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The "naughty" heavy luxury items that you just don't wanna leave behind!
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Michael K
(chinookhead) - F - M
The "naughty" heavy luxury items that you just don't wanna leave behind! on 04/30/2012 19:12:12 MDT Print View

What are those "luxury" and not needed heavy items that you just don't want to leave behind? Post away!

The one item that I know I should leave behind, that I just don't want to leave behind on backpacking trips is my "Zojirushi" coffee thermos. It is 10oz. It is just so convenient and relaxing to be able to have hot coffee or tea at any point in the day in an instant with no preparation involved. Just sit down and enjoy the moment when you happen upon that perfect spot for taking in the scenery or enjoying your surroundings.

My other rediculously heavy stuff on some trips is my fishing gear on my hiking trips where fishing is a big part of the trip. I basically ignore weight when it comes to the fishing gear in favor of the "fun" factor.

Just some background about myself...I've hiked from a young age, but my hiking style has been anything, but ultralight. I hiked just with the cheapest gear that I could scrounge together from regular items around the house like K-mart silly heavy and large sleeping bags etc. and I have gradually crossed over to "dedicated" camping gear...although not necessarily the lightest stuff.

After cruising these forums for about a month now, I've already trimmed 15 pounds off my "normal" pack load :)

Edited by chinookhead on 04/30/2012 19:52:43 MDT.

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: The "naughty" heavy luxury items that you just don't wanna leave behind! on 04/30/2012 19:59:18 MDT Print View

I'm an illustrator and writer and though it is heavy, I prefer to bring a high quality sketchbook with me, and an adequate case with proper drawing and writing tools. The sketchbook in particular is rather heavy, but every time I don't bring it I regret it.

I also like to watch birds and wildlife, so often I bring a light pair of binoculars. More weight.

Jay Wilkerson
(Creachen) - MLife

Locale: East Bay
The "naughty" heavy luxury items that you just don't wanna leave behind! on 04/30/2012 20:10:21 MDT Print View

I really enjoy music of all different genres and especially jazz around a campfire.. My luxury item would be mini-speakers for my IPOD at 1.3oz (Dream Gear Audio Bug) Not loud just background music--get your groove on!

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: The "naughty" heavy luxury items that you just don't wanna leave behind! on 04/30/2012 20:39:43 MDT Print View

BA air core pad.. it's pretty heavy but about the same as the therma rest i came from with way more comfort. i am a side sleeper so the little 1/4 nothing pads folks on here use will not work for me ever.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: The "naughty" heavy luxury items that you just don't wanna leave behind! on 04/30/2012 20:51:38 MDT Print View

Lately it has been a NeoAir and candy bars. Doesn't sound that luxurious but for me they are.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: The "naughty" heavy luxury items that you just don't wanna leave behind! on 04/30/2012 21:01:11 MDT Print View

"The one item that I know I should leave behind, that I just don't want to leave behind on backpacking trips is my "Zojirushi" coffee thermos. It is 10oz. It is just so convenient and relaxing to be able to have hot coffee or tea at any point in the day in an instant with no preparation involved. Just sit down and enjoy the moment when you happen upon that perfect spot for taking in the scenery or enjoying your surroundings."

You make me want to bring a thermos.

Me, No more tarps for me. I like a tent. Guilty as charged.

Cliff McKay
(cmckay@rochester.rr.com)

Locale: Upstate New York
My heavy luxury makes me feel good after the trip editing the photos on 04/30/2012 21:04:27 MDT Print View

I trim out other stuff so I can carry a ridiculously heavy DSLR, 12-24mm, 40mm macro lens and tripod. When I get home I have great photos of my friends and family that I can play with in my old age.

On top in a blow shot with the heavy camera

I think its worth it.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Re: Re: The "naughty" heavy luxury items that you just don't wanna leave behind! on 04/30/2012 21:04:56 MDT Print View

Same here Miguel.
A good sketchbook/journal (I've always liked the 5x7 Moleskine) and a good set of pens and pencils usually comes with me.
I'm likely going to start carrying brushes and a basic watercolor and/or ink kit as well.

Another "luxury" that has become a staple is my Exped Synmat UL7. Unless drunk or coming off a 40 mile day, I have never slept as well in the mountains.

I did a quick overnight with my daughter last Saturday. I stayed up well past midnight writing beside the fire after getting her to sleep. That trip convinced me I'm going to start strapping a low, folding beach chair to my pack for mellow trips of this nature. When you're only walking a few miles and spending the majority of time in camp, why not?

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
I have 2 that stick out. on 04/30/2012 21:14:27 MDT Print View

Coffee. It really is a bit of a luxury, considering my lack of dependency on it. Items required include coffee specific mug and grounds.

Camera. I dont make any sort of living packing a camera with me, but photographing what I see is a natural practice.

Hersheys Special Dark. Its my night cap. Comes on every trip, all that fancy pants 80% cacao pilfered from Costa Ricans is rubbish, the best is made right here in the USA. ;-p

Nathan Hays
(oroambulant)

Locale: San Francisco
Rocks on 04/30/2012 21:41:53 MDT Print View

Somehow there are always more interesting rocks in my pack hiking out than I started with. One year I saw my wife and daughter stuffing a HUGE green rock into my pack - at least 8 lbs. I pretended I didn't notice and slung the pack on anyway. I complained the whole 12 miles down about the long day, how my shoulders were getting sore, and how I wasn't going to bring the buck knife and the 100 feet of rope next time. They giggled the whole way. Now we have a very nice glittering green stone next to our fireplace and a tale to tell.

Adan Lopez
(Lopez) - F

Locale: San Gabriel Valley
Luxury items on 04/30/2012 22:28:03 MDT Print View

I just finished reading Muir. Just about everything in my pack is a luxury now.

Alex H
(abhitt) - MLife

Locale: southern appalachians or desert SW
compack chair kit on 05/01/2012 05:03:51 MDT Print View

Only 6 oz. but, somewhat like Craig, it is nice to sit up right with the legs stretched out in the sleeping bag on those long dark nights Oct.-March when I am usually out. Getting too old to sit cross legged without back support for more than a little while.

Erik Basil
(EBasil) - M

Locale: Atzlan
ahhhh, the root of the problem on 05/01/2012 08:21:04 MDT Print View

Ahh, this gets to the core of why I'm "lighter" but not "ultralight":

--BA air core pad
--REI tripod stool
--fishing rig
--camera, sometimes the DSLR
--tent
--camp shoes
--smart phone
--big, comfy, reliable Kelty Tioga

Elliott Wolin
(ewolin) - MLife

Locale: Hampton Roads, Virginia
Re: The "naughty" heavy luxury items that you just don't wanna leave behind!" on 05/01/2012 10:53:40 MDT Print View

For me and my wife it's:

Extra clean clothes, for sleeping in and to wear while other clothes are drying after a wash.

Camp footwear so I can take off my soggy hiking shoes and socks, dry my feet and walk around.

Heavier camera than usual for especially scenic trips.

Binoculars when we expect lots of wildlife, e.g. in Alaska.

Umbrella (but that's an essential).

Michael Levine
(Trout) - F

Locale: Long Beach
Re: Re: The "naughty" heavy luxury items that you just don't wanna leave behind!" on 05/01/2012 11:05:08 MDT Print View

"I just finished reading Muir. Just about everything in my pack is a luxury now."

HAH. Yeah right? Stale bread and a coat, anything else is luxury.

Gregory Petliski
(gregpphoto) - F
re on 05/01/2012 15:58:23 MDT Print View

I bring not one but TWO pillows son, one for my head and one for between my knees (side sleeper). People forget that you spend at least 1/4 to 1/3 of your backpacking time SLEEPING :) Might as well be comfortable for it. YMMV but I notice my hikes are negatively affected if I dont get a good nights rest beforehand.

Kimberly Wersal
(kwersal) - MLife

Locale: Western Colorado
Re: re on 05/01/2012 21:11:16 MDT Print View

Alite chair (18 oz.)
Paperback book
Chocolate

I like to lounge in camp.

Daniel Cox
(COHiker) - F

Locale: San Isabel NF
Canister stove on 05/01/2012 21:28:14 MDT Print View

Its 5oz heavier than my etOH stove, but it's so dang convenient to unfold the burner, screw it on the can, click the piezo and we're cooking. no measuring fuel, filling the stove, care not to spill,

I spent a lot of time and a handful of money on MYOG cooking equipment, but more and more I go out I think it's worth the weight.

Sabine Funk
(SabineFunk) - F
Re: can´t leave them behind on 05/02/2012 05:42:15 MDT Print View

It´s probably backpacking abroad.

Makes me carry passport, adapters for plugs and all those bits and pieces that become quite heavy after a while... And completely useless on the trails =(

So there´s "only" the luxury of being in a foreign country, no extra luxury on trail...

jacko vanderbijl
(jacko1956)

Locale: Shelley Western Australia
Real milk on 05/02/2012 05:55:37 MDT Print View

I leave a resupply with real milk and use it for coffee and cereal. When it runs out I use condensed milk in a tube for coffee and go without for cereal. I can't stand powdered milk.
Placing a litre bottle (plastic - I'm not completely mad) loosely in a plastic bag I wrap it with some toilet paper that I keep moist to act as a cooler via evaporation. I get it to last about 3 days in cool weather before turning.