Forum Index » General Lightweight Backpacking Discussion » World Record: Lightest Material in the World Produced


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ROBERT TANGEN
(RobertM2S) - M

Locale: Lake Tahoe
World Record: Lightest Material in the World Produced on 07/17/2012 13:28:37 MDT Print View

ScienceDaily (July 17, 2012) — A network of porous carbon tubes that is three-dimensionally interwoven at nano and micro level -- this is the lightest material in the world. It weights only 0.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter, and is therefore 75 times lighter than Styrofoam, but it is very strong nevertheless. Scientists have named their creation "Aerographite." It is jet-black, remains stable, is electrically conductive, ductile and non-transparent. Despite its low weight, Aerographite is highly resilient. While lightweight materials normally withstand compression but not tension, Aerographite features both: an excellent compression and tension load. It is able to be compressed up to 95 percent and be pulled back to its original form without any damage.

Jay Wilkerson
(Creachen) - MLife

Locale: East Bay
World Record: Lightest material in the world on 07/17/2012 14:08:35 MDT Print View

Thats great information Robert. Do you know the next step in production and where they go from there?

Steve Meier
(smeier) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Coming soon... on 07/17/2012 15:58:14 MDT Print View

We should have a backpack made of it by Spring for just $3,995.

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: World Record: Lightest Material in the World Produced on 07/17/2012 16:15:40 MDT Print View

This pales in comparison with unobtainium;-)

K C
(KalebC) - F

Locale: South West
RE: on 07/17/2012 23:57:07 MDT Print View

I'll take 10 yards please

Dean F.
(acrosome) - MLife

Locale: Back in the Front Range
Ductile? on 07/18/2012 08:18:50 MDT Print View

It's DUCTILE? Why do I find that hard to believe?

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: World Record: Lightest Material in the World Produced on 07/18/2012 08:31:52 MDT Print View

"Strong" and "compressed up to 95 percent" seem inconsistent

Is it supposed to be structural - like a backpack frame or pole, or insulation?

Dean F.
(acrosome) - MLife

Locale: Back in the Front Range
3D materials on 07/19/2012 12:58:23 MDT Print View

I'm thinking it's more like aerogel, or that funky 3D-mesh NiTi stuff.