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Henry Shires
(07100) - F - M
Re: Survey of lightweight one-person shelters? on 09/17/2012 16:17:13 MDT Print View

Thanks, Jason, for the link the nielsenbrownoutdoors site. I posted this response there but I'll post it here too.

Just to let you all know, we are happy to install the apex pullouts on request (no charge, just ask for them in the comments field on the order form). Later this year we're going to make them standard on the Notch as they are now for the StratoSpire series. However, I'm not sure I agree that they are completely necessary for a strong pitch. As noted below, the trick to a taut ridgeline and fly panels is to make sure that you don't over-tension the ends during initial setup. Stake one end and then pull out the second end to where you just begin to feel a little resistance from the underlying floor strap. And I do mean JUST. If you over-tension the ends you have no hope of a taut, slightly curved ridgeline. Also, the vestibule guylines are a little too long for optimal pitch if you use them fully extended. Shortening them a few cm before staking will better align the tension with the slope of the vestibule and put more tension on the apex points (and less stress on the buckle).

Henry Shires
Tarptent

Jack Elliott
(JackElliott) - F

Locale: Bend, Oregon, USA
If the ground ain't flat? on 09/17/2012 16:34:19 MDT Print View

Henry, thanks for taking the time to address the point.

Would the apex pullouts provide any benefit vis a vis a taut pitch if the ground under the shelter isn't flat or level? I've had to camp on some pretty bumpy spots.

Jason Elsworth
(jephoto) - M

Locale: New Zealand
Survey of lightweight one-person shelters? on 09/17/2012 16:44:55 MDT Print View

and I said I am looking for something with a floor.

The cricket has an inner net, same as the Notch.

Jason Elsworth
(jephoto) - M

Locale: New Zealand
Survey of lightweight one-person shelters? on 09/17/2012 16:48:37 MDT Print View

Thanks Henry. The Notch is currently on my new one person shelter short list and the Stratosphire is one an even shorter short list of two adults and a kid shelters. The Notch seems to be getting great reviews.

Diana Vann
(DianaV) - MLife

Locale: Wandering
Re: Re: Survey of lightweight one-person shelters? on 09/17/2012 16:55:40 MDT Print View

Hi, Henry.

Thanks for taking the time to comment on this forum. I've been reading about the Notch (and considering one as my next shelter purchase). The double vestibules are very attractive since it would be possible to store gear in one side and have unobstructed entry (and exit) via the other side. And, as pointed out in one of the videos, in a pinch one of the vestibules could be used to house an additional person without limiting access for the occupant of the sleeping compartment.

One thing I noticed in some of the reviews is that some users have felt a bit cramped inside the sleeping part of the shelter. Do you have plans for either of the following options for the Notch anytime soon?

1. A slightly larger interior size (a little wider sleeping compartment).

2. A larger sleeping compartment would mean additional weight. Do you plan to offer a cuben fiber model?

Thanks

Henry Shires
(07100) - F - M
Re: Re: Re: Survey of lightweight one-person shelters? on 09/17/2012 17:02:32 MDT Print View

> 1. A slightly larger interior size (a little wider sleeping compartment).

No. Widening the middle is technically not a problem but widening the ends would require longer struts and make for a longer packed size. Not going there. The StratoSpire 1 is the solution to more space at the same packed size.

> 2. A larger sleeping compartment would mean additional weight. Do you plan to offer a cuben fiber model?

No. I refuse to jack up the price.

Henry Shires
(07100) - F - M
Re: If the ground ain't flat? on 09/17/2012 17:10:25 MDT Print View

> Would the apex pullouts provide any benefit vis a vis a taut pitch if the ground under the shelter isn't flat or level? I've had to camp on some pretty bumpy spots.

Yes, I suppose for securing the apexes although it seems to me that the slope would need to be pretty severe to start interfering with vestibule tensioning provided you lengthen/shorten the vestibule guylines to suit conditions. As long as you can get the guylines to follow the natural slope of the vestibules then side to side shouldn't bother you. The other point is that you can raise and lower each pole independently to adjust fly edge height above ground for side slopes or weather direction.

Edited by 07100 on 09/17/2012 17:11:52 MDT.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Dust Getting in Tent?? on 09/17/2012 18:08:48 MDT Print View

To avoid dust in your tent do NOT buy a TT Moment. Mine got as much dust inside as it did outside in Utah's Coyote Gulch dust storms.

The perimeter floor-to-walls netting strip & netting front door let all the wind-blown dust in. Nasty and gritty. Gets on everything.

Otherwise the tent is great. But windblown snow would be similar to dust.

Edited by Danepacker on 09/17/2012 18:09:25 MDT.

Jack Elliott
(JackElliott) - F

Locale: Bend, Oregon, USA
Just getting a grip on the situation on 09/17/2012 18:24:35 MDT Print View

Thanks Harry, you wrote, "As long as you can get the guylines to follow the natural slope of the vestibules then side to side shouldn't bother you."

How about the case where one corner is higher or lower than the other three, or two diagonal corners are higher or lower than the other two? That often seems to be the situation I face.

The Notch does seem to garner a lot of praise. Must be a good design!

Clayton Mauritzen
(GlacierRambler) - M

Locale: NW Montana
Notch Snow-Loading on 09/17/2012 19:20:36 MDT Print View

Have any of you Notch users had a chance to test how the Notch handles snow loads? It looks like an excellent design, and I think the headroom it provides is invaluable.

That said, I may need to go with something like the Duomid for my next shelter because I am looking for something that can also go deeper into the winter months.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Survey of lightweight one-person shelters? on 09/17/2012 19:44:41 MDT Print View

some snow on mine :
Notch on snow

Edited by Franco on 09/17/2012 19:45:57 MDT.

Aaron Croft
(aaronufl) - M

Locale: Colorado
Notch snow loading on 09/17/2012 19:44:59 MDT Print View

Clayton,

If you look at this thread, you'll see that Franco had the Notch out in a bit of snow:

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=56180&skip_to_post=572302

For what it's worth, I'd probably take my shangri-la over the Notch if I was expecting more than a dusting.

Edit: Franco beat me to it.

Edited by aaronufl on 09/17/2012 19:45:43 MDT.

Clayton Mauritzen
(GlacierRambler) - M

Locale: NW Montana
Re: Notch snow loading on 09/17/2012 20:13:37 MDT Print View

Franco and Aaron, thanks for the links and pics. I don't know how I missed this earlier.

As much as I like the Notch, I think it is best suited to three-season conditions. It is good to know that it can take some snow though. Even in three-season weather, we can get some nice snow.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
cricket on 09/17/2012 20:46:47 MDT Print View

the Cricket (the outer alone was called the solo trailstar) w/ the inner is worth investigating; I've been using the "tarp" portion w/ a bivy and find the shelter easy to setup, relatively roomy and weather worthy- it's available in both sil and cuben

you can adjust the entrance high or low (for stormy conditions)

the inner net can be pitched on it's own on clear neats to beat the bugs

Warren Greer
(WarrenGreer) - F

Locale: SoCal
Notch on 09/17/2012 21:46:39 MDT Print View

Don't own one but have done all the research and like it allot. My favorite choice, as it seems many see it as a total solution; great coverage, modular, only four pegs, very quick setup (http://www.tarptent.com/notch.html#videos). Something that no one mentioned is that the partial solid inner not only blocks dust but also traps heat when needed. If your sleep system winds up a bit insufficient, you can close down the vestibules more and get extra efficiency that way. And it also eliminates the splashy splashy as well. -Excellent choice and could be used as a tarp only, net tent only, or a true double wall shelter.

Diana Vann
(DianaV) - MLife

Locale: Wandering
Re: Notch vs. StratoSpire 1 on 09/18/2012 09:03:11 MDT Print View

Henry,

Thanks for pointing out that the StratoSpire 1 has more interior room than the Notch for the same packed size. Of course the extra sleeping/living space comes with the trade off of some additional weight to carry.

Does the design of either shelter offer a significant advantage in regard to wind stability and/or the ability to handle moderate snow in shoulder-seasons conditions (or the occasional snow fall that can be encountered at any time the Sierras)?

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: Re: Notch vs. StratoSpire 1 on 09/18/2012 09:39:32 MDT Print View

I am 6'1" and 215lbs. A buddy is 6'3" and 235lbs. We both own Notches (or is that Notch 'I') and both fit with room to spare in length (both use long, high loft bags) and room at the sides in the middle for gear, clothing, etc. All of the space of the Notch is usable. I would only use an SS1 (I think) if I wanted to try doubling up with my wife.

Jack Elliott
(JackElliott) - F

Locale: Bend, Oregon, USA
Sufficient width at the head and foot? on 09/18/2012 11:00:16 MDT Print View

I'm a side sleeper and dislike having the wall of the tent inches from my face. Bringing my knees up a bit toward my tummy results in knees sticking one way, feets the other way. Is the Notch wide enough at the head and foot end?

Also, in wind: is it a quiet tent?

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: Sufficient width at the head and foot? on 09/18/2012 11:26:30 MDT Print View

In my opinion, it is long enough to sleep like that. I am a side sleeper as well. If you thrash you will come in contact with the sides of the mesh, but not the outer fly so not issue with a wet bag, if that is your concern. It is a pretty long tent with vertical ends so the space is usable. I sleep on a synmat UL7 without losing any meaning full volume within the shelter. Note that you do sleep 'close' to the mesh inner but do not touch without fear of sagging in your face. The outer is much farther away as the inner hangs from the outer. The modified 'diamond' shape helps to give much usable space in this case.

Compared to the SS1, the Notch has less volume but also takes up less space and is measurably lighter. It is really a matter of where your priorities lie. The Notch is not a huge solo tent but yet has the most room I have ever had in a solo tent. But it is a solo tent....

Jack Elliott
(JackElliott) - F

Locale: Bend, Oregon, USA
SOTM Report not helpful on 09/19/2012 09:05:16 MDT Print View

Well, the State of the Market Report on solo+ tents came out http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=68397&skip_to_post=584494#584494 and it's less than whelming. Not helpful.

So now that that's over, I reckon I'll probably get a Notch -- a tent not reviewed in the report, but getting love here.

Many thanks all for contributing.