Forum Index » GEAR » Super-insulated jacket for sitting still for a few hours in 30s and 20s


Display Avatars Sort By:
M L
(herzzreh)
Super-insulated jacket for sitting still for a few hours in 30s and 20s on 10/18/2012 21:38:17 MDT Print View

Looking for a jacket that will keep me toasty while sitting still in low-30s to low-20s. Synthetic insulation preferred.

I'm leaning towards Patagonia DAS @ $150 or something from Mountain Hardwear...

Recommendations?

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
Re: Super-insulated jacket for sitting still for a few hours in 30s and 20s on 10/18/2012 22:02:21 MDT Print View

- Arcteryx Atom SV (100g Coreloft)
- First Ascent's Igniter parka (100g Primaloft One)

Both of these are in the same league as the Micropuff, biggest difference is going to be value.


Fwiw, having owned the Atom SV, it was sufficient for me resting @ 20-30F with proper base/mid layering (merino wool base+ R1).

M L
(herzzreh)
... on 10/18/2012 22:09:12 MDT Print View

Money is somewhat of an issue, so Arc'teryx is kinda out of the question.

Considering that I own bunch of R1-equivalents (ECWCS stuff), would it be better to just swing for the Micropuff hoody for significant savings?

To be honest, reason I'm leaning towards those two brands is because I get a heft discount with them...

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
Re: ... on 10/18/2012 22:30:10 MDT Print View

Go where the money saving takes you if that's the case.

Unless you really need the additional warmth of the DAS, the Micropuff w/ 100g Primaloft should be sufficient at those temps properly layered, and likely more versatile outside of dead frigging winter. Consider that layering the DAS under a shell may require you to size up your normal shell size.

I don't know your tolerances to cold, so take my input as just an outsiders suggestion, and nothing more. Last thing I want is for you to be snivelling in the cold because you listened to my input to save weight and money. When it's frigid (which 20-30F is to me unless I'm moving!), packing an extra 10oz. is nothing on the back.

Mary D
(hikinggranny) - MLife

Locale: Gateway to Columbia River Gorge
Super-insulated jacket for sitting still for a few hours in 30s and 20s on 10/18/2012 22:33:47 MDT Print View

My puffy jacket (Montbell Ex Light Down Jacket) isn't used as a stand alone jacket. It is part of my layering system, that starts with a base layer, plus a lightweight mid-layer, then the down jacket and finally my wind shirt and (most of the time here in the Pacific NW) my rain jacket. Plus, of course, warm hat and gloves plus rain mitts. If it's going to be a long sit, I put on baselayer bottoms under my nylon hiking pants and rain pants. When I stop to camp in cold weather, the first thing I do is set up my tent and change into those base layer bottoms.

I basically use the same hiking clothing winter and summer. At high altitudes, I can expect night/morning temps in the 20's and 30's even in mid-summer. I just add another layer or two for winter. Of course if I were in Wyoming, where I grew up, winter would involve several more layers!

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
DAS on 10/18/2012 22:38:41 MDT Print View

something with 150+ g/m of primaloft, preferably primalot one ... it all depends on the individual and their condition, but for 20F id want something much warmer than 100g/m while sitting around for hours at 20F ...

you will also put this jacket OVER any shell, not under, it is simply not designed that way as many belay jackets are oversized

an alternative is to use an outer synth jacket and an inner down one which can provide more flexibility and just as much warmth and protection, but at a cost of course

the DAS at 150$ is a very good deal

Brian Johns
(bcutlerj) - M

Locale: NorCal
GoLite Coal on 10/18/2012 23:43:31 MDT Print View

Should be cheap if you can find one. Around 14 oz. The hood is removable and doubles as a sleeping hat, and its uber warm. But like I said, it's almost a pound. $30 on eBay when available.

And E
(LunchANDYnner) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
MH Compressor hooded jacket on 10/18/2012 23:53:22 MDT Print View

Can be found at
http://www.mountaingear.com/webstore/Clothing/Jackets/Mountain-Hardwear/Hooded-Compressor-Jacket-Men-s/_/R-228261.htm

for only 148.97. They have several color/sizes available. They also have the non hooded version if you're an XXL and like blue for only 64.98

I own the non hooded version, and it is super warm for me. I can take it down to the 30's easily as I'm a very warm bodied person, with just a midweight base layer. I'm sure I can take it lower with a fleece under and/or a rain shell over.

Sorry, the hooded version is with Thermic Micro. The non hooded version I own has Primaloft.

Edited by LunchANDYnner on 10/18/2012 23:57:47 MDT.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Super-insulated jacket for sitting still for a few hours in 30s and 20s on 10/19/2012 07:29:22 MDT Print View

It depends on whether you run hot or cold when stationary.

I run extremeley hot when moving but if I stop for more than 15 minutes I get uber cold.

For me the Micro Puff or Atom SV would be warm enough at 20F while stationary for about 15 minutes but if stopped for longer I would do as Eric recommends and layer a down piece under either.

Both the SV and Micro Puff are really nice hoodies. You can get a last years model of Micro puff often on sale for 100$.

As other have mentioned do not forget the importance lower body insualtion.

The 2 piece system is heavier and sometimes more expensive but it offers massive versatility and security.

Richard Fischel
(RICKO) - F
@ $150 the das is a great price - what you'll get is something warmer than you may need and heavier than you might want on 10/19/2012 08:23:25 MDT Print View

I’d be perfectly happy sitting around in the temperature range you described and lower in any of the 100gm~3oz synthetic insulated jackets described with a base layer and a powerstretch/r1 top. If you were looking for a little extra protection, go with one of the hooded variants available in the jackets recommened. And while primaloft one is considered the gold-standard, it’s my understanding that when compared to primaloft sport, it has to be quilted and it’s insulative quality is more rapidly degraded by repeated stuffing/compression cycles. one of the things to factor in is your layering. If you go with the das, and you are just throwing it over a base layer, or a base layer and a light weight fleece you may want to go down a size depending on your build. Same with the micropuff and the atom sv. If you run really cold, you cannot go wrong with the das parka.

as far as layering a down layer under a synthetic insulation layer, many here find that works, and it may work for you in your situation, but i find that if i've worked up any head-of-steam prior to putting on that combination i end up with a lot of moisture in the down layer. i like to put on down last or need-be, under a breathable shell. if i'm layering i'd use something in the 60gm~2oz synthetic insulation range as a mid-layer instead of a down sweater. in very cold weather a 60gr piece could be your active layer and you'd be less concerned with moisture issues. you sacrifice some weight/insulation/compressibility, but it's all about making the right decisions/compromises that work for you.

don't forget to add good repaclement insoles to your foot gear if you can or have your feet well/properly insulated. standing around i get coldest, fastest through my feet if i'm not prepared.

Edited by RICKO on 10/19/2012 09:52:25 MDT.

drowning in spam
(leaftye) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: Super-insulated jacket for sitting still for a few hours in 30s and 20s on 10/20/2012 06:06:14 MDT Print View

I don't think I could stay warm if I were sitting around in a thin jacket. Maybe if I were standing or walking around a little, but I need more when I'm not exerting any energy.

Thomas Gauperaa
(gauperaa) - F - M

Locale: Norway
Re: Super-insulated jacket for sitting still for a few hours in 30s and 20s on 10/21/2012 01:39:53 MDT Print View

How about the Rab Photon Belay jacket? It's got 200g primaloft in the torso, and 100 or 170 in other areas.

Edited by gauperaa on 10/21/2012 02:20:13 MDT.

drowning in spam
(leaftye) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: Re: Super-insulated jacket for sitting still for a few hours in 30s and 20s on 10/21/2012 16:37:54 MDT Print View

uninvisibility bump

Slo Hiker
(SloHiker) - F

Locale: NC Foothills
Golite on 10/21/2012 20:45:15 MDT Print View

I have an earlier iteration of a synthetic fill jacket similar to the Cady that's very warm. http://www.golite.com/Ms-Cady-Synthetic-Insulated-Jacket-P46647.aspx

I guess it goes without saying that ANY insulated jacket gets a huge boost in efficiency when you wear your shell layer over it - especially if there's wind.

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
Re: Golite on 10/21/2012 20:59:11 MDT Print View

I guess it goes without saying that ANY insulated jacket gets a huge boost in efficiency when you wear your shell layer over it - especially if there's wind.

unless you need to take off said shell in very windy, conditions, put in the belay jacket, then put the shell back on ... imagine doing that at every belay ....

there is a reason why climbers oversize their belay jackets so that they go over all their other layers ;)

Aaron Croft
(aaronufl) - M

Locale: Alaska
Re: Re: Golite on 10/21/2012 21:05:28 MDT Print View

"imagine doing that at every belay"

I don't think the original poster is looking for a gnar gnar jacket for climbing, so this point is somewhat moot.

M L
(herzzreh)
... on 10/22/2012 09:10:05 MDT Print View

I forgot to mention... I already have the Ultralight Down shirt (forgot the exact name for it), so perhaps I should totally bypass likes of DAS and such and just go with a Micropuff or Compressor.

Eventually the down jacket will be getting sold as I will be spending a lot of time in coldi-sh (40s) and wet conditions. Based on soem reading I've down, down the road, my combo would be a Nanopuff+Micropuff/MH Compressor. This combo seems to give me roughly the same amount of insulation as DAS and such and weighs about the same with bit more versatility.

Whatcha think?

Edited by herzzreh on 10/22/2012 09:29:13 MDT.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: ... on 10/22/2012 09:25:32 MDT Print View

Layering 2 synethic pieces works well also, for wet weather I would be very happy with a synthetic and down layters.

ROBERT TANGEN
(RobertM2S) - M

Locale: Lake Tahoe
Shell over puffy, or puffy over shell? on 10/22/2012 16:25:29 MDT Print View

Hikin Granny said: “…then the down jacket and finally my wind shirt and (most of the time here in the Pacific NW) my rain jacket.” eric chan said: “you will also put this jacket OVER any shell, not under, it is simply not designed that way as many belay jackets are oversized.” I think the difference is in the size of the puffy jacket. Mary is using a relatively thin, small down jacket from MontBell, which can fit under a large rain shell without too much compression. I suspect that Eric has a climbing background, and Mark Twight’s book “Extreme Alpinism” says “Instead of adding or subtracting layers underneath the shells, try layering over the top of them.” (P. 83) “…wear clothing components that create a light, flexible ‘action suit.’ Depending on conditions, this could include light, stretchy fabrics worn as outer-wear, or simply light shells worn directly over long underwear.….Once stopped, don a big, synthetic belay jacket.” Twight envisions a very skinny shell suit, and a very big puffy jacket which couldn’t possibly fit under the shell. Mary has a large shell, I assume, and a small puffy, so her system works for her.

Mary D
(hikinggranny) - MLife

Locale: Gateway to Columbia River Gorge
Super-insulated jacket for sitting still for a few hours on 10/22/2012 17:38:19 MDT Print View

'Mark Twight’s book “Extreme Alpinism” says “Instead of adding or subtracting layers underneath the shells, try layering over the top of them.”'

Try that in the Pacific NW in the rainy season (or anywhere else when it's raining) and you'll very soon have a heavy, sopping wet, no-longer-puffy layer which won't provide any insulation at all! Priority #1 should be to keep that insulation dry!