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Dwight Shackelford
(zydeholic) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
bush buddy and dry wood on 03/14/2007 13:21:42 MDT Print View

I'm looking at that BushBuddy stove, and it talks about being able to find dry wood, or almost dry wood, or learn how to burn wet wood, etc.

Since constructing my bivy (almost done), I have some 3-Layer WPB left over. I'm wondering if a pouch could be made to put prospective tinder in, though possibly wet, and that this tinder could dry out during the day as you're hiking.

Any ideas? Otherwise I'm going to make some gaiters maybe, from the left-over WPB.

Or maybe a stuff sack for my sleeping bag. Let it dry out more during the day.

Erin McKittrick
(mckittre) - MLife

Locale: Seldovia, Alaska
Re: bush buddy and dry wood on 03/15/2007 01:53:27 MDT Print View

It is my understanding that waterproof breathable is relying on human body heat to keep turning liquid water into vapor. The tinder wouldn't get any more wet from wet gear in your pack, but I think all it would do is slowly equilibrate humidity with the surrounding air. If it's raining - the air is wet, the tinder is wet, the air both inside and outside the bag will be wet. Don't think it'll help you, but I'm sure someone will come along and correct me if I'm wrong.

But if there's any wood at all in the environment, finding some dry wood is almost always possible. And it's actually quite fun to learn where to look for it.

-Erin
www.groundtruthtrekking.org/WildCoast.php

Dwight Shackelford
(zydeholic) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Re: bush buddy and dry wood on 03/15/2007 16:20:26 MDT Print View

This material is dark, so I was envisioning just having it tied to the top of the pack. Of course, never having hiked in the rain, I'm forgetting that when its raining, there's usually not much sun.

There's also the option of wearing it, say, like an albatross around your neck, and letting the body heat it like that. Anyway, just wondering what to do with this leftover fabric. I think gaiters might be the way to go.

Dwight

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: Re: Re: bush buddy and dry wood on 03/15/2007 20:08:16 MDT Print View

Dwight,
WB fabric needs some heat inside to drive water vapor out. A WB bag on top of your pack on a cloudy, rainy day will not get warm enough. On a clear, sunny day, the WB fabric would be worse than letting the vagrant zephyrs and sunlight dry the wood. And if the Bush Buddy works at all like other small, enclosed wood stoves, you can burn wood that is a little wet. It will smoke a lot, but it will burn. Some fire starter in the form of dry wood, pitch pine, or maybe a little alcohol doesn't hurt for getting it going. The best bet is to look for dry wood - which you can find even in rainy woods. The small branches on the lower trunks of conifers, twigs with loose bark that strips off easily, things like that. You only need a couple of hands full for a small, enclosed stove.

Yeah, use the extra fabric for gaiters.

Edited by vickrhines on 03/15/2007 20:09:22 MDT.

Scott White
(sdwhitey) - F

Locale: Smoky Mountains
Re: bush buddy and dry wood on 03/18/2007 00:45:19 MDT Print View

Dwight,

I agree with the others. I don't think WPB would work for drying wood or a sleeping bag. I just used a small amount of goretex to make a really lightweight pair of shell mitts.

Check out my post:

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/xdpy/forum_thread/6921/index.html?skip_to_post=49262#49262

Edited by sdwhitey on 03/18/2007 00:46:23 MDT.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: bush buddy and dry wood on 03/18/2007 03:39:24 MDT Print View

Hi Erin

> It is my understanding that waterproof breathable is relying on human body heat to keep turning liquid water into vapor. The tinder wouldn't get any more wet from wet gear in your pack, but I think all it would do is slowly equilibrate humidity with the surrounding air. If it's raining - the air is wet, the tinder is wet, the air both inside and outside the bag will be wet. Don't think it'll help you, but I'm sure someone will come along and correct me if I'm wrong.

You are not wrong. But you knew that. :-)