Fabric covered closed cell foam
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Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Fabric covered closed cell foam on 09/02/2012 18:37:51 MDT Print View

A number of years ago I bought a closed cell foam sleeping pad at K-Mart that had fabric (probably polyester) adhered to one side.

I like this foam/fabric combo because it resists tearing (ripping) of the foam when I make foam clothing from it.

Has anyone see anything like it recently?

The foil covered foam doesn't help with tearing much, if at all.

Edited by lyrad1 on 09/09/2012 10:31:12 MDT.

David Miles
(davidmiles) - F

Locale: Eastern Sierra
Re: Fabric covered closed cell foam on 09/08/2012 00:32:29 MDT Print View

I think what your talking about is thermo-molded foam.

There is a company in Goleta, CA called Surf-to-Summit that I visited.
Some very interesting stuff.

David Scheidt
(dscheidt) - F
Re: Fabric covered closed cell foam on 09/08/2012 07:54:29 MDT Print View

neoprene, as used for sewn goods, is usually covered with nylon tricot or similar fabric. I don't know if that's what you had or not.

You might be able to use 3M 77 spray adhesive to attach fabric to your own foam.

David Olsen
(oware)

Locale: Steptoe Butte
Re: Fabric covered closed cell foam on 09/08/2012 09:29:23 MDT Print View

I made foam mountaineering double boot liners using ccf foam with synthetic tricot on the inside and coated ripstop on the outside. Use barge cement to adhere the fabric.

Colin Krusor
(ckrusor)

Locale: Northwest US
Foam on 09/08/2012 11:19:36 MDT Print View

I've actually had pretty good results securely laminating fabric to polyester film, to cuben, and to foam with contact cement (like 3M 4693H) diluted with a solvent. I just applied the thinned cement with a brush, then stretched the fabric over the surface underneath (foam, film, etc.). I recently did this with polyester fabric and cuben, and the result is a really strong bond that is still intact even after a lot of crumpling, folding, and abrasion. If the foam you hope to laminate is polyethylene the bond might be less strong.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Fabric covered closed cell foam on 09/09/2012 10:28:08 MDT Print View

Thanks for the responses. Helpful info. You've given me a lot of ideas to try.

David M-I've seen thermo molded foam items but never knew what they were called. Thanks for getting me started with the right name for them.

David S-Yes, the neoprene is a perfect example of what I want, except for the weight. I have a neoprene hooded coat that I bought from a scuba store. It was billed as a warm up jacket. Trouble is that it weighs over 3 lbs. My goal is to replicate it with lighter foam. Thanks for the 3m77 tip.

David O-Thanks for the Barge Cement tip.

Colin-Thanks for the 3m4693H tip and the results of your experimenting.

Daryl

Edited by lyrad1 on 09/09/2012 10:30:24 MDT.

David Poston
(dgposton) - F

Locale: Texas / Colorado
Closed cell foam vs. neoprene on 09/09/2012 11:04:33 MDT Print View

Can someone explain the difference between neoprene and regular "closed cell foam"? Is neoprene simply a higher density type of closed cell foam? For the current project I'm working, I'm looking for a firm foam that resists compression and is around 1/4" to 3/8" in thickness. But I'm not sure I want the weight of neoprene.

Terry Trimble
(socal-nomad) - F

Locale: North San Diego county
neoprene on 09/09/2012 12:41:59 MDT Print View

Neoprene is closed cell rubber used in wet suits mainly. Osprey use dry land neoprene in the shoulder straps of the Talon series packs thats why you get the thin stretchy feel.
Terry

David Poston
(dgposton) - F

Locale: Texas / Colorado
Neoprene vs. crosslinked polyethylene foam on 09/09/2012 13:21:31 MDT Print View

Does neoprene have any advantage over, say, crosslinked polyethylene foam. Perhaps more flexible? I think the density of neoprene is somewhere around 6 lb/ft3 whereas crosslinked polethylene foam is around 2 lb/ft3.

Terry Trimble
(socal-nomad) - F

Locale: North San Diego county
Neoprene on 09/09/2012 14:17:50 MDT Print View

Neoprene in it's dryland form can also be bought as yoga pads at target or other places. I have looked at them they are thin and roll up nice and tight and they look like more blown form of neoprene. They might have a better clo value than same thickness of crosslinked foam or Evazote pads.

But they weigh more and will absorb some water or sweat were a Zote crosslink foam will not absorb water. Neoprene will not compact as easily compared to the a Zote or crosslinked foam.

But you do pay a real weight penalty with the neoprene pad.

It would be interesting to see a clo value comparison between zote or crosslink foam and dryland neoprene.

I have used wetsuits for many years surfing and repaired them also. When I use to do running races I would wear my short john wet suit to sweat out a few extra pounds before a race. Man it get really hot in 1/8 inch thick wetsuit when running 5 miles. I got the Idea from mom she purchased $50.00 weight loss shorts back in the late 70's they were 1/4 inch zip up neoprene shorts.
Terry

David Scheidt
(dscheidt) - F
Re: Closed cell foam vs. neoprene on 09/09/2012 19:30:53 MDT Print View

Materials. Closed cell foam is any foam, of any material, that has closed cells. That is, it's got little bubbles of gas, usually plain air, in it, that are distinct from each other. It's water proof, doesn't absorb materials, etc. Open cell foams have bubbles that are largely connected to each other. It'll absorb whatever it's in contact with. A sponge is an open celled foam, typically of cellulose. So are the foams in some sorts of self-inflating mats.

The difference between neoprene and 'ordinary' closed cell foam is one of material. Closed cells foams are normally, in our context, polyethylene, some times polyurethane. Different materials have different properties.