Forum Index » GEAR » Lightweight tent for Norwegian conditions


Display Avatars Sort By:
Hans Kristoffer Graff
(Boffen) - F
Lightweight tent for Norwegian conditions on 07/27/2012 12:11:57 MDT Print View

Hi, I've been trying to find a lightweight tent that I can use in Norwegian conditions. A lot of the tarp/tent makers seem to be from places in the US and cater to hikers who hike in milder weather than the Norwegian norm, and I really do not want to wake up in the middle of the night finding my tent dislodged from the ground due to strong mountain winds. With that said, I am by no means an "extreme hiker", I probably won't even use it if there's snow.

I've been looking at both lightweight conventional tents and ultralight varieties, but I'm not really sure what to choose:

- I'm fairly tall at 192cm
- I need something with an inner net/tent. I'm the kind of guy who never get's itchy or anything from bug bites, but a week long camping trip last week at Hardangervidda would've been pretty unbearable if we didn't have a constant fire, and an inner tent.
- I want something with a vestibule-esque feature for cooking and storing stuff.


A lot of people seem to like the DuoMid, which I must admit looks excellent. I like how it seems big enough for me to sit out a bad weather spell, has room enough for equipment storage outside and cooking. I've however read some mixed opinions on its wind resistance. I've also looked at the Helsport Ringstind light 2, which has the added benefit of fitting two people, and a construction I feel is pretty wind-resistant. It is however about 1 kg heavier than the DuoMid with an Oookwork inner, and I'm not sure how easy it'd be to pack in a pack like the ULA Catalyst (I haven't settled completely on a backpack yet, but the Catalyst is the number one contender right now).

Thanks in advance,
Hans

Peter Fokkinga
(nitto)

Locale: the Netherlands
Re: Lightweight tent for Norwegian conditions on 07/27/2012 14:02:48 MDT Print View

The Duomid seems to do well in Scotland which can have strong winds and little cover to shield your camp. I think that when you pitch it close to the ground the walls will flex, but it'll stay put.

I would ask Sean whether you'll fit the Oooknest though. If you are interested in a lightly used (three weeks), good as new Oooknest with Chikara floor drop me a PM. The Duomid nest very nice, but in hindsight I think I would be happier with the smaller Nano, leaving an even larger vestibule.

As an alternative, did you consider the Hilleberg Una, with an inner from Sean? Standard the Una does not have a vestibule, but a very large inner. Sean's inner is about half as deep so you do get a vestibule. Heavier than a Duomid though, and more expensive.

Craig Rowland
(craigr) - MLife

Locale: Pacific NW
Hilleberg on 07/27/2012 14:10:15 MDT Print View

Buy a Hilleberg (designed by your neighbors in Sweden). I carry a Hilleberg Akto in a Catalyst pack and it fits well and can deal with very bad weather. I used it hiking in the Norwegian fjords last year and it had no problems with the winds there above treeline.

Edited by craigr on 07/27/2012 14:10:59 MDT.

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: Lightweight tent for Norwegian conditions on 07/27/2012 14:41:46 MDT Print View

I would look at the Tarptent Scarp. With the crossing poles it will handle wind and snow much better than the Akto. Dual vestibules and dual doors even on the solo model (there is a Tarptent Scarp). Both very light for the performance and are proven in the conditions you describe.

David McBride
(VintageGent) - F

Locale: Galveston TX
Tarptent on 07/27/2012 21:17:37 MDT Print View

For what it's worth, I used by Tarptent Squall with no troubles during a six-day trip on the Kungsleden in Arctic Sweden. I have to imagine the conditions there are similar to what you'd encounter.

Hans Kristoffer Graff
(Boffen) - F
Akto and Scarp on 07/28/2012 05:09:10 MDT Print View

Hilleberg tents are too expensive for me (they don't even seem to have an official importer in Norway), but as I mentioned in my first post, I've looked at the Helsport Ringstind Light 2, which is a two man tent similar to the akto at 1.7 kg, and I could probably shave some grams off that by swapping the stakes. The one person Scarp would be quite a bit lighter, but doesn't have a complete inner, which leads me to believe that there could probably be some condensation issues (especially as I radiate heat, both sleeping and awake). All of these tents lacks a sizable vestibule though, and I imagine that backpacks and footwear could easily get when in the rain/when there's lots of condensation.


The Ringstind light:

http://www.helsport.no/en/product/TENTS/PRO/Ringstind%20Light

Neil Johnstone
(nsjohnstone) - MLife
Lightweight tent for Norwegian conditions on 07/28/2012 06:01:56 MDT Print View

Platou always seem to have Hilleberg tents in stock, but NOK 4350 for an Akto is a bit much, especially when compared to the cost of the Ringstind Light.

The Ringstind has more headroom than the Akto, which would probably be better for you (at 180cm I have cannot sit upright on an Exped pad in an Akto) as well. I had an older version of the Ringstind and it worked well (although I sold it as I am just too used to the Akto).

The MLD Trailstar has quite a following in the UK, with a suitable inner, such as the Oookworks one, so it would be suitable. I am not completely convinced though - an Akto/Ringstind goes up as one piece quickly and easily, so the convenience is worth the extra weight. I have used both a mid and a SMD Lunar Solo on Hardangervidda and now will only use an Akto, so make your own conclusions!

And I have always found the vestibule of the Akto big enough for gear storage and cooking.

Mark Roberts
(redwedge) - MLife

Locale: Lapland
DuoMid / Akto on 07/28/2012 07:26:16 MDT Print View

I use a DuoMid w/OookNest in Lapland, summer and winter. I've yet to encounter winds strong enough to knock it down, but I believe it does have an upper limit beyond which you really shouldn't be using it in the open.

That said, I can see the benefits of something sturdier and (in winter) quicker to erect. I've had an Akto too, and while it's a great tent, it's reliance on stakes makes it less suitable for winter here.

If I were looking for a "tent" tent, I'd probably save up and get a Hilleber Soulo. Tarptents are great, but if I wanted something bombproof and made for up here, HIlleberg know what they're doing.

At the moment I'm looking at a Black Diamond Firstlight for winter use, but as a single wall shelter it's probably not what you're after.

Roger B
(rogerb) - MLife

Locale: Here and there
Re: Lightweight tent for Norwegian conditions on 07/28/2012 07:46:57 MDT Print View

Take à look at the Tarptent Moment with the liner and the extra pole. Otherwise any pyramid with a liner will work. eg BD Megalight or MLD Supermid.

Edited by rogerb on 07/28/2012 07:48:04 MDT.

Stuart .
(lotuseater) - M

Locale: Where the air is thin
Soulo may be too short on 07/28/2012 07:50:36 MDT Print View

Aside from Hans Kristoffer's price concerns with Hilleberg, at 192 cm / 6'5" tall I think he would find the Soulo too short. I have and swear by my Soulo for winter conditions. I'm 5'9" and there's plenty of space for me. A medium size DownMat fits with length to spare, but the large wide version (78" long) takes the entire inner tent footprint. The walls of the inner tent slope inwards and reduce usable headroom. It's manageable but may not be particularly comfortable. Of the solo Hillebergs, the Unna has the most space, but - if price were no constraint - I'd recommend sleeping diagonally in the Nammatj 2 instead.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: Lartnec Nagihcim
Re: Soulo may be too short on 07/28/2012 07:57:27 MDT Print View

Stuart is spot on here, the Soulo would definitely be too short, the Scarp 1 should be Ok but you would need to confirm with Tarp Tent.

I have both and the Scarp is far roomier.

Hans Kristoffer Graff
(Boffen) - F
Re: Re: Lightweight tent for Norwegian conditions on 07/28/2012 09:35:29 MDT Print View

I really like the look of the Tarptent Moment, and even with the optional liner it's pretty affordable. Do you think the interior hight is high enough for me to sit in? Also, how would it fare in stronger winds?

I also took a look at the MLD Trailstar, and while it looks good, I really like the ease of use a zipper gives all of the other tents. In rain and windy conditions I would imagine it hard to get in and out of since I'd have to basically crawl under the tarp.

One thing I really like about the Trailstar and the DuoMid is that they both seem very dog friendly when paired with an inner. I've had dogs all my life, and I imagine I'd like to get one when I'm done with my studies and ready to settle down. I haven't even written my bachelor's paper yet though, and plan on getting a master's degree eventually, so by then I can probably afford another tent :)

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: Re: Re: Lightweight tent for Norwegian conditions on 07/28/2012 10:00:31 MDT Print View

Scarp with crossing poles will do much better in the wind than the Moment and DuoMid. I have used all three.

Paul Hatfield
(clear_blue_skies) - F
Complete inner? on 07/28/2012 11:42:16 MDT Print View

> The one person Scarp would be quite a bit lighter, but doesn't have a complete inner

I don't understand your comment. Both the Scarp 1 and 2 are double wall tents, right?

James Klein
(jnklein21) - M

Locale: Southeast
Golite shangri-la on 07/28/2012 11:46:10 MDT Print View

I would consider this one as well. Cheap, sturdy, roomy and light.

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: Complete inner? on 07/28/2012 11:53:47 MDT Print View

Yes, the Scarp is fully double walled with the option of a mesh or fabric inner tent.

Paul Hatfield
(clear_blue_skies) - F
Norwegian conditions on 07/28/2012 12:42:19 MDT Print View

> Hi, I've been trying to find a lightweight tent that I can use in Norwegian
> conditions. A lot of the tarp/tent makers seem to be from places in the US and
> cater to hikers who hike in milder weather than the Norwegian norm

On a humorous note, I'm going to guess that the area of land in the US which elevation is higher than the highest peak in Norway (Galdhøpiggen at 2469 m / 8100 ft) exceeds than the *entire* area of Norway.

Tord Nilsen
(tonito) - F
Choose a Scandinavian producer... on 07/28/2012 12:44:37 MDT Print View

My advice to you is to choose a Scandinavian producer and forget about the extra 1 kg weight...
That is, in my experience, nothing else can't handel the weather.
This summer I have tried:
Moutain Hardware Skyledge 2.1, - to cold and to much draft.
MSR Hubba Hubba - Got wet
Fjellheimen 2 camp, worked well
Storsylen x-treme, worked very well
MH something 3-persons, worked so-so.

I used this tent in Norwegian mountains, the problem as I see it is with the dome tent, that the outer shell does not go all the way down. Both wind and rain got underneath the shell and my down sleepingbag got wet. I was not very happy....

Mark Roberts
(redwedge) - MLife

Locale: Lapland
Re: Norwegian conditions on 07/28/2012 13:17:43 MDT Print View

"> Hi, I've been trying to find a lightweight tent that I can use in Norwegian
> conditions. A lot of the tarp/tent makers seem to be from places in the US and
> cater to hikers who hike in milder weather than the Norwegian norm

On a humorous note, I'm going to guess that the area of land in the US which elevation is higher than the highest peak in Norway (Galdhøpiggen at 2469 m / 8100 ft) exceeds than the *entire* area of Norway."


Heh... But of course the mountains in Norway often emerge straight from sea level, unlike those American "mountains" which start half way up ;)

That reminds me of a Finn who once told me that "although the mountains in Norway are higher, ours are much older."

Peter Fokkinga
(nitto)

Locale: the Netherlands
Re: Re: Norwegian conditions on 07/28/2012 14:17:13 MDT Print View

> Heh... But of course the mountains in Norway often emerge straight from sea level,
> unlike those American "mountains" which start half way up ;)

Can't compare to the American mountains, but when I was in Norway last month I was reminded of Swiss alps, even though these are twice the height...

This year there's much more snow than usual (the locals told me) and the Sognefjellet, which is a pass at altitude 4000', was a plateau of snow and frozen lakes, surrounded by white peaks and glaciers. Pretty amazing (or amazingly pretty).