Forum Index » General Lightweight Backpacking Discussion » Limited lifespan for silnylon?


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Piper S.
(sbhikes) - F

Locale: Santa Barbara (Name: Diane)
Limited lifespan for silnylon? on 06/04/2012 10:03:40 MDT Print View

Is the lifespan for silnylon limited? I am wondering if perhaps my rain chaps no longer are waterproof (actually I kind of wonder if they ever really were waterproof, but I digress.) I'm curious, however, if silnylon stops being waterproof after a while.

Richard Nisley
(richard295) - M

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Limited lifespan for silnylon? on 06/04/2012 11:02:08 MDT Print View

Piper,

Yes. Other than Shield from Thru-Hiker, every retail DIY silnylon that I have tested is less than the threshold for rain proof at 1,500 mm when new. It only gets worse since wet flex degrades the coating; it becomes less waterproof with each use. The degradation curve is hockey stick shaped. It starts degrading fast and then slows down.

The good news is that it is an easy problem to solve. Just paint one side with “1:3 slurry of Silicone and mineral spirits” to rejuvenate the coating.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
HUH? You mean 5:1? on 06/11/2012 20:24:42 MDT Print View

Richard, I beg to disagree slightly. I've found a 5:1 ratio of "Odorless" Mineral Spirits to GE silicon (by volume) is the best light coating for silnylon. 3:1 ratio is for seam sealing only.

Had the 5:1 coating on the top 1/2 of my TT Moment for the past 3 years and so far no "mist-thru" in the heaviest of rains.

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: HUH? You mean 5:1? on 06/11/2012 21:45:45 MDT Print View

Richard, I beg to disagree slightly. I've found a 5:1 ratio of "Odorless" Mineral Spirits to GE silicon (by volume) is the best light coating for silnylon. 3:1 ratio is for seam sealing only.

WELL ... that depends entirely on how waterproof you want it to be. If one is REALLY concerned about the issue then use GE Silicon II undiluted!

But that said ... like Eric, I've been content with the results from treating with the 5:1 slurry. Except that I used 5:1 by weight instead of volume (not sure how different that is)

drowning in spam
(leaftye) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: Re: HUH? You mean 5:1? on 06/11/2012 21:48:03 MDT Print View

How do you guys get the slurry to mix well? I've tried it a couple times, and it seems like the silicone sinks to the bottom and the mineral spirits turn milky white.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: HUH? You mean 5:1? on 06/11/2012 21:52:57 MDT Print View

> How do you guys get the slurry to mix well?
Its very, very hard to do, especially with the hardware store cartridges.
And while you are mixing vigorously, the trace water in the solvent is making the silicone start curing.

Cheers

Harald Hope
(hhope) - M

Locale: East Bay
whisk on 06/12/2012 22:58:36 MDT Print View

I haven't done this yet, tents are still new enough, but I've read a few people here say to use a drill with a clothes hanger wire bent to form a sort of whisk shape. Makes sense to me, same idea as a blender vs using a mortar/pestle to make pesto... good luck ever getting the pesto smooth with mortar and pestle, easy with a power tool, I know, I tried that for a while (pesto by hand that is, same idea, oily thing mixing in with something you want to blend perfectly into the oil). Power whisk type thing is what I would do in this case, then add in a bit more mineral spirits and whisk again with drill if it starts setting.

This is one reason I decided not to use silnylon fabric on my recent backpack project, I was debating it, but opted for very nicely coated 70d, which, if you add in the extra weight of coating again silnylon, starts looking better and better all the time. Keep in mind there's a huge range of coating thickness and quality for pu coated nylon too.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Mixing (& re-mixing) silicone slurry on 06/18/2012 17:55:46 MDT Print View

I just put it in a one pint jar with a tight lid and shake a lot then use. Every 5 minutes I put the lid back on and shake again. Repeat until you're done or must mix a new batch.

This work especially well for the 3:1 thicker mix for seam sealing.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Mixing on 06/18/2012 19:56:45 MDT Print View

"How do you guys get the slurry to mix well? "

I use a 1 quart yogurt container because it is Deep.

Then I stick a piece of 'J' shaped coat hanger in the variable speed drill. (The upward tip on the 'J' keeps it from hanging up or slashing the side of the container.)

About a minute later on SLOW the deed is done.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Limited lifespan for silnylon? on 06/18/2012 20:35:37 MDT Print View

It can be VERY simple...
Get a small can , I used tuna cans but a cut down soda can will do, a small paint brush, paint thinner and the silicone.
Put a blob of silicone in the can. add a little bit of paint thinner , mix in with your paint brush. Add a bit more thinner, mix in and keep doing it till you get the consistency you like.
Thick olive oil is what I aim for.
Takes me well under a minute to do...
You can see that at the start of this video :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYjOkxR4sgc&list=UU0PuLUKvG7Fxxex5BMVK4vw&index=6&feature=plcp
BTW, I do dozens of tents a year so if I thought there was a faster or easier way I would do it...
Franco
( I just seam sealed a Notch. Used about 2/3 of an ounce of silicone. I have now a small plastic bowl from which the silicone can be peeled off from when dry so I keep re-using that)