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Mary R
(pietimer) - MLife
Sierra High Route + Bushbuddy on 04/19/2012 17:22:56 MDT Print View

Hey all,
I'm planning on hiking a section of the SHR in early September (Devil's post-pile to Yosemite). From various pictures I've found on the internet, there are mostly rocks, lakes, and more rocks--very few trees. I'm concerned about the availability of fuel for a bushbuddy stove. I know I can bring some esbit tablets for backup, but I wouldn't want to be cooking with them every night. To those who have been in this area, is this a valid concern?
Thanks.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Los Angeles, CA, USA
Re: Sierra High Route + Bushbuddy on 04/20/2012 14:35:32 MDT Print View

Mary,

I haven't done the SHR, but anything above 10,000 wood starts to get scarce. A lot of places have wood fire restrictions starting at 9600; 10,000; or 10;400, depending on the area. Some popular areas have fire bans at much lower elevations. It's worth checking what the restrictions are and comparing those to your planned camp locations.

There's also an ethical consideration at higher elevations. Wood takes years and years to grow. Even if there aren't any restrictions, I generally won't plan on having a wood fire above 10,000'.

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: Re: Sierra High Route + Bushbuddy on 04/20/2012 14:58:07 MDT Print View

some older bushbuddy restriction posts

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=7058&skip_to_post=55997#55997

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=10793

Steve S
(idahosteve) - F

Locale: Idaho
Re: Sierra High Route + Bushbuddy on 04/20/2012 20:58:00 MDT Print View

you won't be having much luck using that stove... like the others are saying, as you hit 10,000 feet, fires are prohibited. With the vast majority of the route at or above this elevation, you will be out of luck. From my trip last year, there is really no fuel at those elevations. Probably the best bang for the buck is the smaller cannister stoves. Easy to use, long lasting, and easy to get at re-supply, I used one cannister for 8 days last year on the SHR. there are other choices, so do your research and enjoy the opportunity to try another method and some different gear....

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Sierra High Route + Bushbuddy on 04/20/2012 22:07:22 MDT Print View

"Easy to use, long lasting, and easy to get at re-supply, I used one cannister for 8 days last year on the SHR."

What size? 4 ounce net or 8 ounce net?

--B.G.--

Steve S
(idahosteve) - F

Locale: Idaho
Re: Re: Re: Sierra High Route + Bushbuddy on 04/29/2012 19:25:06 MDT Print View

the 4 oz net. I used a Wally world IMUSA mug, and made a cozy for it. Worked really well! Kept food and liquid really hot while the meal re-hydrated. Used the stove every morning except one, and every evening.