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Simon Roth
(NitroPsycho)

Locale: Northwest
Gear List for Regular Use on 07/01/2012 09:08:21 MDT Print View

Hello All-


This is the beginning of my gear list, I need to order some small bottles and Aqua mira and then add that a clothing to my list, but this basically covers the big 3 and a few other things that were close by and I could weigh quickly.


Take a look and let me know what you think. I am trying to determine which to switch out first, the sleeping bag or the shelter, as I have been told to save the backpack to last.

Thanks!

Simon

http://www.geargrams.com/list?id=8581

Skylar Davis
(Skilo) - F
Some thoughts... on 07/03/2012 09:50:47 MDT Print View

Good starting point. I agree with waiting to change out your backpack last, after you've sorted out the rest of your gear. And plus, your pack weighs 34.87 ounces so even when you do switch it out for a light bag, it'll be a weight savings of 18-20 ounces or so, as apposed to multiple pounds for swapping your shelter and sleeping bag to lighter options.

Although your sleeping bag and shelter are heavy, the thing that stands out most to me is your 42.25 ounce sleeping pad. Pads that weigh ~18 ounces are considered "heavy". 42 ounces is the UL equivalent to carrying a king-sized bed! It seems to me that would be the first place to start, as it will be the least painful switch on the wallet. I currently use a Small Therm-a-Rest RidgeRest SOLite pad...Weighs 9 ounces and costs 20 bucks on Amazon. Plenty comfortable and decent warmth (R value = 2.8). I don't know your age or sleeping preferences, though...I'm 25 and could likely sleep on a bed of nails, so your mileage may vary. Even if that's the case, a great option for an inflatable is the Therm-a-Rest Prolite...Obviously more heavy, but perhaps more comfortable.

After that, I'd look to find a new shelter system. 84.50 ounces is a behemoth. Personally, I prefer a poncho tarp and bivy shelter system, although it did take some getting use to on my part and I understand that it's not for everyone. My Golite Poncho Tarp, bivy, ground cloth, and stakes weigh just under 18 ounces. I live in the U.S south-east and during the summer I just hammock camp, another relatively cheap and lightweight shelter system.

After that, I'd look to change out the 20 degree bag for a 20 degree quilt. In my opinion, quilts have made sleeping bags obsolete. Lighter weight and less volume for around the same price of a sleeping bag of equal temperature rating. Enlightened Equipment quilts are the standard for quality in the world of quilts, in my mind.

Simon Roth
(NitroPsycho)

Locale: Northwest
Reply on 07/05/2012 01:49:53 MDT Print View

Skylar, thanks for the killer response. I just purchased a Hexamid solo w/ beak that should arrive in ~ 2 weeks. Plus, I am going to pick up one of the CCF sleping pads that and trim it down to torso length and use that w/ my pack under my legs.


Has anyone ever had a seamstress alter a sleeping bag into a quilt? Maybe that would be an inexpensive alternative for the interim until I have the money to get a new quilt.



The switch to the Hexamid is gonna save me like 4.5 pounds! Really excited for that!


Simon

Daniel Cox
(COHiker) - F

Locale: San Isabel NF
Re: Reply on 07/05/2012 06:15:04 MDT Print View

A lot of people really like the quilt option here, and I can see the attraction, they're pretty versatile.
I do want to point out something often overlooked: quilts don't have a hood. This may not be an issue for you. For me I'd actually prefer my sleeping insulation for temps over 45F to be hood-less, but if we're talking below 40F, I prefer an attached hood, with a hole for my face to poke out. For cold temps simply burrowing down into the quilt leaves a small hole on top of my head, and me breathing hot moist air into the down.
If you do go quilt, I'd certainly recommend an enLIGHTend Equipment. They have a long reputation as crazy well made and give a forum member business.
But you'll still want to budget in another $40-50 for a down hood, both in price and weight. The hoods I looked at when I was wrestling with the bag/quilt dilemma were about $50 and weigh about

To decide if you like a quilt, leave your bag unzipped and laid over you like a blanket, flip the hood inside out so it's folded back toward the feet.
Obviously many people like this setup, many don't. Just know you'll almost certainly need to factor in a separate hood with a quilt.

Simon Roth
(NitroPsycho)

Locale: Northwest
Update on 07/10/2012 03:02:42 MDT Print View

Gear list has been updated extensivley as I have gotten ready for this trip.


If you have a moment please review and let me know what you think.


Thanks!


Simon