Old school metal cups
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Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Old school metal cups on 07/22/2012 23:00:01 MDT Print View

I ran across a couple old aluminum cups lately and was surprised when I compared them. The one on the left is a titanium Evernew 400. Next is a Bulldog brand (made in England) aluminum mug that holds 450ml brimming full and the one on the far right is a non-name aluminum 16oz kitchen measuring cup.

Which one is the heaviest?

Metal cups

Brett Rasmussen
(ascientist) - MLife

Locale: Grants Pass, Oregon
Re: Old school metal cups on 07/23/2012 00:19:39 MDT Print View

My guess is the titanium or you would not have asked the question:) I think aluminum is under appreciated in non-high temperature usage (wood fire). That said I was reading a very old camping book awhile ago that was raving about the marvels of aluminum cookware, which was state of the art at the time. The book described aluminum pots as being virtually indestructible and having superior longevity used over an open fire. Strange considering at the time they were replacing steel or cast iron. Personally I think outdoor gear opinions are very influenced by what is being sold.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Old school metal cups on 07/23/2012 01:08:39 MDT Print View

My guess is that the heaviest is the measuring cup and the lightest is the one in the middle.
Reason is that the wall thickness looks about the same and aluminium is lighter than Ti.
(hard to tell the weight of the handle on the measuring cup...)
Franco

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Old school metal cups on 07/23/2012 01:14:29 MDT Print View

All are 1.9 ounces :)

b willi jones
(mrjones) - F

Locale: best place in the world !?
cup half full? cup half empty on 07/23/2012 04:03:42 MDT Print View

this is BPL man, you are supposed to ask which cup is the lightest

Jon Hancock
(bigjackbrass)

Locale: Northwest England
Re: Re: Old school metal cups on 07/23/2012 09:30:28 MDT Print View

" The book described aluminum pots as being virtually indestructible and having superior longevity used over an open fire. Strange considering at the time they were replacing steel or cast iron."

Aside from the cast iron (fine for canoe packhorse trips, not so good on foot) a lot of the cookware around that time, especially things like cups and coffee pots, was soldered tin. It had a number of admirable qualities, but the solder melted at a considerably lower temperature than a decent campfire could achieve, which meant that the bottom dropping out of your coffee pot was a common problem. Aluminium may have dented easily, but it remained functional and could be easily formed into seamless vessels. And then the complaints about aluminium cups burning your lips started... :-)

Edited by bigjackbrass on 07/23/2012 09:33:26 MDT.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Re: Old school metal cups on 07/23/2012 10:57:59 MDT Print View

I think it is interesting that aluminum was once as expensive as gold or platinum. There are items from the collections of the Russian Czars made with the care and craftsmanship of the finest silver, but rendered in aluminum. It wasn't until there were good sources of bauxite ore and the modern electric-based smelting process was developed that aluminum became practical for industrial use.

John Almond
(FLRider) - F

Locale: The Southeast
Re: Re: Re: Re: Old school metal cups on 07/23/2012 12:24:42 MDT Print View

Yep. And the reason it was so expensive is the same reason it's so attractive as an outdoor material: it forms oxygen bonds really easily. So easily that it's hard to separate without a lot of heat. Which means that when it oxidates, it retains that oxide as a surface to prevent further oxidation, which means that your camp mug lasts a lifetime (well, assuming that you don't stomp on it some night going to the restroom in the dark).

Still and all, I prefer aluminum to titanium for cost effectiveness at similar weight. It might require a bit more care to avoid dents, but not enough to make the difference in price attractive to me.

Brian UL
(MAYNARD76)

Locale: New England
Re: Old school metal cups on 07/23/2012 12:32:35 MDT Print View

I never understood when sellers didn't ofter aluminum versions of their ti mugs.
An aluminum version would be just as light but cost a couple of dollars. I think the high price of titanium gives it a mystic and a feeling of preciousness- all selling pints for some people. I always thought an aluminum trappers mug would be great, but in titanium its too much money for what it does.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Old school metal cups on 07/23/2012 12:57:02 MDT Print View

That Bulldog mug would be a good start for the trapper mug concept, less the handle of course. I'm sure the Chinese could whip them out for pennies. I have a mind to cut and roll the handle on the mixing cup to leave just enough loop to lift it off a stove.

The titanium cup *is* the tougher of the bunch by far.

Elliott Wolin
(ewolin) - MLife

Locale: Hampton Roads, Virginia
RE: Old school metal cups on 07/28/2012 11:36:50 MDT Print View

My old Boy Scout Aluminum cup weighs 30g. It came from a circa 1965 Boy Scout mess kit. The all-Aluminum kit includes a fry pan with handle (lost the handle, alas), a deep plate, 1-pint kettle and cup. All are UL even by today's standards. You can find them on Ebay.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: RE: Old school metal cups on 07/28/2012 11:41:47 MDT Print View

Post a photo! I see Boy Scout kits now and then but I haven't known a way to determine age. Maybe I'll find you a handle :)

Elliott Wolin
(ewolin) - MLife

Locale: Hampton Roads, Virginia
RE: Old school metal cups on 07/28/2012 13:52:41 MDT Print View

The pan says it's made in Japan so this kit may be a knockoff. But I'm pretty sure I've had it since the 1960's. The cup weighs 30g, pot w/lid 119g, pot alone 91g, dish 75g, pan 99g.

Aluminum Boy Scout mess kit from the 1960's

Edited by ewolin on 07/28/2012 13:57:28 MDT.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: RE: Old school metal cups on 07/28/2012 21:50:17 MDT Print View

The ones I have seen have the BSA emblem and more rounded bottom edges on the pots. I'll keep an eye out.