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diego dean
(cfionthefly) - M
Stream crossing using trail runners-coldest temp? on 10/09/2012 16:42:23 MDT Print View

What temperature are you comfortable regularly crossing streams while wearing trail runners that drain well and using a merino sock? I've done this in summertime with no issues but am going on a trip soon with temps in the 40's. Other options?

Art ...
(asandh) - F
Re: Stream crossing using trail runners-coldest temp? on 10/09/2012 16:53:27 MDT Print View

if you are crossing streams where just your feet get wet, what does it matter how cold the water is, it will only be a few seconds.

if you are crossing thigh high streams, then the cold will suck much more energy from your leg muscles than your feet, so maybe bring hip waders if you can't deal with it.

Edited by asandh on 10/09/2012 16:57:47 MDT.

Dan Durston
(dandydan) - M

Locale: Cascadia
Cold Streams on 10/09/2012 17:02:06 MDT Print View

It's tough to really put a specific temp on it, but when the stream crossings are getting chilly then add a pair of NRS Hydroskin socks over your regular socks. They're (edit: 0.5mm + other stuff) neoprene and they work well without being too bulky.

NRS Hydroskin Pic 2

Edited by dandydan on 10/09/2012 19:18:35 MDT.

Tyler Barcelli
(youngster) - M

Locale: Southeast
Re: Stream crossing using trail runners-coldest temp? on 10/09/2012 17:08:24 MDT Print View

Outside of some waders, anything you wear will get wet. Even "waterproof" boots if the water is over ankle high. I've found that if I take my socks off before crossing and put them on after, they really help keep my feet warm as I'm moving.

Edited by youngster on 10/09/2012 17:08:58 MDT.

diego dean
(cfionthefly) - M
Re: Re: Stream crossing using trail runners-coldest temp? on 10/09/2012 17:10:23 MDT Print View

My concern is not the time when my feet are actualy in the water but rather the next hour or so of hiking in wet shoes and socks. There must be a temp when your body heat for feet produced won't compensate for those cold feet..

I understand my feet wont stay dry, just wondering what temp I can expect to remain comfortable at... Generally speaking of course

Edited by cfionthefly on 10/09/2012 17:41:11 MDT.

Tyler Barcelli
(youngster) - M

Locale: Southeast
Re: Re: Re: Stream crossing using trail runners-coldest temp? on 10/09/2012 17:41:59 MDT Print View

When I've been out into the 20's, by simply removing my shoes and socks I've been fine once I start moving. I normally just remove my socks since my shoes don't collect much water. having dry socks to put on can make a world of difference. During the coldest part of winter though I usually have some bread bag VBL for my feet that I can put on if I ever get worried.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Stream crossing using trail runners-coldest temp? on 10/09/2012 17:51:35 MDT Print View

A bunch of us were out on a two-day ski tour, and we came up to the Little Truckee River looking for the bridge that was shown on the topo map. Unfortunately, the bridge had not existed for some years, so we had to ford the river.

The knee-deep water was barely above freezing and the river banks were snowy and icy. We had two choices. We could wear our heavy leather ski boots into the river to protect our feet, or we could wear just socks. The problem was that once we got out to the opposite side, we were going to have to ski for another mile or so to finish the trip at our vehicle. That could be cold.

I went into the water with boots on, and my partner went in with boots off. So, we were each a little cold and wet on the other side. We skied the last distance to the vehicle and discovered that it would not start, so we had to wait for three hours before the other ski crew found us. Waiting for three hours with freezing wet boots is no fun.

--B.G.--

Ozzy McKinney
(PorcupinePhobia) - F

Locale: PNW
insoles on 10/09/2012 17:59:08 MDT Print View

I find that taking off not just my socks, but removing the insoles as well, translates to pretty warm/dry feet when you put it all back together.

I've used Sealskin ("wpb") socks over merino socks sloshing around bogs under a crust of ice in freezing temps, and they were awesome. If you wear them to bed (or at least put them in your bag after wringing them out) they make putting on frozen shoes in the morning no big thing. I'm sure it's the same with the Hydroskins.

Anthony Weston
(anthonyweston) - MLife

Locale: Southern CA
snow on 10/09/2012 17:59:37 MDT Print View

a friend

Here There
(cowexnihilo) - MLife
NRS Socks on 10/09/2012 18:01:31 MDT Print View

I'll second Dan's suggestion for NRS neoprene socks. I've used them for stream crossings in the teens and been fine, and I wouldn't really want to do stream crossings in trail runners below freezing without them.

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
re: cold weather stream crossings on 10/09/2012 18:08:43 MDT Print View

For me, the window of use for Hydroskin socks (.5mm neoprene laminated to a fuzzy inner) is 45F or so down to 10F. With air temps below 20F and regular stream crossings above knee deep, the Hydroskins are adequate, but only with vigorous movement, lots of chocolate down the hatch, and an extra core layer (vest) to boost warmth.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Stream crossing using trail runners-coldest temp? on 10/09/2012 19:28:25 MDT Print View

Down to about 32 F water temperature.

DRY socks are the key. Take them off first.

Cheers

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Stream crossing using trail runners-coldest temp? on 10/09/2012 19:42:33 MDT Print View

"Down to about 32 F water temperature."

Do you find very much water that is colder than that?

--B.G.--

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Stream crossing using trail runners-coldest temp? on 10/09/2012 20:02:17 MDT Print View

Hi Bob

> Do you find very much water that is colder than that?
Well, the way it was phrased was a bit tongue-in-cheek, wasn't it? :-)
But I am sure you've been there too.

But technically yes: try slushy sea water. That can get several degrees colder.

Cheers