MYOG Bivy
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Green Thumb
(greenthumb)
MYOG Bivy on 10/27/2012 17:44:47 MDT Print View

I've been meaning to get these pictures posted for awhile. Like a few others, I used Jamie Shortt's bivy at www.lytw8.com as a reference. Jamie was great with pointers and advice.

I used blue silnylon seconds and black Momentum M50 with a strip of noseeum mesh. This bivy weighs in at ~4.5 ounces and packs even smaller that the stuff sack allows. I use a NeoAir XLite and Marmot Hydrogen in the bivy and it is plenty roomy. I even slept a night in it with my 2 year old son curled up with me inside the bivy.

I'm working on an idea for a detachable hood that would make the mesh portion a bit more weather resistant if needed. Enjoy the pictures.

Size

Empty Bivy

Mesh Hood

Hood with bag

Full bivy

End shot

Edited by greenthumb on 10/27/2012 17:46:26 MDT.

Sean Rhoades
(kingpin)

Locale: WV
Bivy on 10/27/2012 19:28:53 MDT Print View

Looks great. Especially like the blue/black color combo.

Clint Wayman
(cwayman1) - M

Locale: East Tennessee, US
MYOBivy on 11/05/2012 00:18:48 MST Print View

@GreenThumb,

Great lookin' bivy! As previously noted, the blue/black color mix works really well!

Best

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: MYOG Bivy on 11/05/2012 04:19:01 MST Print View

Green,

I can only echo the comments regarding the workmanship and choice of color. Well done! My own color choice was very similar when I made my MYOG version of a Meteor bivy, black on the bottom and a little bit lighter blue WPB fabric on top.

4.5 ounces is a great achievement for an easily set up and packed up hiking shelter. How much does the 2 year old weigh? ;-)

Do you carry a tarp to set up as a rain-fly in really inclement weather?

Please report back to us after you have field tested this excellent bivy with some actual hiker miles. I am particularly interested in it's performance regarding the choice of materials. I have toyed with the idea of going to a bivy from time to time but shied away due to all the reports of condensation issues.

Once again, excellent work!

Party On,

Newton

Green Thumb
(greenthumb)
Thanks! on 11/05/2012 16:18:34 MST Print View

I wish my son only weighed a quarter pound, especially near the end of a trip and he only wants to ride on my shoulders. It makes me especially grateful that I cut my base weight to 8 pounds.

Thus far, i've had the bivy out on three 3-day trips in Western North Carolina in night time temps ranging from 70's to mid 30's. I have noticed that in warmer temps, the inside of the Momentum50 has gotten clammy, but never really wet. I also notice that the bivy definitely adds some warmth to my old down sleeping bag. I think the mesh face panel has helped with condensation. I do use it under a tarp when I am expecting some sort of precipitation. I use the bivy as mostly piece of mind under an open ended tarp instead of an uber light weight shelter. Another factor that may have reduced condensation issues is that I haven't sealed any of the seams since I am relying on the tarp to deflect the bulk of rainy weather.

I think the silnylon was a good choice as it is fairly durable and water resistant. I haven't made use of a ground cover since I have been taking the bivy sack and the silnylon has held up well.

In total, I think I spent 3-4 hours max making this bivy sack. Not too bad considering it was my second go at some MYOG.

My first was my tarp that I posted on here

Edited by greenthumb on 11/05/2012 16:19:18 MST.

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: Thanks! on 11/05/2012 18:57:34 MST Print View

Green,

I drifted on over to your MYOG thread on the tarp. SWEET!

I especially like the beak-less design of the front and rear of the tarp. The forward ridge-line and the swept back side panels give you the effect of a beak without the "low entry angle" that a beak requires of the user.

I noticed a small grosgrain loop above the mesh window in your bivy. Is that there to keep the bivy off of your face? Do you have a corresponding loop on the underside of your tarp's ridge-line to attach a line from your bivy to the tarp? If so is it shock-cord or some other kind of line?

I had a similar set up a while back before I moved on to my Lightheart Gear Solo tent.

Party On,

Newton

Clint Wayman
(cwayman1) - M

Locale: East Tennessee, US
Tarp on 11/06/2012 08:19:16 MST Print View

@GT,

Like John, I just got back from your tarp post-- fantastic work! The blurb on sleeping soundly while your friends were troubled really sells it. Well, I'm obviously not glad that your friends were 'suffering' through the night, but it's definitely a fun story!

Best

Green Thumb
(greenthumb)
Loop on 11/06/2012 19:06:19 MST Print View

Newton,

I originally planned to sew in a tie off loop inside the ridge for my bivy tie out. I forgot to place it as I was sewing the ridge line. Up til now, I have just tied it off with 1.5mm cord to the tie out on the end of the ridge.

Matt

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: Loop on 11/06/2012 19:41:12 MST Print View

Matt,

If it has been working satisfactorily up until now I see no reason to change your setup.

That being said, a piece of 1/2" grosgrain, doubled over and sewn to the felled seam of your tarp's ridge line is an easy addition. Naturally the new stitches should be sealed but a little clear flowable windshield sealer would take care of that in minutes.

grosgrain loops

Notice the loop in the front is sewn under the reinforcement. The rear loop is simply sewn to the underside of the ridge line.

BTW I have to echo another poster. Man does that tarp of yours pitch tight! ;-)

Party On,

Newton