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Gary Dunckel
(Zia-Grill-Guy) - MLife

Locale: Boulder
Trail Designs 12-10 stove question on 07/23/2012 13:29:12 MDT Print View

Could one of you please help me out? I am making a pot support for Anna O'Leary, and I need to know the height of the Trail Designs 12-10 alcohol stove (the height of the the top rim). Anybody sitting next to his/her 12-10 that could do a quick measurement for me? Many thanks!

BER ---
(BER) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
12-10 height on 07/23/2012 13:39:21 MDT Print View

Gary,

I just so happen to have my new Tri-Ti Sidewinder Inferno and kit next to my desk. Having read Eric expound on the system so many times, I finally had to try one...and from the initial burns it seems to be as good as he has always said. Damn. Now I have to sell my Emberlit mini... :)

The 12-10 measures 1.5" in height at the top rim. I don't know if there is much variance, but I would bet they are all pretty similar.

Brian

Edited by BER on 07/23/2012 13:42:36 MDT.

Gary Dunckel
(Zia-Grill-Guy) - MLife

Locale: Boulder
12-10 height on 07/23/2012 13:45:44 MDT Print View

Thanks so much, Brian! That is perfect for the 2.5" pot stand she needs for her other stove setups. You're my new hero!

Diane Pinkers
(dipink) - M

Locale: Western Washington
Another 12-10 stove question on 07/23/2012 13:54:14 MDT Print View

I would like to find some light way to snuff a burning 12-10 stove. I haven't been able to think of a can that I could cut off and drop over a burning stove to be able to pour fuel back into my fuel cannister. I've had a couple of times when I vastly overestimated how much fuel I'd need for a particular amount of water, and have had to just let the stove burn itself out. Any thoughts?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Another 12-10 stove question on 07/23/2012 14:01:55 MDT Print View

I snuff mine with aluminum foil. I took a piece about 8"x4" and folded it in half so that it is about 4"x4". While the burner is cold, you mold the aluminum foil over it to get a loose fit. Then it will work when the burner is burning. The foil might deform a bit when carried, but it is easy to reform it for use. You can use the snuffer foil as a protective cap on the burner while carried.

Also, as you practice more on the fuel quantity, you will get closer to the right amount, so there is less fuel and fire to snuff.

--B.G.--

Diane Pinkers
(dipink) - M

Locale: Western Washington
practice on 07/23/2012 14:05:28 MDT Print View

Oh, yes, practice will enable me to be more fuel efficient. I bought a new pot and the Ti-Tri Sidewinder, so it's a little different than using last year's set up. Once in a while I'll try something new, like popping Jiffy Pop over my cone, and not know how much to put in the stove. Did that, would have been nice to just snuff it once I was done, however.

Nathan Stuart
(forest.)

Locale: Hunter Valley - Australia
Snuffing stove on 07/23/2012 18:15:24 MDT Print View

Just use your pot lid. I have a fosters set and the can lid works fine for putting the burning stove out. Just make sure you hold it there for about 5-10 seconds as I've had mine re-ignite if I just snuff and pull the cover straight off.

I use a small panadol baby syringe to suck excess fuel out of mine(it's like a blunt 5ml syringe, not pointed. You get them with baby medication to squirt in there mouth)
I think it weighs a whole 2g and I never had much luck pouring fuel back out of my 12-10 stove..... to many holes.....

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Trail Designs 12-10 stove question on 07/23/2012 18:25:29 MDT Print View

Snuffing and recovering..
This is how I do it with various alcohol stoves including the 10-12
Snuff and recover
Skip to 3 min ..
Franco

Robert Kelly
(QiWiz) - MLife

Locale: UL gear @ QiWiz.net
Re: Another 12-10 stove question on 07/23/2012 18:31:07 MDT Print View

@ Diane "I would like to find some light way to snuff a burning 12-10 stove. I haven't been able to think of a can that I could cut off and drop over a burning stove to be able to pour fuel back into my fuel cannister. I've had a couple of times when I vastly overestimated how much fuel I'd need for a particular amount of water, and have had to just let the stove burn itself out. Any thoughts?"

I have made a snuffer/dipper cup out of the bottom of an Arizona tea can. Just use a bit of tape to make a handle.

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: Trail Designs 12-10 stove question on 07/23/2012 22:28:28 MDT Print View

Sorry I didn't get back to you Gary I was away all day,so thanks to everyone who helped:)

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: Re: Another 12-10 stove question on 06/24/2013 20:25:28 MDT Print View

The other day I saw a 12-10 stove and a pot with soot on it. It is located in Gear Swap Thread

Look at the stoves intake air holes. It looks as if flames have been coming out the air holes. On my 12-10 the flame comes out the top and the inner holes have the small flames come out of them and those holes have the same look as the ones that we see on the intake holes in the photo. The person selling the kit never used it and did not address the stove question that I posted. Have any of you experienced the discoloration around the intake holes and soot on the bottom of your pot? What could be causing it, too much fuel initially?

 photo 12-10SOOT_zps2fbe4cb5.jpg

James DeGraaf
(jdegraaf) - MLife

Locale: Bay Area
Re: Re: Re: Another 12-10 stove question on 06/24/2013 22:55:33 MDT Print View

A couple thoughts come to mind. First a question; is that a silicone "beer band" around the 12-10 stove? It looks like it's covering the inlet to some of the holes.
Soot: wrong kind of fuel would be my first guess. Your thoughts on over filling would be my second guess. Those both explain the effects but don't tend to happen simultaneously. I'll have to check my 12-10 stoves now to see if I've got that happening to any of them and if I could explain why.
-James

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: Re: Re: Another 12-10 stove question on 06/25/2013 04:33:27 MDT Print View

Yeah, I made several that failed and looked like that.
Three possible problems with the stove.
1) Overfilling (mentioned)
2) The WG used in it or blended with the fuel (mentioned)
3) The inner chimney was incorrectly sealed or broke seal

This problem is caused by fuel getting between the inner and outer walls. Sometimes similar can be seen if the person who owned it attempted to blow it out. This will force flames out the air vents. Possibly, he might have over filled the stove then placed the pot directly ON the stove, accounting for the soot. Isopropynol will also create a lot of soot.

There is likely nothing wrong with the stove that a little JB weld placed along the bottom and seam of the inner chumney won't correct. SLX or HEET are my prefered fuels...recommended.

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: Re: Re: Re: Another 12-10 stove question on 06/25/2013 06:33:28 MDT Print View

Diane said:I've had a couple of times when I vastly overestimated how much fuel I'd need for a particular amount of water, and have had to just let the stove burn itself out.

How does a 12-10 react when left outside a cone to burn off a lot of remaining fuel? Does it become pressurized to a degree that flames are forced out the incoming air holes? I envision it to be a ball of flames once overheated.

I agree with 3) The inner chimney was incorrectly sealed or broke seal.

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
Another 12-10 stove question on 06/25/2013 06:52:20 MDT Print View

Seems you'd really have to overfill the 12-10. I always recover my unused fuel, not very hard to do. Just let the stove cool a minute or two after blowing the flame out or covering with your upside down pot, pour the fuel while eyeing the holes in the outer band so the fuel gets directed into your fuel bottle. Neat to see how little fuel is used to boil 1.5-2 cups of water depending on the meal.
Duane

Dan Durston
(dandydan) - M

Locale: Cascadia
Recovering fuel on 06/25/2013 09:20:03 MDT Print View

A nice way to recover fuel is sucking it out with one of the Packafeather fuel caps:

http://packafeather.com/fuelbottle.html

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Recovering fuel on 06/25/2013 10:56:30 MDT Print View

+1 on the Packafeather cap. Just make sure you fuel bottle is flexible enough.

And, in case you missed it, Franco Darioli's post above is relevant. A snuffer top is a good thing, and it serves well for recovery.

(Blowing into a cup of burning alcohol is bad juju.)

Edited by greg23 on 06/25/2013 11:10:33 MDT.

Dan Durston
(dandydan) - M

Locale: Cascadia
Snuffing on 06/25/2013 14:47:00 MDT Print View

With the 12-10 you can snuff with any flat surface (ie. bottom of pot, mug) but it's a bit tricky and usually takes a few tries because the flame can reverse and come out the sides. Better is something like a fry pan lid or a metal mug, which snuff perfectly and they don't require carrying an extra item.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Trail Designs 12-10 stove question on 06/25/2013 15:59:57 MDT Print View

This is what I use.
12-10 plus snuffer
just shape some thick or doubled up foil over the burner, cut the extra bits and you are done.
Snuff the flame, wait for a minute then turn it upside down to recover fuel.
Easy to make, very cheap and only a few grams.
(this to save you watching the video clip...)