Forum Index » General Lightweight Backpacking Discussion » more tick borne diseases


Display Avatars Sort By:
John Nausieda
(Meander) - MLife

Locale: PNW
more tick borne diseases on 07/30/2012 10:19:30 MDT Print View

More tick borne diseases. Subtler symptoms and nasty treatments.
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/30/another-tick-borne-disease-to-guard-against/?gwh=36B475681820A74568330C4F3E136C1D

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: more tick borne diseases on 07/30/2012 10:52:19 MDT Print View

Interesting article, thanks

Prevention is the same as for Lyme disease - DEET, Permethrin on clothing, long pants/gaiters,...

They said that ticks sit on branches or grasses and wait for a human to brush against. Avoid walking through brush/grass that rubs against your legs.

I've found ticks crawling around on me a few times - after I was walking through brush/grass. Once was when I was cutting branches off the trail so I had real good contact with brush.

John S.
(jshann) - F
Re: more tick borne diseases on 07/30/2012 17:55:02 MDT Print View

http://www.cdc.gov/ticks/diseases/

In the United States, some ticks carry pathogens that can cause human disease, including:

Anaplasmosis is transmitted to humans by tick bites primarily from the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern and upper midwestern U.S. and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) along the Pacific coast.

Babesiosis is caused by microscopic parasites that infect red blood cells. Most human cases of babesiosis in the United States are caused by Babesia microti. Babesia microti is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and is found primarily in the Northeast and upper Midwest.

Ehrlichiosis is transmitted to humans by the lone star tick (Ambylomma americanum), found primarily in the southcentral and eastern U.S.

Lyme disease is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern U.S. and upper Midwestern U.S. and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) along the Pacific coast.

Rickettsia parkeri Rickettsiosis is transmitted to humans by the Gulf Coast tick (Amblyomma maculatum).

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) is transmitted by the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sangunineus) in the U.S. The brown dog tick and other tick species are associated with RMSF in Central and South America.

STARI (Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness) is transmitted via bites from the lone star tick (Ambylomma americanum), found in the southeastern and eastern U.S.

Tickborne relapsing fever (TBRF) is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected soft ticks. TBRF has been reported in 15 states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming and is associated with sleeping in rustic cabins and vacation homes.

Tularemia is transmitted to humans by the dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), the wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum). Tularemia occurs throughout the U.S.

364D Rickettsiosis (Rickettsia phillipi, proposed) is transmitted to humans by the Pacific Coast tick (Dermacentor occidentalis ticks). This is a new disease that has been found in California.

Rex Sanders
(Rex) - M

Locale: Central California Coast
Even more tick borne diseases on 08/23/2013 12:33:42 MDT Print View

Powassan virus - "Powassan viruses can be transmitted within 15 minutes of a bite. The mortality rate from Powassan infection is 10-15 percent, and survivors ... frequently have longterm neurological damage." One variety is called "deer tick virus". Mostly found in the NE US and SE Canada.

Heartland virus - Just two cases diagnosed, makes people very sick. "The tick suspected of transmitting Heartland, Amblyoma americanum, is half the size of a sesame seed". Northwest Missouri.

Borrelia miyamotoi - also not much known, related to Lyme Disease. "... two unrelated patients who came into their hospitals very ill and were both initially misdiagnosed and given antibiotics that did not work for their infections". Found in Russia, Japan, Massachusetts and New Jersey

Maybe Just Don’t Go Outside

-- Rex