backpacker mag and going to REI for help. Both well meaning resources, but heavy minded. BPL was the resource I wanted all those years ago. The last trip I went on with my dad was the first time he didn't say he was going to have a lighter pack next time, and we didn't wish for anything either.

I'm conflicted when I see these threads about heavier packs because on one hand, I've been there and now I've "seen the light," as it's been said. I, too, cringe at towering packs for two nights. Hell, I cringe when I see two people each with their own stove and cookset nowadays. But it's this seemingly enlightened attitude and looking down at people with heavy packs that has killed the reputation of ultralight backpacking recently. Skurka doesn't use the word "ultralight" anymore because of the elitist connotation associated with it.

So I guess what I'm saying is that if these people with 40, 50, 60, 100 lbs packs are happy, I don't care about their packs and am happy to share the woods. If they wish there was a lighter way, I'd show them what I've learned from BPL. At first, I was pretty snotty about my baseweight when it dropped, but now I keep my mouth shut and just enjoy the hiking. I think I'm probably much more fun to be around now too.

-Jeff

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Recurring theme on 11/25/2012 15:18:54 MST Print View

There is plenty of pushback from the "other side" too. many folks with packs that size still consider people with smaller packs to be unprepared and uncomfortable.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Recurring theme on 11/25/2012 23:37:47 MST Print View

Just posted a trip report where I used all my old gear. The gear list might surprise you.

Click Here

James Skeen
(andyskeen)

Locale: Upstate NY/Ft. Collins, CO
Weight vs. Comfort on 12/12/2012 14:26:48 MST Print View

Having carried 80-100lbs on my back for weeks on end, I know the value of having a light pack.

And, having experienced terrible weather of all kinds, in the same apparel, I know that being comfortable is something I will never willingly compromise.

Nor will I opt for a cold meal over hot food. I'll always have a stove and fuel, if I can help it.

So, 30lbs or so is probably the lowest I'd go for a multi-day trip in which I'd see real terrain and weather.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
nice commentary on 12/22/2012 00:19:00 MST Print View

Jeff wrote, "I'm conflicted when I see these threads about heavier packs because on one hand, I've been there and now I've "seen the light," as it's been said. I, too, cringe at towering packs for two nights. Hell, I cringe when I see two people each with their own stove and cookset nowadays. But it's this seemingly enlightened attitude and looking down at people with heavy packs that has killed the reputation of ultralight backpacking recently. Skurka doesn't use the word "ultralight" anymore because of the elitist connotation associated with it.

So I guess what I'm saying is that if these people with 40, 50, 60, 100 lbs packs are happy, I don't care about their packs and am happy to share the woods. If they wish there was a lighter way, I'd show them what I've learned from BPL. At first, I was pretty snotty about my baseweight when it dropped, but now I keep my mouth shut and just enjoy the hiking. I think I'm probably much more fun to be around now too."

It's nice to see posts like this here. For myself, i never did the ultra heavy thing, though i have definitely carried unecessary gear, and still occasionally do to a lesser extent i think.

I've been lurking here for awhile before i joined. There is a lot of great stuff to learn here, and i like that sometimes i feel a bit like an idiot or rather a bit ignorant when reading some of the threads here (anodizing aluminum!)--keeps me humble and makes me realize i have a lot to learn. But i have noted a sort of attitude of elitism here sometimes.

Also, as i've gotten more into UL type thinking, gear, and planning--i've noticed it has increased my "monkey mind chatter" which is something that i like being in nature to tone down (i also meditate to help with that). It's almost ironic. I'm constantly thinking about the next best and lightest thing, how to modify this, or modify that, etc, etc. I deliberately have to take a conscious step back sometimes because i have a slightly OCD type personality.

I've seen people take the ultralight thing to a religious zealotry level at worst and obsessiveness on the lesser end. I could see myself getting to the latter at least, and that's not where i want to be. Does anyone really need to cut holes out of their toothbrush? How would that increase your comfort level?

I guess i'm turned off by extremism, having been extremist in the past. I don't don't judge individuals for it though, whether they carry a super heavy pack or SXUL pack, but to me both are kind of missing the point if they focus too much on the gear. What i really want to do is get more into bushcrafting and using what's in nature already. Serves two purposes, gets you more light, but also tunes you into nature more. When i grow up, i want to be like Cody Lundin.

Jennifer Mitol
(Jenmitol) - M

Locale: In my dreams....
Going UL on 12/22/2012 11:19:34 MST Print View

I, too, lurked a lot before I joined, then started asking a lot of questions (thanks everyone!). I am so happy I found this site, and that I've learned so much about how to actually enjoy backpacking instead of making it an endurance test.

Unfortunately...now I'm just mad that I can't stop thinking about how to lighten my pack, carry smaller, lighter stuff, modify what I have, wear better clothes...
You guys are cleaning out my bank account with all this talk of cuben and titanium and eVent and merino and possumdown (down from possums???!!!). I love you for it, but gear swap and STP and Backcountry.com 20% off and The Clymb - ARGH - I just can't resist!!!!

Who needs to pay the mortgage when I could be sleeping on a BA SL Q-core in a Palisades quilt under a cuben tarp wearing down booties and merino leggings and a black rock gear down hat and a cap4 hoody??

;)

Jeffs Eleven
(WoodenWizard) - F

Locale: Greater Mt Tabor
Builders level on 12/22/2012 12:24:00 MST Print View

Not to rain on any parade of slammin that guy, which I agree, his stuff is ridiculous.

But I nerdily studied that pic and I think its a Stanley SharkTooth saw. There is a little taper to it and... a saw is slightly more useful in the woods than a level. He may be dumb, but he's not stupid.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Builders level on 12/22/2012 13:46:14 MST Print View

I think you're right on the saw vs a level. I feel so much better about in now ;)

Was it George Bernard Shaw that said, "what a shame to waste youth upon the young"?

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
Re on 12/22/2012 14:33:27 MST Print View

Awesome posts Justin and jen.

If you can pay the mortgage AND sleep under a cuben hexamid you will have beaten life, that's all I can say :)

Jeremy Platt
(jeremy089786) - F

Locale: Sydney
Packrafts on 12/23/2012 21:00:27 MST Print View

Modded white water Packrafts in cold climates! I went from 30L 3kg overnight packs to 80L 13kg packs almost over night! Add raft, wetsuits, paddles, helmet, throw bag, real dry bags, life jacket and a bunch of accessories and clothes for repair, maintenance and hypothermia.

So strange having people ohh and ahh over the size of your pack and how heavy it must be again!

Daniel Russell
(Superfluous_Grizzly)

Locale: Creation
My poor friend on 12/27/2012 11:46:48 MST Print View

I didn't realize my friends picture would cause so much attention haha! I forgot it was even posted.

He was very proud to carry such a heavy weight. I choose not to comment on whether he did this from stupidity or ignorance. However, what I did not mention in the first post is that THIS WAS THE HIKE OUT! Think about all those consumables he packed in! I believe he made 3 trips (I hadn't arrived yet). My friends and I have discussed his excessive pack weight and the risks of injury. We don't think it is quite as funny and "cool" as he does, especially when we are the ones that would have to save his butt if he was hurt.

We went on an "End of the World" trip the weekend of the 21st and his pack weighed 97lbs (he weighed it on a scale before he left). This is extremist in all categories and he is far from a conditioned weight lifter.

He packs beyond necessity to the extent of luxury (air mattress, camp chairs, 5lbs of hamburger meat, 30 box of domestics).
Now that I think about it.... its pure stupidity.

The Stanley Saw did come in quite handy though when I was foraging fallen trees. ;P

The guy in the background is my brother and he is using my "back-up" gear. That is why he looks like he knows what he's doing. :)

Edited by Superfluous_Grizzly on 12/27/2012 11:48:15 MST.

Alex Eriksson
(aeriksson) - M

Locale: Austin, TX
Maybe I'm an A-hole... on 12/27/2012 14:53:18 MST Print View

Correction, there's really no "maybe" since it's generally known that I'm an a-hole. Anyhow, I don't mind traveling in the woods with people who have differing views, budgets, and resultant packloads. That said, I reserve the right to do a number of things in an effort to not ruin my own time:

1. I'm not carrying any of your sh*t, period...
2. If you fall and bust your ass, I'm not carrying your sh*t out (exception: food, water, first aid)...
3. If you're cutting water because you're carrying too much, see #1, then have some of my water, but also see #4...
4. I'm not compromising my own safety because you were ill-prepared...
5. I reserve the right be impressed with your feats of awesomeness if you have a good time, but I can still make fun...
6. I will begrudgingly acknowledge that I'm more comfortable because of your excess, or penchant for bushcraft.

This may not be the way to make friends and influence people, but we'll see how it goes.

Unrelated: it was an interesting read, that hike report further up the thread, however it highlighted something I'd long since forgotten about; the tension between hikers and mountain bikers. As a long time member of the latter, and a new member of the former, I guess I have to walk a pretty thin line. As a long-time downhill mountain biker I used to go back into the woods to clear trails, cut new trails from deer trails, and build stuff out of deadfall. But I digress.

Edited by aeriksson on 12/27/2012 14:56:55 MST.

Susan Papuga
(veganaloha) - M

Locale: USA
Re: Exaggerated pack weights????" on 01/03/2013 02:15:51 MST Print View

"Is that a Stanely builder's level hanging out the front?"

Maybe he's just happy to be there....