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Phillip Asby
(PGAsby) - M

Locale: North Carolina
Just a quick thanks from a newbie - clothes systems on 10/16/2012 14:19:58 MDT Print View

Working on systems, learning, gear, keeping things light etc... as a newbie there's a lot to digest. This weekend I did a little camping with my son and took it as a chance to try out some gear/approaches. Specifically base layer, windshirt, insulating layer and shell. Given the temps and clear weather - I didn't have to use the full setup. But I had a few extra pieces of clothing in my bag "just in case" and didnt use them.

Specifically the windshirt. I have a Marmot Driclime which is on the heavier end I think and not currently in vogue around here it seems. Still - it worked like a charm in combination with a Montbell UL thermawrap. With a hat early in the am with temps in the 40s I was comfortable in the Montbell with a base. Then I wore pretty much the Marmot the rest of the time - shedding it later and being happy it was light and easily stuffed into my small 14L hydration daypack while hiking. Pulled it out when we finished our hike and it took the chill off. Pretty much just as described in the articles here. I had several articles of clothing not touched that wont go the next time.

This is no front page news exactly to the long timers here. But I did want to say I appreciate all the information here. I would not have even considered some of this stuff - without reading about it here I would never have taken a windshirt or even bought one. Or the Montbell for that matter. Both of which worked perfectly and cut down on a lot of bulk/weight.

Funny thing - some of you guys really know what the heck you're talking about! :-p

d k
(dkramalc) - MLife
Re: Just a quick thanks from a newbie - clothes systems on 10/16/2012 14:38:16 MDT Print View

+1 for me on the DriClime; even though I own a Golite windshirt that I bring along from time to time (but hardly ever use), the Marmot gets used far more. I'm just glad I have a spare for when this one wears out.

Brendan West
(bderw)

Locale: Northeast Pennsylvania
Trust on 10/21/2012 00:17:46 MDT Print View

I thought the same thing the first time I hiked through a storm with my newly purchased Dri Ducks rain jacket. "No way will I not sweat like the Dickens under this thing", I thought. But—I didn't!

It's great to pore over these articles and posts and think over everything in your mind, but when you get out there and put this knowledge to the test and find it actually *is* lighter and *is* easier and *is* better, it's a thing of beauty!

Jennifer Mitol
(Jenmitol) - M

Locale: In my dreams....
And everything else... on 10/21/2012 09:32:26 MDT Print View

+1 on the thanks to all of you.

Ill never forget a trip I took to the Porcupine Mountains about 4 years ago. I carried about 45-50 pounds...heck, my EMPTY Gregory pack weighed 8 pounds. I had heard of UL backpacking and I thought those people were weird. I was NEVER going to just sleep next to a log!!!!! I liked sleeping in a tent!!!

As I struggled up hills and teetered as I crossed streams, we kept being passed by this couple in what looked like daypacks!! and gym shoes!! I thought...those are those crazy people who sleep in the shelter of a log and eat cliff bars 3x/day.

But then we ended up camping somewhat near them - my dog kept wandering over to play with their dog - and as I walked over to retrieve my retriever I saw they had a tent. And a stove. And utensils. Hmmm...

The the next morning as they gleefully passed us on the trail while we huffed and puffed just putting on our packs, and had to sit and rest so many times to get that weight off our backs, I again looked at those teeny little daypacks and thought..."how the heck do they do that??"

And now, thousands of dollars later (argh!!), multiple iterations of my kit (I made the all-too-common mistake of GRADUALLY going lighter), I now have a base weight of 9.4 pounds for the fall, don't even notice the frameless pack on my back, and cannot wait for my JMT thru trip next year!!!

So thank you all again for the advice, help, admonitions, gear swap...although my next bit of questions will involve how do I STOP buying gear?? And how can I stop trolling gear swap????? I'm thrilled with my 9 pounds...but so many of you talk about 5.....hmmmmm.........

Pete Anderson
(hosaphone) - F

Locale: Boston-ish, MA
Re: Just a quick thanks from a newbie - clothes systems on 10/21/2012 12:08:52 MDT Print View

The DriClime isn't in vogue because technically a separate long-sleeve shirt and unlined windshirt would do the same thing and have more versatility. I am always careful to call it a "lined windshirt" because it does weigh ~3x as much as an unlined one.


That said, I own two (wore one of them out and tore holes in it but still great for wearing around the house, etc) and they are probably my most used pieces of gear. It has just the right amount of insulation, wind blocking and water resistance, and is more convenient than having to juggle separate layers.

In summer it's my insulating layer. In winter it's my baselayer worn over a light t-shirt (and typically all I need to hike in down to ~10F). In shoulder seasons it's great to either hike in if it's cold, or wear just when you're getting started. The ability to unzip it lets you regulate temperature easily while walking without needing to take off the pack. Synthetic lining and wind blocking keeps you warm if you're too lazy to stop and put on a rain shell when it's raining off and on.

I'm a huge fan of it even though technically it's not "optimal".

Edited by hosaphone on 10/21/2012 12:13:01 MDT.

todd harper
(funnymoney) - MLife

Locale: Sunshine State
Re: Just a quick thanks from a newbie - clothes systems on 10/21/2012 12:35:31 MDT Print View

Phillip,

The kindness and help you have found here has been seen by others. It does make this a great site.

Ryan Smith
(ViolentGreen) - M

Locale: Southeast
Re: Just a quick thanks from a newbie - clothes systems on 10/21/2012 12:41:36 MDT Print View

I was the same as you Phillip. I always doubted a windshirt would make it's way into my gear system even after reading countless positive things about them here. And now I own two of them!

Ryan