The New "Worlds lightest cannister stove"?
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Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: Re: Re: Re: Hacking the jet filter on 04/30/2013 22:33:14 MDT Print View

Yes, it will work without modification, but you can't clear a jam in the field if one occurs. Sintered brass filters have had this type of problem for a long time. They're generally a bad idea. Same problem as occurred on some versions of the old Hank Roberts type stoves.

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

Stuart R
(Scunnered) - F

Locale: Scotland
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Hacking the jet filter on 05/01/2013 15:14:59 MDT Print View

The FMS-116T aka Monatak Gnat has the same filter and I haven't heard of any problems with blockages.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Hacking the jet filter on 05/01/2013 15:58:25 MDT Print View

Well, maybe I'm overly cautious. It's just that I've been bit -- more than once -- by sintered brass filters. Useless idea in my opinion. What's the good in a filter that you can't clear in the field? Just leave the filter out and let the jet itself clog. A jet clog can be cleared in the field with a bit of wire, but a sintered brass filter typically requires tools and/or solvents if it clogs up, things in short supply in the field.

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Hacking the jet filter on 05/01/2013 16:00:35 MDT Print View

If the stove is used upright then the muck usually stays at the bottom of the canister. So the problem really only surfaces when you are running a remote with an inverted canister. But ... some of us do that sort of thing. See for example the Brunton Stove Stand article. There will be more on that theme soon.

Cheers

Michael Gillenwater
(mwgillenwater) - M

Locale: Seattle area
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Hacking the jet filter on 05/01/2013 16:11:07 MDT Print View

Roger, we are still eagerly awaiting...

Jim Sweeney
(swimjay) - MLife

Locale: Northern California
AliExpress on 05/02/2013 14:40:09 MDT Print View

Net experience with AliExpress has been very positive.

My first 300T from them arrived with some shipping damage, which I was able to fix myself, though it left one of the pot supports pivoting a bit stiffly, and not quite clearing the valve handle. (See post above, ~ 04/09). I emailed them, suggesting they might want to use a stronger shipping container, but that my stove was functional. They responded by offering to send another stove, which they have done. Can't ask for better service than that.

Also purchased a 116T, which seems also excellent, though different. It's slightly heavier, as noted in Roger's excellent article, and might be optimized for larger pots-- its pot supports spread farther-- and greater heat-- the flame seems slightly more coherent at high output than it does with the 300T. On the other hand, the 300T's flame seems wonderfully stable at low output, and I don't imagine a better simmering stove exists.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: AliExpress on 05/02/2013 16:09:30 MDT Print View

Thanks, Jim.

Good experience report (experience thus far of course).

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

Dave Grey
(dapperdave) - F
Sintered filter Removal - no drill required on 03/29/2014 09:13:15 MDT Print View

My FMS-300T suffered from loss of power on my last trip last summer, so I decided to try removing the sintered filter.

1 The locknut and burner assembly were only finger-tight and easy to remove.

2 Removing the 7mm nut with the "jet-hole" from the orange valve assembly was more difficult and required 7mm socket and, not having access to a vice, I needed to wrap a towel round the valve assembly to be able to grip it tightly enough - as you would expect, it unscrews anti-clockwise.

3 The sintered filter is located inside this nut and once exposed can be removed intact by simply levering out with the point of a needle.

4 Small piece of Tp inserted.

5 Reassembled in reverse order, I left the jet-hole nut only finger tight to allow for field maintenance (I assume this will be OK)

Hope this helps someone

Dave

Edit - Tapping the sintered filter on a piece of white paper produced a small quantity of fine reddish-brown dust, for information I had only run about 500g of Snow-Peak gas through this stove

Edited by dapperdave on 03/29/2014 10:56:11 MDT.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Sintered filter Removal - no drill required on 03/29/2014 15:13:30 MDT Print View

I have found the TP to be a bit too variable in performance. So these days I recommend a 6 mm disk of coffee filter paper instead, placed under the jet. Easy enough to carry a few spares - 0 g each!

I hadn't tried a needle to get the sintered filter out. Interesting. That you were able to shake a stack of dust out - yep.

> I left the jet-hole nut only finger tight to allow for field maintenance
Unwise. If the gas leaks out from the thread region that can upset the burn pattern or worse. I would suggest tightening it up a little more. You could file a small spanner out of a little bit of metal maybe.

Cheers

karl hafner
(khafner) - MLife

Locale: upstate NY
stoves on 08/14/2014 09:29:41 MDT Print View

Why buy a stove that you have to modify? I had one of the first XGK stoves from MSR. While they are field serviceable now they were not originally you had to send it back to them. It failed (plugged up) in the field. All stoves have problems. You just need to be aware and act accordingly.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: stoves on 08/14/2014 12:58:29 MDT Print View

I had every version of those MSR stoves including the first XGK stoves and I never had to send anything back to MSR. There was nothing in the warranty about that.

I can believe that yours plugged up in the field, and I figured that out for my own. I was using Coleman fuel in the red metal can. The fuel can had a cap with a plastic cover. Fine millings from the plastic cover got into the can, probably at the factory. In the early days, I did not filter the fuel. As a result, the fuel and the fine plastic millings got into the fuel bottle beside the stove. The millings moved through the fuel pipe until they hit heat, which was directly below the burner. At that point, they melted together and formed a black clog. It was easily cleaned out if you know how to disassemble your stove. The easier solution was to filter the fuel as it went into the fuel bottle.

--B.G.--