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John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Let's Talk Recycled Water Bottles on 10/07/2012 22:30:34 MDT Print View

I had been using this reclaimed "peanut jar" as a re-purposed water bottle mounted on my shoulder straps via shock cord and toggles.

water bottle 1

They weigh 1.65 or 1.95 ounces including the cap. Curiously a blue capped one is lighter. and a red capped one is heavier. ;-?

The problem with these is that the caps and the bottles need to be hand washed. Dishwashers generate to much heat during the wash and dry cycle. Their shape changes and leaks around the caps start to develop because the seal isn't perfect anymore.

I moved back to the tried and true 1.8 oz Gatorade bottle.

water bottle 2

But lately I've noticed an annoying tendency for them to slip the bonds of my shoulder strap mounted shock cord and toggle water bottle carriers. I believe it has something to do with the bell shape and the weight of a quart of water.

Lately I've moved on to a new reclaimed and re-purposed water bottle.

water bottle 3

The Powerade bottle is a 1 quart bottle that weighs 1.65 oz and with its different shape seems to stay put in my preferred method of carry.

Shoulder strap type water bottle carry

Note: The bottles in the picture above are the smaller 20 oz Gatorade bottles.

On a recent training walk with the above pack and carrying one re-purposed Powerade quart bottle on each shoulder strap all went well. The bottles rode well, never slipped out of the shock cord carriers and were easily accessible.

I think the difference is the shape of the top of the bottle. The fact that the bottle weighs 1.65 oz which equals the smaller "peanut jar" is a win, win for me. I've added no extra weight for the bottle and gained some volume as far as the water that I can carry.

Party On,

Newton

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Let's Talk Recycled Water Bottles on 10/08/2012 03:27:43 MDT Print View

> The problem with these is that the caps and the bottles need to be hand washed.
This is a problem?

Cheers

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re:This is a problem? on 10/08/2012 06:11:02 MDT Print View

Roger,

I will attest to my own laziness when it comes to standing in front of the sink to hand wash anything. ;-) L O L

Party On,

Newton

Kronos Master of Fate
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re:This is a problem? on 10/08/2012 06:17:40 MDT Print View

I am my own dishwasher. Never had a use for the appliance type.

That's pretty lazy John.

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: That's pretty lazy on 10/08/2012 06:26:23 MDT Print View

Hi Ken,

ROTFLMAO :-)

Yep!

I'll hike a hundred miles, sleep on the ground in a tent, cook my own meals and make my own gear but I hate washing dishes.

Have a great day.

Party On,

Newton

Erik Basil
(EBasil) - M

Locale: Atzlan
Powerade good on 10/08/2012 06:47:57 MDT Print View

I really like the Powerade bottles, for the weight, shape and durability.

I direct our butler to gently hand wash mine.

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: I direct our butler to gently hand wash mine. on 10/08/2012 06:56:14 MDT Print View

Thank you Erik.

But now I have to go outside and get my silk and merino "base layer" off of the clothes line.

Drying Out

;-)

Party On,

Newton

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Let's Talk Recycled Water Bottles on 10/08/2012 08:01:15 MDT Print View

"Curiously a blue capped one is lighter. and a red capped one is heavier. ;-?"

Well duh! The government carries much of the weight of the blue capped one, the red capped one you have to carry all on your own....

Jon Fong
(jonfong) - F - M

Locale: FLAT CAT GEAR
Red and Blue on 10/08/2012 09:09:43 MDT Print View

""Curiously a blue capped one is lighter. and a red capped one is heavier. ;-?""

"Well duh! The government carries much of the weight of the blue capped one, the red capped one you have to carry all on your own...."

THAT'S Funny

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: Re: Let's Talk Recycled Water Bottles on 10/08/2012 10:22:29 MDT Print View

Doug,

Love the comment!

The cost of my lifetime membership is worth every penny if for nothing else but reading your posts. ;-)

Yeah, I know that I could read them for free but they are worth their weight in gold!

Thanks for the smiles.

Party On,

Newton

Cesar Valdez
(PrimeZombie) - F

Locale: Scandinavia
bottles, bottles everywhere, but not a drop to drink... on 10/08/2012 10:57:08 MDT Print View

I have collected in my gear closet a bunch of different recycled plastic bottles for water.

There is no Gateraid here in Sweden (or at least, I have not seen it), but at 1.8oz or about 51g that strikes me as a tad heavy for a plastic bottle--but probably makes up for it in durablity.

My current favorite is an Evian 750ml bottle that is 29g, cap included. Then there is Imsdal bottles, 700ml and 31g total. Not sure if you can get these versions in the USA. But I remember in the US getting generic spring water bottles that were pretty tough and light too.

I have been on a quest for a bottle over 500ml that is the number 2 plastic, which I have read is supposed to be the "safest." The two I mention above are number 1--numbers 5 and 7 are supposed to be the "worst" but I am no expert.

I do have a 475ml little bottle from the US that I saved from last time I was there that is 35g and pretty dang tough. It's a recycled witch hazel bottle, and it's 2 plastic. I am pretty sure I remember bigger versions of this bottle, and I think I bought it at Kmart.

Anyone an expert on plastic that can weigh in here, btw?

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: Tokyo, Japan
Lightest 500ml bottle on 10/08/2012 16:14:24 MDT Print View

Coca Cola sells these 12g 500ml bottles for flavored water here in Japan. Crushable environmentally friendly... yada yada. Never used one myself as I am a 1L Nalgene hard bottle devotee as Fall/Winter approaches.

http://www.thecoca-colacompany.com/dynamic/press_center/2010/06/i-lohas-mikan----a-new-flavored-water-from-the-i-lohas-brand.html

Edited by rmjapan on 10/08/2012 16:15:03 MDT.

Dena Kelley
(EagleRiverDee) - M

Locale: Eagle River, Alaska
re Let's Talk Recycled Water Bottles on 10/08/2012 16:23:58 MDT Print View

I don't wash my water bottles. I rinse them out. If I suspect some sort of contamination, I'll use warm water with a bit of bleach and let them sit for a while but other than that, I don't know why you'd need to run water bottles through a dishwasher.

Mal Hooper
(malligator)

Locale: Valley of the Sun
Re: Re: Let's Talk Recycled Water Bottles on 10/08/2012 16:25:41 MDT Print View

@Doug

I don't care who ya are, that's funny right there.

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: I don't know why you'd need to run water bottles through a dishwasher. on 10/08/2012 17:02:51 MDT Print View

Dena,

For the same reason that drink glasses, knives, forks, spoons and plates get run through a dishwasher or hand washed in the sink.

I have a collection of these things and after I've used them on a hike or a training walk they deserve a bath the same way I relish a good hot shower.

They may sit unused for quite a while and a water bottle that has been dipped into a water source on the trail has the same things on the outside of it that we treat the water inside of it for.

In the heat there is no avoiding perspiration dripping onto the bottles carried on my shoulder straps. Add a little trail dirt and I see no reason not to pass them through the sink or dishwasher when the hike or training walk is over. YMMV

I guess I could mix up some one to ten bleach solution in a plastic tub, submerge them and let them soak for a while instead. The dishwasher is easier for me.;-)

Funny thing is that the Gatorade and Powerade bottles and cap survive the dishwasher just fine.

Party On,

Newton

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: I don't know why you'd need to run water bottles through a dishwasher. on 10/08/2012 18:11:06 MDT Print View

I think the plastic degrades over time.

I replace them every year or so.

Or if there's any sign of delamination or cracking.

I don't see how bottles every get so dirty you have to worry much about cleaning - maybe swish around a little detergent and warm water, shake vigorously,...

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Let's Talk Recycled Water Bottles on 10/08/2012 20:53:52 MDT Print View

Douglas,

Thanks for sharing your humor with us.

I'd hate to see it bottled up.

Daryl

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: Recycled Water Bottles on 10/09/2012 04:40:13 MDT Print View

"I'd hate to see it bottled up".

Good one Daryl! ;-)

OK this has been a fun little thread!

Points we have established.

1.) Ken T. and I both agree that I am pretty lazy when it comes to my water bottle maintenance. ;-)

2.) Roger, Ken, Dena and Jerry do not mind maintaining their water bottles by hand. :-)

3.) Cesar and Rick have both found lighter alternatives.

4.) Erik likes the Powerade bottles but makes his butler gently hand wash his water bottles.:-)

5.) Jon, Mal, Daryl and I all enjoy Doug's sense of humor. ;-)

Original point of the first post.

It was to let the members of this forum know that there is a lighter and better shaped IMHO recyclable and able to be re-purposed plastic "water" bottle possibilty out there for use.

Thread Drift.

When I mentioned what happened to my "peanut jars" in the dishwasher it was meant to let others know that these particular bottles don't play well in that kind of heat. I don't believe that water bottles have to be washed in the dishwasher, far from it. I stayed two weeks on the AT last year with only a pre-filter, rinse, fill and treat regimen.

FWIW According to the info in the following links the main reason for not reusing #1 plastic bottles is that they are just porous enough to harbor bacteria.

http://www.livescience.com/5487-murky-truth-leaching-plastic-bottles.html

"Number 7 plastic, a hodgepodge of various newer plastics not defined by numbers 1 through 6, often contains BPA. Then again, new plastics purposefully free of BPA might carry the number 7. And other plastics might be hard to recycle (#4 and 5) or porous enough to harbor bacteria (#1)".

>>>and<<<

http://trusted.md/blog/vreni_gurd/2007/03/29/plastic_water_bottles#axzz1uScJmkiE

"The type of plastic bottle in which water is usually sold is usually a #1, and is only recommended for one time use. Do not refill it".

I hope that these links in some way helps to answer Cesar's question at the end of his post.

Party On,

Newton

Cesar Valdez
(PrimeZombie) - F

Locale: Scandinavia
Re: John on 10/09/2012 11:35:37 MDT Print View

Thanks for the info. Too busy a lot of times to research every little detail, so it is much appreciated. Looks like what I read in the past was correct about 5 and 7 being bad, though I did not know about the issues associated with #1. #2 was absent from that quote, so I guess that means my earlier reports still stand about #2. Tomorrow I am going to make it a point at the supermarket (I am going anyway) to find a lightweight (something under 40g and at least 500ml). I don't like the idea of my bottles, super-light or not, being loaded with bacteria. I do, for the record, make sure to wash my bottles often by hand. It's easy if you are a parent of younger kids, because you probably have a brush for cleaning out baby bottles, which works great for water bottles too.

I will try and remember to report back any good finds out there... though these might only be alternatives to be found here in Sweden.

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: Cesar on 10/09/2012 13:27:41 MDT Print View

You are quite welcome. ;-)

Party On,

Newton