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Luke Khuu
(ninhsavestheday)
10-20F Clothing List on 09/13/2012 02:03:48 MDT Print View

This is my plan gear list for 10-20F Sierra. Please help me to be reasonable and to go lighter.


Clothing
Marmot Precip
Golite Roan Plateau 800
REI 200 Fleece
REI Midweight base layer long-sleeve
CloudVeil Softshell pants
REI Lightweight base layer pants
Wigwam socks
Seal Skinz socks (sleeping only)
Patagonia Cap 4 (sleeping only)
Glove Liner
OR PL 400
Waterproof Mittens
Polar Fleece Balaclava
Mountain Hardwear Dome Perignon Beanie
OR Mtn Gaiters

Sleeping
GG 3/8 Pad
ThermaRest Prolite Plus
JRB Hudson River 20F
Sea to Summit Reactor Extreme (helps with cold spots)

Edited by ninhsavestheday on 09/14/2012 10:16:18 MDT.

Andy F
(AndyF) - M
Re: 10-20F Clothing List on 09/13/2012 10:20:30 MDT Print View

I'd prefer wool over Seal Skinz for sleeping so that my feet can dry out.

Are you using a hammock? Your system seems about right for a hammock, but I think you need more insulation underneath in that case.

If you're sleeping on the ground, I think you could drop the Cap 4. But, in the winter, it's always better to have too much clothing than not enough.

One pair of wigwam socks seems inadequate. Also, what about a waterproof layer for the footwear?

Luke Khuu
(ninhsavestheday)
Re: Re: 10-20F Clothing List on 09/13/2012 11:23:20 MDT Print View

I'll be sleeping on the floor.

I have trail runners, and I was thinking about putting on sealskinz as an extra layer if I have to.

Tjaard Breeuwer
(Tjaard) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota, USA
Shell? on 09/13/2012 12:57:43 MDT Print View

I would take a windshirt.
If it really is below 25, snow will be dry enough to slide off a smooth windshirt and you might be able to leave the rainjacket at home. If you are out on a longer trip or the weather looks like it might be damp, bring both the rain and windshell.

Scenario:
20F, headwind, sunny:
If you hike in your base plus fleece you still freeze in front from the wind, yet you boil in the back.
If you hike in your base plus rain jacket you sweat to much, leaving you chilled later.
If you hike in your base plus windshirt you stay comfy in the front, and only sweat under your pack.


With synthetic base layers and a windshirt, I would leave the sleap shirt behind, you can always sleep in your fleece if your baselayer is damp.

What about sunglasses?

So you are hiking in just trail runners and sealskins? No gaiters?

I find a windstoipper hat like the Dome to warm to hike in anything but the coldest and windiest weahter, also it's annoying because it muffles sound. With that in mind, are you comfortable hiking in the balaclava when it's warmer than about 15F?

I would second the wool socks for sleeping over the sealskinz, you want to give your feet time to dry out sometime in the 24hrs.

Edited by Tjaard on 09/13/2012 13:03:50 MDT.

Luke Khuu
(ninhsavestheday)
Re: Shell? on 09/14/2012 10:18:02 MDT Print View

Thank you for the advise on the windshirt. Which one do you recommend? (besides a houdini)

Charles P
(mediauras) - F

Locale: Terra
Re: Re: Shell? on 09/14/2012 11:25:01 MDT Print View

It seems like this windshirt could work really well in sierra winter conditions, which can be fairly wet. I have no experience with it, was just chcking it out recently.

http://www.montbell.us/products/disp.php?cat_id=61&p_id=2306422

I'd love to hear more from folks on their winter Sierra set-ups. The temps can vary widely (i.e, it can get warm) and it can get melty and wet. Its hard to imagine not having a shell, but I don't have any experience with snow camping/ carrying more than a daypack.

Edited by mediauras on 09/14/2012 11:26:38 MDT.

Tjaard Breeuwer
(Tjaard) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota, USA
Windshirts on 09/14/2012 22:59:06 MDT Print View

I did not mean to suggest leaving a hardshell behind unless you are only out for a short time and know it will not be above freezing.

As far as which windshirt... I am partial to one with a hood. Just got a Stoic one, light and cheap and fits great for tall slim people. Montbell Tachyon is also light and cheap, other than that you can check out the STOTM report for an intro on a few different ones as well as their use.

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/2012_windshirts_sotmr_part1.html