A Survey of Water Hazards and Water Treatment Methods - Part 1
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Maia
(maia) - MLife

Locale: Rocky Mountains
A Survey of Water Hazards and Water Treatment Methods - Part 1 on 07/24/2012 15:53:28 MDT Print View

Companion forum thread to:

A Survey of Water Hazards and Water Treatment Methods - Part 1

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: A Survey of Water Hazards and Water Treatment Methods - Part 1 on 07/24/2012 16:11:56 MDT Print View

More on the subject

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/backcountry_water_quality_technologies_trends_paranoia


http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/sipping_water_drinking_untreated_backcountry_water.html

Edited by kthompson on 07/24/2012 16:13:55 MDT.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: A Survey of Water Hazards and Water Treatment Methods - Part 1 on 07/24/2012 16:52:56 MDT Print View

Nice article Roger, I'm looking forward to part 2 and 3.

I am surprised there is any more that can be said on the subject : )

Will Rietveld
(WilliWabbit) - MLife

Locale: Southwest Colorado
Re: A Survey of Water Hazards and Water Treatment Methods - Part 1 on 07/24/2012 19:01:38 MDT Print View

Excellent overview Roger, concise and understandable.

One summer I decided to not treat water and instead choose water from the purest sources. That included water running from snowdrifts. Well, I got sick after two consecutive trips. It wasn't Giardia because the symptoms came on soon after I got back and only lasted a day or two. It was early summer and my theory is the meltwater contained a variety of bugs captured in the snow, enough to make one sick. I have since treated my drinking water.

Kurt Lammers
(lammers8) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Fantastic as always on 07/25/2012 10:55:27 MDT Print View

My favorite kind of BPL article, can't wait to read parts 2 & 3. Cheers.

mitchell Keil
(mkeil)

Locale: Surf City
Here Here on 07/25/2012 11:54:20 MDT Print View

Well done intro to the subject. Can't wait for the follow up articles. Having just experienced LG up close this year, I have a keen interest in the subject and look forward especially to Part III. LG is something one wants to avoid in the future once you have experienced the "fun" that the infestation provides.

Dean F.
(acrosome) - MLife

Locale: Back in the Front Range
worms on 07/25/2012 12:10:53 MDT Print View

Necator americanus is my favorite parasite, I must admit. Primarily because it's Linnaean name means "American killer." Heh, heh.

But Ascaris worms scare me more- they can burrow anywhere in your body. They've been found in people's brains, scrota, etc. Ew. (My medical school had an unusually comprehensive parasitology curriculum...)

Edited by acrosome on 07/25/2012 12:11:33 MDT.

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: worms on 07/25/2012 12:55:52 MDT Print View

I saw Prometheus last night. I have decided that I don't like worms.

HK Newman
(hknewman) - MLife

Locale: Western US
Re: A Survey of Water Hazards and Water Treatment Methods - Part 1 on 07/25/2012 18:39:04 MDT Print View

Getting water that hasn't passed through agricultural, industrial, or residential areas can lead to carrying your water in many hikes in the desert (hiking along the Verde River in Arizona's Maltazal for example, or the eastern, less visited parts of Big Bend NP in Texas).

Then again all wild water isn't pristine. One hot summer trip, we filtered water out of a creek (not much else was left) and then found a dead elk carcass festering upstream in the same water. Fresh water right out a spring will work for me, though.

Tim Drescher
(timdcy) - M

Locale: Gore Range
Re: A Survey of Water Hazards and Water Treatment Methods - Part 1 on 07/26/2012 04:08:13 MDT Print View

Excellent job at injecting humor into the article! I’m glad to see a very noteworthy and sometimes overlooked topic being discussed here.

This certainly peaks my interest being that my educational and professional background is in the water treatment industry. Sewerage is a word I don’t hear too often. I’d be interested in knowing why you’re so certain the virus you received some years ago was from your local wastewater treatment facility. It sounds as if the same removal limits are not as stringent in Australia as what is handed down from the EPA, to the 50 States, and then to local municipalities. Most of our problems in the states come from non-point sources.

T N
(tordnado) - MLife

Locale: Europe
www.bwtechnologies.com? on 08/24/2012 01:44:43 MDT Print View

Edit: Sorry about the double post!

Any chance the author or someone else could comment on the www.bwtechnologies.com ability to take away potential chemicals from rivers with farmlands and possibly factoires upstreams? I´ve looked at their webpage and the tests but it does not really tell me if it would be useful or not. Where I´m hiking the majority of my hikes I can choose between safe sources such as taps or well but that means carrying 3-5 liters or take water from rivers or creeks with chemicals from farmlands. That is why I am so keen on understanding the potential of the www.bwtechnologies.com.

Thanks in advance.

Edited by tordnado on 08/24/2012 01:46:52 MDT.

Buck Nelson
(Colter) - MLife

Locale: Alaska
Great article, giardia infectious dose on 09/10/2012 11:10:30 MDT Print View

I've been researching this whole topic a lot recently. One thing I found is that giardias infectious dose is lower than 10 cysts, depite what is repeated in many sources, including some medical literature.

The FDA says one or more cysts may cause disease
Another researcher said There is no biological reason why single cysts of Giardia would not also be infectious.
The source of all the 10+ cyst estimates apparently come from one study from which I show a key chart here.

It's easy to see that the minimum infectious dose is less than 10 cysts.

Giardia is found in the animals mentioned and in most species of wild mammals and many species of birds.

Edited by Colter on 09/10/2012 11:50:22 MDT.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: A Survey of Water Hazards and Water Treatment Methods - Part 1 on 09/12/2012 02:21:30 MDT Print View

Hi Tim and all

Lengthy delay in answering: we are just back from 2 months walking the Via Alpina Purple route in Europe.

> why you’re so certain the virus you received some years ago was from your local
> wastewater treatment facility.
I subsequently found out that both the very ancient and severely overloaded plant and the river downstream from it were appallingly notorious for this.

But it was not a 'local' wastewater treatment facility, it was the plant for a medium country town. The town council (ie the ratepayers) could see no reason to do anything about it as it would cost them (the ratepayers) lots of money. It was not a problem for them,. Ah, but the river drained into the main water supply dam for Sydney: the State capital, with over 5 million people. However, neither the State Gov't nor Sydney Water could force the town to do anything about it. In the end, the State government had to build a complete replacement plant out of the State budget. I imagine the town council had a party over that.

Politics.
Cheers