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Looking to go lighter still
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Jason Darby
(simmerup) - M
Hadron Anorak on 09/10/2012 17:27:10 MDT Print View

According to another post here on BPL, the fill weights for the Hadron are as follows:

• Hadron Down Anorak – Men’s – 2.3oz
• Hadron Down Anorak – Women’s – 2.1oz

I'm not sure if that's for a medium or large though.

For what it's worth, I used a Hadron Anorak (size L, 7.6 oz on my scale) this past week in the Maroon Bells to keep my head warm while sleeping in my quilt. I was plenty warm with it.

Just for some context, I was using a 30* quilt under an MLD Trailstar. I had a long sleeve lightweight baselayer and a beanie on in addition to the Hadron. Temps were in the mid 30s, and I actually slept with my arms and shoulders (and head) outside of the quilt and the hadron kept me plenty warm.

Kenneth Jacobs
(f8less) - F

Locale: Midwest
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Experience on 09/10/2012 17:46:33 MDT Print View

Nice! I like this site!

When you say "Long Trail" pack, you mean what you pack for long trips? If you're not UL, then that makes me a tank. I don't think 12lbs is anything to shake a stick at. I'm just hoping to get to 15lbs any time soon.

I will do some thinking comparing you list to mine and ponder how I'd feel without certain things.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Experience on 09/10/2012 18:00:54 MDT Print View

Long Trail as in THE Long Trail :)
http://www.greenmountainclub.org/page.php?id=2

MA border to Canadian border through vermont 272mi

12 is a bit lighter than I was for that actually. i had a heavier tent and slightly heavier sleeping pad. plus phone and camera chargers i dont normally bring.

i'll be hiking this weekend with a guy on here with 8lb base so mine will look big. I am pretty happy with where I am right now since <20lb i don't really notice in my pack

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
One thing about your fly creek on 09/10/2012 18:35:00 MDT Print View

Your UL2 should not be that heavy. If you only brought the minimum stakes (6) and ditched the ground sheet you should be able to hit the 2lb 4oz mark.

Kenneth Jacobs
(f8less) - F

Locale: Midwest
Re: Hadron Anorak on 09/10/2012 18:57:44 MDT Print View

"• Hadron Down Anorak – Men’s – 2.3oz
• Hadron Down Anorak – Women’s – 2.1oz"

Hmmm...so it's a bit lighter of a fill weight than the Zeus (3.5oz). How does the fir run? Does it also come without a hood? My plan down the line is to have a quilt with separate hood (to use with quilt or jacket).

Kenneth Jacobs
(f8less) - F

Locale: Midwest
Re: One thing about your fly creek on 09/10/2012 20:16:16 MDT Print View

Isn't minimum 7? 3 on the back (sides & center), 4 on the front (Base & Fly)?

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
fly creek on 09/10/2012 21:46:35 MDT Print View

6-7 stakes then, I use a UL1 and im at 31.9 oz (just a hair under 2 pounds). The Ul2 is 4 oz heavier.

I would probally keep the UL2 and use the money for a lighter pack and drop some serious ounces. Look into a Zpacks blast, do this last though.

If you do want to get another shelter get something sub - 1 pound where you will actually notice the weight savings, like a cuben shelter.

Jason Darby
(simmerup) - M
Re: Re: Hadron Anorak on 09/10/2012 23:37:00 MDT Print View

I believe the non-hooded version is the Hadron Down Cardigan, and I think the fill weight is 2.0oz of 850 fill down.
As far as fit goes, I usually wear a Large in outer layers, and the Hadron Anorak fits as I would expect it to. With only a t-shirt on underneath it's not too baggy, yet I can still fit it over a t-shirt and fleece (Patagonia R1 Hoody) easily with room to spare. The wrist cuffs are elastic, so it gets tight in the wrists with multiple layers, but everywhere else it is rather comfy.
The company (Stoic) describes the fit as 3D Ergonomic which doesn't really mean anything to me. I would describe it as "regular fit" as opposed to "slim fit" or "loose fit" if that helps any.

Remington Roth
(remjroth) - F

Locale: Atlantic Coast
"Tank" on 09/11/2012 08:38:03 MDT Print View

I saw your comment about being a tank.

For your reference, and others should correct me if I'm wrong, ultralight (UL) is classified as below ten pounds as a base weight; super ultralight (SUL) is below five pounds base weight; for the chosen few, extremely ultralight (XUL) is below three pounds base weight.

Now my two cents:

I think you'll find that after going on your trip you can reflect on what you actually used. For instance, I initially had a hard time bringing only one set of clothes. Then I realized I only ever used one set anyways. Take a hard look at what you really need. Question and weigh everything. Count ounces (or tenths of ounces if you're especially motivated), not pounds. Try and develop your gear list over time. I don't know about you, but I'm not made of money. Budget and chip away at your base weight. Focus on making smart purchases and maybe even dabble in making your own gear if it's cost effective (and you have the talent). Also, take full advantage of this site and read reviews, look at gear lists, and use gear swap before buying anything - you'll save yourself a lot of time and money by buying the right gear the first time. When I first started to lower my weight, I made a few purchases only to realize I bought the wrong things (and had to try and sell them later on). I'm new to this site too (I joined a month ago); I really wish I had been fortunate enough to find it sooner.

For context, my base weight progression (specifically for a March AT trip in VA):
2010 - 34 lbs
2011 - 10 lbs
2012 - 6.5 lbs

Don't feel too bad about 18 pounds as a base weight (34 is embarrassing), but try not to dwell there...

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: "Tank" on 09/11/2012 08:46:00 MDT Print View

What base weight is Super Duper Really Super Duper Ultralight or SDRSDU?

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
Xxxxxsul on 09/11/2012 08:53:59 MDT Print View

That would be a grocery bag flapping in the wind.

Andy F
(AndyF) - M

Locale: Midwest/Midatlantic
Re: Looking to go lighter still on 09/11/2012 09:02:12 MDT Print View

Ken,

Make two gear lists. One of them is what you need to survive without breaking laws or putting yourself in danger. The other is extras--what you like to have with you on a trip. Go on two day hikes, carrying all of your survive + extras gear on the first, and then carry only your bare essential overnight gear on the second.

If those hikes aren't very insightful, then go on a longer overnight trip (or car camp?) with each set of gear.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Re: Looking to go lighter still on 09/11/2012 09:14:58 MDT Print View

Yep, I can't advise shake down hikes enough. I did a bunch of hiking before I did my long trip.. a few weekend trips and a 4 day section hike. It does a lot to show you what you need/like and what you don't.

It also helps you build a routine that makes you efficient. Especially if you have gear you haven't used much before.

Dena Kelley
(EagleRiverDee) - M

Locale: Eagle River, Alaska
re Looking to go lighter still on 09/11/2012 11:31:45 MDT Print View

Remington's advice (as well as other's) is very sound. OP mentioned being raised with a "Be Prepared" mentality and I was as well. Which generally resulted in me having 3 cutting tools, 5 ways to start fire, an emergency shelter as well as my tent, 2 sets of spare clothes, etc. My initial attempt to move to a more UL style involved extreme psychological discomfort as I reduced my redundant gear. And the reality is, I never used more than one blade. I never used more than one fire starting method. I never used my space blanket. Etc. I won't leave an item behind that would affect my safety- IE I carry a first aid kit- but I have considerably reduced it from the gigantic expedition FAK to a small FAK that focuses on having the stuff I really need and none of the stuff I don't. I'm not UL yet. My base weight is 15 lbs. But considering I used to have a base weight of 40, I feel like I've made progress. :)

The best advice outside of this forum I've found is Mike Clelland's YouTube vids and Andy Skurka's blog site. I have Andy Skurka's book as well, and plan to buy Mike Clelland's book. Hikelight.com has a good (free) online book (PDF) you can download, and sample gear lists as well.

Kenneth Jacobs
(f8less) - F

Locale: Midwest
Thank you on 09/11/2012 11:41:13 MDT Print View

Thank you to everyone for all their input thus far! This is all great information you are providing. I keep working on my gear lists daily and doing more research...and most importantly, questioning myself a LOT on my "wants vs needs".

Remington Roth
(remjroth) - F

Locale: Atlantic Coast
Re: Re: "Tank" on 09/11/2012 13:31:32 MDT Print View

SDRSDU = nude trail running

Kenneth Jacobs
(f8less) - F

Locale: Midwest
Gettin' Down on 09/13/2012 23:16:16 MDT Print View

Current base pack weight is now down to 18.563lbs. from 19.650lbs. with some removals and modifications.

Edited by f8less on 09/13/2012 23:18:36 MDT.

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
good luck, you are still heavy on 09/14/2012 00:07:40 MDT Print View

Your goal now should be to cut that weight in half.

Erik Basil
(EBasil) - M

Locale: Atzlan
Re: Looking to go lighter still on 09/14/2012 07:31:43 MDT Print View

For reference, my kit is heavier than yours and I also carry redundancy in fire-starting, medical supplies and water treatment. I have had to use all three in different situations.

I see a couple of places you can shave a little, for a little:

--Compass. You've got a nice one, but check out the 24-gram Brunton Trooper. There's a thread on it in Gear Deals and I can vouch for it as an effective tool for map and XC use (also becomes your e-mirror).

--Knife/Multitool. That Mora you mention above is a cool idea, but so is a carbon or stainless-bladed Opinel #8. Large blade, under two ounces. Leathermans are beefy/heavy for what you get. I love'em, just not in my backpack.

--Folding Bucket. Okay, I carry one of these when I'm in groups, and also what you can replace it with: 2-gallon ziploc. That's large enough to fill, suds, shake and rinse with for laundry. Ounces saved.

--Tent Footprint. Personally, I don't want to buy a new tent or have a leaker, so I use one...just not the BA version. Some 2-mil painters plastic is beefy enough to last on your trip, but lighter by maybe an ounce.

To me, you have a solid kit with reliable products.

Remington Roth
(remjroth) - F

Locale: Atlantic Coast
Re: good luck, you are still heavy on 09/16/2012 08:07:59 MDT Print View

Michael is right. It's absolutely possible for you to cut that weight in half.

I noticed that you've planned to carry 1.5 lbs of food per day. I realize that food needs vary between people, but if you're planning to hike a lot, then that probably won't be enough (someone please correct me if I'm wrong!) I've taken that amount of food on a five-day AT trip over 110 miles, but that was a planned calorie deficit. I wanted to experiment with how that might feel. I purposefully gained weight in advance. Over the course of the trip, I lost six pounds. I learned that I definitely wanted to carry more food in the future. For reference, I'm 5'10 and 155-160 lbs. I imagine nine days would have been especially unhealthy for me (more so than the five days already were.)

Also, it's important to realize that the weight of packaged food is not equal to the weight of food one might have. It always surprises me how much packaging weighs (so you'll want to repackage everything.)

Perhaps you've already considered this food conversation. but there's a lot more to it. Here's a helpful link if you're interested:

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/pounds_per_person_per_day_ppppd.html