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Ultralight knives and multi tools?
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Douglas Hus
(Hustler) - F

Locale: Ontario, Canada
Ultralight knives and multi tools on 02/28/2007 06:34:37 MST Print View

Any one know the weight of Gerber;

-Suspension Multi-Plier
http://www.gerbergear.com/product.php?model=1471

-Crux
http://www.gerbergear.com/product.php?model=1568

-Clutch
http://www.gerbergear.com/product.php?model=1507


Doug


.

Richard Matthews
(food) - F

Locale: Colorado Rockies
Re: Ultralight knives and multi tools? on 02/28/2007 07:01:32 MST Print View

I carry a MiniBuck 350. They were discontinued, but some are still in inventory at places. 1.3 oz.

I also carry a pair of folding sewing scissors. 1.0 oz.

John S.
(jshann) - F
Buck minitool on 02/28/2007 07:48:50 MST Print View

I had one of the buck minitools but returned it. When you clamp down using the pliers, because of the way it closes, the handles can give and slide sideways. You'd have to see how it closes to understand. Anyway, a classic swiss army is all I have needed so far.

Wayne mentions a fatality and what could be done. It seems a pointed knife in a water emergency could be dangerous just as with kayaking. I think EMT shears are under-rated. A small version of a gerber river shorty would be interesting or cutting the tip off and rounding out a decent length blade with a partial serrated edge.

Edited by jshann on 02/28/2007 10:23:52 MST.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: the venerable SAK on 02/28/2007 08:19:36 MST Print View

Einstein X wrote: "I've had a Victorinox on me for 14 years. I feel naked without it."

For all the tool and knife research I have done over the last six months or so, the Swiss Army knives still remain the best balance of weight, utility, and even cost. I like the Trekker model as it has a locking blade and saw. I wish it had scissors. I carry a Classic to cover that base. The Farmer model has a similar tool set and is small and lighter. There is certainly no lack of options, although it is all too easy to get a knife so loaded with gizmos that it is difficult to use, let alone heavy.

I had to smile thinking of a altimeter in the Netherlands (I know you travel) I once had a friend who seriously asked if I had been to the Dutch Alps--- I haven't been to Vaalserberg either :) I still use that question as an analogy of geographic ignorance.

There is a whole cult of "everyday carry" where people compare and contrast the gizmos and gadgets they carry everyday. It's a very interesting Web subculture. I have found useful ultralight items here and there-- spy capsules come to mind.

See http://www.edcdepot.com and http://www.edcforums.com/

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Ultralight knives and multi tools on 02/28/2007 08:49:43 MST Print View

Doug asked:

"Any one know the weight of Gerber;

-Suspension Multi-Plier
http://www.gerbergear.com/product.php?model=1471

-Crux
http://www.gerbergear.com/product.php?model=1568

-Clutch
http://www.gerbergear.com/product.php?model=1507"

Suspension: 6.7oz

Crux: you stumped me on this one. Appears to be a new model. Interesting tool set-- I want one!

Clutch: 2.4oz

It is maddening that even a manufacturer won't list weights on their web site. I do get good results finding product weights by simply searching on "gerber suspension weight", etc-- as much as you can believe the listed weights.

Einstein X
(EinsteinX) - F

Locale: The Netherlands
Re: Re: the venerable SAK on 02/28/2007 08:54:17 MST Print View

>>I had to smile thinking of a altimeter in the Netherlands<<

LOL. Hey when you live at two (maybe three I'm not sure) meters below sea level it's good to know how far I have to swim up in case the d.i.k.e.s.* break. :D

Eins

*hmmm that didn't make the profanity filter. A d.i.k.e is a man made structure to hold back river or sea water so the land protected by that d.i.k.e can be used for farming, living or building trafic jams.

Edited by EinsteinX on 02/28/2007 08:55:04 MST.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Buck minitool on 02/28/2007 08:57:37 MST Print View

John Shannon wrote:

"....Wayne mentions a fatality and what could be done. It seems a sharp knife in a water emergency could be dangerous just as with kayaking. I think EMT shears are under-rated. A small version of a gerber river shorty would be interesting or cutting the tip off and rounding out a decent length blade with a partial serrated edge."

There are whole classes of rescue knives with serrated edges and blunt tips. Vitorinox just came out with one that has glow-in-the-dark handles to boot.

If I saw somene trapped in their pack underwater, I think I could manage the risk of cutting them! I read Wayne's reply was a good illustration of just one need for a little more knife for emergency/survival use in the backcountry. Even a mid-sized Swiss Army knife or 2"-3" folding pocket knife would have done the trick in this scenario.

It should be mentioned that you should always unbuckle your waist belt and drop your pack to one shoulder if possible when crossing streams. If crossing with a party, locked-arm techniques work really well too.

John Coyle
(Bigsac)

Locale: NorCal
Ultralight knives and Multitools on 02/28/2007 11:44:37 MST Print View

Three that I have and like:

1. Gerber Ultralight LST lockblade,(knife only) .6oz, about $19 American, made in Portland Oregon.

2. Gerber LST II lockblade, (knife only) 1.5oz, bought one yesterday at Sports Authority on sale for $15 American, made in Portland Oregon. A little bigger than above and lug on blade for one hand opening.

3. Leatherman Squirt P-4 multitool, 2oz.

You can google any of these to get more info. I tend to prefer a dedicated lockback knife for cutting because the knives on a multitool usually don't lock and can fold up under pressure. I almost cut the tip of my finger off once with a multitool knife that folded under pressure. I taped it back on and luckily it grew back. My own d... fault. (Your program deleted the real word!)

Matthew Smedley
(BenchmadePR) - F
Benchmade Knife Company on 03/01/2007 09:42:14 MST Print View

Hello all,

I am the Public Relations person for Benchmade Knife Company. As a backpacker myself I stumbled upon this forum and wanted to throw in my two cents.

When I first started working at Benchmade my mind immediately started thinking of which knives would be the best for backpacking. I have actually gone down to multiple REI's and trained their staff at the knife counter on different types of steels, handle materials, strength thresholds and more.

From the Benchmade line there are a few suggestions that I have that fit the bill for both lightweight and high quality:

The 530 Pardue - http://www.benchmade.com/products/product_detail.aspx?model=530

This lil fella is 1.88oz, has high quality and durable 154CM steel (for those of you not familiar with steel this is consider high quality because of the edge that it will maintain, ease of sharpening, semi-stainless steel and strength)

The 10610 Benchmite - http://www.benchmade.com/products/product_detail.aspx?model=10610

The main advantage of this folding knife is that it is even lighter and smaller at 1.60oz. Good quality AUS8 blade steel and a fantastic price point.

The 556 Griptilian - http://www.benchmade.com/products/product_detail.aspx?model=556

This knife was recently featured in the 2007 Backpacker Magazine's Gear Guide. It received some of the highest accolades from the editors and there is a good reason. Combine patented technologies, form, function, durability, reliability and price... then you have this knife. It is not as light as the rest but trust me, adding the extra .80oz will be WELL worth it.

I hope this information helps. Feel free to throw any questions back my way. I would love to answer any questions anyone might have regarding steel, components, handle materials, weight, etc...

Brett .
(Brett1234) - F

Locale: CA
Matthew, re; benchmade for climbers on 03/01/2007 10:05:06 MST Print View

Matthew,
Thanks for the info. I am aware of the reputation of benchmade knives. They fetch a very high price here in Japan.

Climbers and mountaineers require a knife which locks in the closed position, so the knife has no chance of opening partially or fully, and contacting any of the rope or webbing. Some manufacturers like spyderco do this by closing the blade behind the "O" which the carabiner hooks into. This does not work well with new non-oval cross-section biners. The best solution is to have a thumb-released lock, like on the little gerbers at REI (which I bought)

If benchmade does not already make such a knife, please suggest it; and call it the "climber's.." something or other.., so we may readily identify it and buy it.
Yeah, and make it weigh about what one biner weighs, 1 1/2 oz.
Thanks.

Brett .
(Brett1234) - F

Locale: CA
Einstein, the pen? on 03/01/2007 10:08:50 MST Print View

The altimeter knife has a pen? Or did I misunderstand. That would be nice.
I carry an old victorinox also, as my 'kitchen' tool; as well as my leatherman S4 on my keychain.

david fausnight
(rckjnky) - F
Re: Matthew, re; benchmade for climbers on 03/01/2007 10:14:51 MST Print View

Brett, The benchmite II that Matthew pointed out does lock both open and cloesed. It weights 1.6 oz and sells for $35. It might be just right for you.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Benchmade Knife Company on 03/01/2007 11:39:17 MST Print View

Matthew Smedley (BenchmadePR) said:

"I am the Public Relations person for Benchmade Knife Company. As a backpacker myself I stumbled upon this forum and wanted to throw in my two cents."

Thanks for that great selection. There are so many designs and steel types and variations that it can be overwhelming to sort it all out.

Benchmade really does a great job. The Griptilian(s) are on my wish list for sure. I think both the folding and fixed blade "Grips" are one of those classic designs where all the sweet spots came together. Heheh-- I will be HAPPY to field test Benchmade knives any time!

Einstein X
(EinsteinX) - F

Locale: The Netherlands
Re: Einstein, the pen? on 03/02/2007 05:06:10 MST Print View

Brett,

>>The altimeter knife has a pen?<<

Yep! And it has the toothpick and tweezers of course and, if you know where to find it, a pin as well.

I'll make some pictures now, though my webcam is a bit low res.

Here's the Altimeters side:

side of Alti

On the left you see a white-ish thingy: the tooth pick; and the greyish thingy that's the pen

On the right one greyish thingy which are the tweezers.

In the next picture you can see (sort of) the pen and pin sticking out. I put a square around the pine otherwise you might miss it:

Alti pen and needle 1

This last picture shows the pin and pen next to the knife:

Alti pen and needle 2

Eins

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Einstein, the pen? on 03/02/2007 07:36:03 MST Print View

http://www.victorinox.ch/index.cfm?site=victorinox.ch&page=196&lang=E

Jaiden .
(jaiden) - F
light multitool on 03/02/2007 07:50:19 MST Print View

I dug out my multitool mentioned above and found it online:

http://www.eknifeworks.com/webapp/eCommerce/product.jsp?Mode=Brand&Brand=25&A=&SKU=PC2875
(out of stock, but google for "coast micro-fish tool" and you'll find other places that have it)

It's 2 oz and even has a tiny saw. Mine came with a retractable cord thing

Matthew Smedley
(BenchmadePR) - F
Re: Matthew, re; benchmade for climbers on 03/02/2007 09:42:10 MST Print View

The only knives in our current lineup that lock open AND closed are our automatic knives. I'm not sure of how the laws work for automatics for where you are but our automatic AXIS® knives are great because they are not a push button. The great part of the AXIS mechanism is that it is ambidextrous so the user can open with either hand. Not only that, but with standard push button automatic knives if the spring fails within the automatic opening device the knife is rendered useless. If the spring fails in the automatic AXIS the knife still works as a manual folding knife and the lock can still function keeping the blade open or closed.

Thanks for the input everyone!

David Lewis
(davidlewis) - MLife

Locale: Nova Scotia, Canada
Re: Re: Ultralight knives and multi tools? on 03/02/2007 09:47:37 MST Print View

Denis. Nice tool. Pretty impressive for 1 oz! One thing tho'... you mention that you carry it in your first aid kit. Where do you carry your first aid kit? In you pack? There are a few things I NEVER put in my pack... knife, lighter/fire starter and led light and whistle. They go in pockets or on a lanyard that I keep tucked into my shirt. If you were to ever take a tumble or somehow lose your pack... you'd want a few essentials to stay on your person.

John Hopkins
(DrGonzo) - F

Locale: Southeast
knives/multitools on 03/02/2007 18:43:54 MST Print View

I think what it really gets down to is:
What do you really need?
Since nothing I carry has any screws or nuts, that rules out the screwdrivers. The only reason I would need pliers is to untie knots (poorly tied or frozen) but I would rather tie good knots (as far as using pliers as tweezers, most are not that good). That just leaves me with scissors and an all-purpose knife blade. I would like to see a good locking knife with a good pair of scissors that fold out of the handle.

Edited by DrGonzo on 03/02/2007 18:47:46 MST.

Brett .
(Brett1234) - F

Locale: CA
Einstein, David.. on 03/03/2007 08:40:05 MST Print View

Einstein, NICE; a knife with a pen.. Currently I rely on the Fisher space pen in my my wallet, but I often thought the refils were small enough to carry elsewhere. Good combo.

David, I agree, some essentials in the pockets. For me it is Doug Ritters survival kit, space blanket, and a knife. Probably never need it, but an ounce of prevention....