Cylinder Stove Specs
Display Avatars Sort By:
Adam Thibault
(apthibault) - F - M
Cylinder Stove Specs on 03/27/2012 08:01:00 MDT Print View

I'm making a version of the Ti Goat cylinder stove and am about do drill the intake holes and the feeder hole in the end plate, my question...

Does anyone have one of the Ti Goat stoves that they could measure the diameter of the intake holes/feeder hole and let me know? I don't want to rip off Ti Goat's work, however I would like to get the dimensions correct to make sure my stove has the proper air intake...

Many thanks!

george carr
(hammer-one) - F

Locale: Walking With The Son
Re:Cylinder Stove Specs on 04/03/2012 18:17:38 MDT Print View

Adam, I just made the same stove last week. I placed (5) 3/8" holes right below the feed door. As far as the door goes, I made that as large as the endplate would possibly allow so I wouldn't have to fight to feed the stove. With a 3" diameter, 9' pipe the stove drafted hard enough to shut the door on it's own!

wood burnng cylinderstove

Edited by hammer-one on 04/03/2012 21:03:53 MDT.

Josh Leavitt
(Joshleavitt) - F

Locale: Ruta Locura
intake on 04/03/2012 23:03:20 MDT Print View

If you build it out of stainless it needs those holes, if you build it out of titanium, it does not need those holes. The pictures on the tigoat sight are old, they no longer have/need the holes. Good design in titanium negates their need.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: intake on 04/04/2012 04:07:18 MDT Print View

Hi Josh

That must be one of the most obscure comments I have read for a while! It sounds as though you are saying that a Ti stove does not need air inlet holes, but a SS one does. I am sure that is wrong, so could you please explain?

Cheerts

Adam Thibault
(apthibault) - F - M
Re: Cylinder Stove Specs on 04/04/2012 07:38:53 MDT Print View

@George - nice work! How do you plan on doing the legs? I was thinking about riviting t-nuts to the end plates (much like the Ed T stoves) however I was also thinking it would be easy to just run a bolt throgh the end plate edge and stove body and lock it down on the other side with a wing nut...

@Josh - my end plates are titanium (snow peak plates) but my body will be SS (at least for now). Do you think I will need intake holes?

george carr
(hammer-one) - F

Locale: Walking With The Son
Re:re:Cylinder Stove Specs on 04/07/2012 18:41:47 MDT Print View

There is no difference between how a ti or ss stove will draft, all things being equal. The end plates on my stove are ti, as is the damper assembly. I'm not sure why the lower holes are gone on the newer tigoat stove, except to say it looks like the door might not be a 100% seal, letting some air draft through. When I close the door with the damper wide open the air being drawn in through the front acts like a magnet drawing the flame to the front of the firebox. The stove actually roars when the damper is open full.

@Adam, if you notice there are a couple of "extra" holes in the front. I actually bent some aluminum rod to insert in those holes to function as legs.

I'm already on version 2.0. I'm waiting on ss plates for the end, and will probably weld washers to the plates so I can insert threaded rod to hold everything together instead of cable and turnbuckles. I think this will go together a little faster. I also think I will weld legs similar to the ti goat legs to my endplates, but I have to get that far first.I'll be sure to update with pics when I get all my materials.

Josh Leavitt
(Joshleavitt) - F

Locale: Ruta Locura
stoves on 04/07/2012 23:35:25 MDT Print View

Adam, With a stainless body, you will want air intake holes.

Rodger, this a simple and accurate statement, it is not obscure. Stainless stoves will need additional air intake holes, titanium stoves will not.

George, All things being equal, a titanium stove and a stainless stove, will not draft the same. They burn different, they draft different, they cook different, they heat different, they are just flat different. Of course the only thing I have to back this up, is designing the first roll up cylinder stove, and having hundreds of hours of burn time on them, so I could be wrong.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: stoves on 04/08/2012 00:41:11 MDT Print View

Hi Josh

> Stainless stoves will need additional air intake holes, titanium stoves will not.
Well, I don't understand. I have a PhD in Physics, and I like to understand these things. Now, don't get me wrong: I place experimental data above theory every day. So if you see differences, I believe you.

My problem is that SS and Ti are both hard metals with poor thermal conductivity. I cannot understand how two stoves made of the different materials but otherwise identical in design can have different airflows and (therefore) different burning behaviour. Of course, it is possible that there are differences in the design between the two versions due to the difficulties in machining Ti.

So, basically, educate me! A few others might also be interested as well. Tell us all.

Cheers

Josh Leavitt
(Joshleavitt) - F

Locale: Ruta Locura
Thermal efficiency on 04/08/2012 11:55:18 MDT Print View

Rodger

I cant say too much, I've already put allot of money in other peoples pockets as is. The simple explanation is the thermal efficiency of Ti increases, exponentially, as it heats up. The thermal efficiency of SS decreases as it heats up. So one pours heat outward, while one tends to shield the heat inward. This affects the way they burn, which affects the input and output flows. One particular aspect is the tempature of the gas exiting, and at different elevations of the pipe. In a stainless steel stove(specifically one with a stainless pipe) the temps in the pipe can be several hundred degrees higher than those in a Ti pipe, from a Ti stove. Because of these temp differences, it matters where and how combustion air is introduced into the stove. So Ti has some physics working in its favor, but design plays an important role also. Rockets hanging out the end of a tent may look "cool", but they dont heat or cook well. They are just the children of poor design, and improperly utilized materials. Dot get me wrong, SS can work as a stove material, but there things to overcome. There is a SS cylinder stove, that will be comercially available, that at least from my first looks, appears to address some of these things. And where weight is not of the utmost concern, SS is an affordable option.

george carr
(hammer-one) - F

Locale: Walking With The Son
Re:Thermal Efficiency on 04/08/2012 12:28:13 MDT Print View

Josh, as Roger says, please educate me. How (or where) do you introduce fresh intake air in a ti stove, as opposed to the front intake of a ss version. Since I am not interested in building an all ti version (or a commercial version for that matter)I won't take offense if this data is considered "sensitive". Just curious since, like Adam, this is more of a DIY project for me than anything. I'm actually considering buying a "pro built" box stove. In that regard would I be better off with say an all ti version like Seek, or a SS version like Kifaru?

Also, I went with a longer pipe because I was concerned about exhaust smoke entering the vents on my tent (Golite Shangra La 5). How do I determine the optimal length of my flue pipe?

Like most others here, I'm always looking to learn something. Or as I used to say, "If you ain't learning, you're not paying attention". :)

Adam Thibault
(apthibault) - F - M
Re: Thermal efficiency on 04/08/2012 15:25:27 MDT Print View

Enough said for me Josh, I'll take your word for it!

Thanks so much for the insight!

kevin timm
(ktimm) - M

Locale: Colorado (SeekOutside)
Stove pipe on 04/09/2012 13:15:21 MDT Print View

I agree a flaming pipe looks cool and makes people think the stove is working but in reality the opposite is true.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Thermal efficiency on 04/09/2012 16:25:12 MDT Print View

Hi Josh

You have done the experiments, I haven't. So in essence what you are saying is that my assumption that the SS and Ti metals will behave similarly was wrong. OK, fascinating stuff.

I understand about design issues in general of course. Been there many times. We look forward to future developments.

Cheers

george carr
(hammer-one) - F

Locale: Walking With The Son
Re: Thermal efficiency on 04/09/2012 16:34:33 MDT Print View

As always(well maybe not always, j/k), Roger says it best. I am pretty happy with what I assembled and did not intend to hijack the thread. I got a clean burn with no flame or smoke that burned completely down to a nice little pile of ash.

Anything you choose to share is appreciated, Josh, anything you choose to hold onto is respectfully understood.

Adam, good luck and keep us posted on your progress.

Kevin, maybe you could help answer my question - how do I determined optimal pipe length? What I'm doing (9' flue pipe) works, but I don't understand heat distribution in the pipe and will concede might not be the best setup. As I stated earlier, I was concerned about stove exaust in my tent. The peak of my shelter is 6' w/ vents near the top.

Edited by hammer-one on 04/09/2012 16:42:39 MDT.

kevin timm
(ktimm) - M

Locale: Colorado (SeekOutside)
Pipe length on 04/09/2012 20:11:24 MDT Print View

If you have a spark arrester , you really just need enough length to exit the tent plus a margin of safety, some of it depends on how high your stove is and how clean your burn is, however I would never recommend a 9 ft pipe in our tent that is about 6 ft tall. I would generally recommend about 7 ft.

george carr
(hammer-one) - F

Locale: Walking With The Son
Re:Pipe length on 04/09/2012 20:48:02 MDT Print View

Kevin, thanks for the reply. I am using a damper and spark arrestor. I'll take your advice and cut the length to 7' . I appreciate your help.

Josh Leavitt
(Joshleavitt) - F

Locale: Ruta Locura
Stoves on 04/10/2012 00:12:00 MDT Print View

George

It is as much about quantity, as it is about location. At least with the front of a cylinder stove. The additional internal heat of a SS stove causes excessive "over draft". To deal with this, larger pipes are helpful, as is the additional intake holes on the front of the stove. Adding additional air at the wrong place, in either Ti or SS, will create undesirable burn conditions. This is sometimes done through bad design, both accidentally, and intentionally.

Longer pipes are good. If built right, 9' pipes in 6' tents work just fine. Spark arresters plug up, and I dont reccomend them, they can actually be dangerous. Prudent use of a good damper, with a long pipe, is your best bet.

To answer your question about which stove, I would say neither. While I am of course biased, scientificly speaking, the K-stoves suck. The other stove is just a K-stove knock off, at least by design. Though it is at least Ti. I am probably not giving enough credit to the damper design though, great improvement, based off one purchased from TiGoat. But its not balanced, or properly adjustable.

kevin timm
(ktimm) - M

Locale: Colorado (SeekOutside)
That is not true on 04/10/2012 07:17:00 MDT Print View

Not a knock of, the only real similarity is using threaded rods. Size, seams , door and damper are much different. The damper was not based as you said , in fact it is much different, in shape, size and construction, it looks like a real damper on a regular stove.

george carr
(hammer-one) - F

Locale: Walking With The Son
Sittin' on a fence singin' kumbya....... on 04/10/2012 15:11:28 MDT Print View

Josh and Kevin, I appreciate both of your input. I am aware of both of your backgrounds on the subject of stove design (or at least who you are and where you came from). I also know that sometime between now and September I will be buying a box stove b/c I believe it will be better for cooking and hot tenting next winter than the cylinder stoves I have been tinkering with. If either or both would like to address some basics for a guy like me to look for in stove design either here or in a pm I welcome it. I have heard in other places that spark arrestors are a bad idea, and I will follow that advice. I think I'll keep tinkering with pipe length, since there seems to be no concensus and so far I guess I've been lucky with my chosen length. I will say that I'm a little confused by "if they are built right". My pipe is .005 ss shim, 12x108, with a ti goat end ring and ti goat ti damper in the 3.125 size. I assuming you mean not so much about rolling the pipe as much as damper, etc.

I'm of the same school as Roger - I like to know why what I'm doing should or shouldn't be working, even if it is :). What I don't want to do is throw gasoline on a fire and cause two respected members here to feel like they have to defend their positions and or reputations.

I see that since I am no longer a member (sorry, not getting into that discussion)there doesn't seem to be a pm address in my profile. I am at georgecarr@trailreadyoutdoors.com .

Edited by hammer-one on 04/10/2012 15:21:40 MDT.

Josh Leavitt
(Joshleavitt) - F

Locale: Ruta Locura
Stoves on 04/12/2012 22:47:35 MDT Print View

George

Buy as you like, I have nothing to gain or loose either way. The consequences and rewards are all yours.

Kevin
So you bought that TiGoat damper, while you were developing your stove, just for fun? Kinda like Ed's titanium purchases from TiGoat? At least you did not get a discount.

Carbon fiber tent stakes(verbatum) ring a bell?

Versa port, err a versa somthing, ring a bell?

I can go on and on.

The threaded leg thing is sort of the defining feature of a K-stove.

What makes you stand out? You could not even make the only defining and some what origonal thought you had, the bottomless/expandable stove, work. For an engineering and design fee of $1, I will make that concept work for you. Your customers come out on top, and I get to demonstrate that you dont know what you are talking about. The $1 can be paypaled to sales@rutalocura.com

When you actually innovate something, I might give you some credit, until then, you are no better than the hoards of Asian factories churning out poorly interpreted american innovation, that they dont truly understand. You should have called your stoves Bulin.

Isn't there some sort of BPL rule, or precedent, about boycotting people like this? Oh yeah, never mind ;-)