Deodorant in a chapstick tube
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George L Privett
(gprivett)

Locale: Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada
"Deodorant in a chapstick tube" on 08/20/2012 23:33:27 MDT Print View

Recipes - organic deodorants
http://www.squidoo.com/homemade-deodorant-recipes

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
+1 on 08/21/2012 00:01:42 MDT Print View

George: Nice link. Thanks. I'll try a small batch, not the .83 cups that recipe gives, but the same ratio using 4 tsp solid coconut oil, 3 tsp baking soda and 3 tsp arrowroot powder.

More so, I love the idea of repurposing an old chapstick tube (CLEARLY MARKED!). That's plenty for a 7-day trip, or my more common business trips, so why bring extra? Cannisters for diabetic blood-sugar test strips have tightly-fitting hinged lids and are 2-3x the volume of a chapstick but smaller than the nearly extinct 35mm film canister.

I'm not overly afraid of "chemicals" (all health-food-store products are - guess what - mixtures of chemicals), so I may just repackage some unscented Mitchum stick deodorant into a chapstick tube.

Jeffs Eleven
(WoodenWizard) - F

Locale: Greater Mt Tabor
Re: "Deodorant in a chapstick tube" on 08/21/2012 09:40:20 MDT Print View

So y'all are the 'freshies' I pass on the trail.

...Deodorant on the trail- ha, that's a good one!


Now.... how to repackage hair gel...

Kurt Suttell
(krshome) - F
re on 09/14/2012 15:29:29 MDT Print View

What brand deodorant is everyone using? Mine will not melt in the microwave. I packed it in a CS tube but it just breaks apart.

Jeff McWilliams
(jjmcwill) - M

Locale: Midwest
Tom's of Maine on 09/18/2012 07:04:42 MDT Print View

I did it with Tom's of Maine deodorant and it worked well.

Tony Ronco
(tr-browsing) - MLife
Other Choices for a Mini Deodorant Dispensing Container on 10/10/2012 12:40:31 MDT Print View

As an alternative to recycling chapstick dispensers, all these work as well. (As I'm one of those who prefer using deodorant, and washing where I can)
Band-Aid Friction Block Stick .34 oz.
Band-Aid Friction Block Stick .34 oz. (Already mentioned in Tyler's post)
Neutrogena Wet Skin Kids SPF#70 Stick 0.47 oz.
Neutrogena Wet Skin Kids Stick 0.47 oz. There is also a Baby Version as well - same size
Bodyglide Anti-chafe Balm Pocket Size .21oz
Bodyglide Anti-chafe Balm Pocket Size .21oz - somewhat awkward to use as a deodorant dispenser, but still works.


For me, the Band-Aid Friction Block size dispenser lasts a week (with one application per day)

No need to melt a commercial product, as the deodorants I use (which are not antiperspirants) easily "extrude" into the empty container.

Edited by tr-browsing on 10/10/2012 12:49:12 MDT.

Sterling Johnson
(SterlingJohnson) - F
Re: Deodorant in a chapstick tube on 10/10/2012 18:56:20 MDT Print View

Wow! what a coincidince! I had been thinking about this for a while and thought I might as well try it. Although I used original scent old spice the concept is still the same.I think I did mine about two to three weeks ago and it works really well for when you dont need a full stick, like I leave in in my gym locker. To solve the problem of maybe putting it on my lips, since I store it next to my chapstick, I sanded off the labels and boldly labeled it "DEODERANT". Anyway, happy trails.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: "Deodorant in a chapstick tube" on 10/10/2012 19:19:50 MDT Print View

Not wishing to offend anyone, but I find the whole idea of taking a deodorant walking to be strange and rather pointless.

Since the normal method of action for a deodorant is to block your sweat glands, either this is a bad idea or it simply won't work (like when climbing a hill).

Cheers

Andrew McAlister
(mcalista) - F
re: still useful on 10/10/2012 19:26:59 MDT Print View

Roger,

I kinda agree, but I imagine it would still be useful when resupplying in trail towns, or travelling home afterwards with non-hikers.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Re: "Deodorant in a chapstick tube" on 10/10/2012 22:19:00 MDT Print View

Roger, for a smart guy, you seem to have mixed up the functions of deodorants and antiperspirants. Killing bacteria whose byproducts smell bad is one effect and is different that stopping sweating which cools the body.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: "Deodorant in a chapstick tube" on 10/11/2012 01:01:49 MDT Print View

Hi David

> mixed up the functions of deodorants and antiperspirants.
Point.
I get confused by the marketing claims for all this stuff. The ads I've seen don't make a great distinction - not that I have paid them much attention anyhow.

My experience has been that once I cool down and dry off, whatever smell there is drops significantly. Great fuss about nothing.

Cheers

Kevin Beeden
(captain_paranoia) - F

Locale: UK
re: deodorant on 10/11/2012 11:23:07 MDT Print View

> My experience has been that once I cool down and dry off, whatever smell there is drops significantly.

Different people have different bacterial flora on their bodies, determined by a whole range of factors, and exacerbated by the type of clothing they wear. It may be that your body has a 'benign' flora, that means you don't smell too bad. Others may not be so lucky, and they may honk.

Or they may wear Helly Hansen LIFA base layers...

I don't wear deodorant or antiperspirant, and I'm lucky that I don't stink too badly, unless I'm doing something where I'll be very anxious or scared. I usually carry a small atomiser of alcohol-based eau de cologne of some mild fragance, and give a squirt in morning and after I've had a quick wash.

Ron Jameson
(tigerpaws) - M

Locale: Upstate SC
Deodorant on 10/11/2012 12:45:38 MDT Print View

Y'all just need to learn to embrace the funk!!
BigRed77

Tony Ronco
(tr-browsing) - MLife
Smelly Funky: To Be or Not to Be - THAT is the question on 10/12/2012 11:50:07 MDT Print View

RE: Ron's "Y'all just need to learn to embrace the funk!!"

LOL

Actually, I for one, have gone that route and after smelling up my clothes, my quilt (which is a pain to wash), and my sleeping pad (=amazingly) ... not to mention the aromatic inconvenience of sharing a shelter - I've made the personal decision to minimize "the funk" when & where it can be pragmatic. This thread is mostly focused on one of the logistical aspects of that (i.e. lightweight deodorant ... the other is the quick on-the-go "wash up" ... but that's a topic for another post)

Think of as a HYOH thing ;-)

Edited by tr-browsing on 10/12/2012 12:44:41 MDT.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Deodorant in a chapstick tube on 10/12/2012 12:25:04 MDT Print View

I take a splash of hand sanitizer and throw it on my armpits. It works well.

Steven McAllister
(brooklynkayak) - MLife

Locale: Atlantic North East
Re: Deodorant in a chapstick tube on 09/19/2013 06:22:10 MDT Print View

The problem with deodorants, including the herbal ones and not unscented antiperspirants is that deodorants invariably contain ingredients that have a scent that attracts critters.

One example was when I borrowed a friends sunscreen because mine was in the bottom of my pack.
She had been bothered by flying insects something fierce, while I wasn't, at least until I used her sunscreen.

The issue is not just bugs, other animals can be attracted and may want to chew through your gear following the scent.

No deodorant/antiperspirant is the only way to go when backpacking.

Nice to have something for off the trail though. The only reason I would carry any.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Deodorant in a chapstick tube on 09/19/2013 09:58:23 MDT Print View

More chemicals and crap to add to the ever growing abundance of chemicals and crap we put into this world and onto our bodies.

No deodorant here, on or off the trail.

Tony Ronco
(tr-browsing) - MLife
That philosophical approach can apply to food too. on 09/19/2013 10:24:25 MDT Print View

First, an apology for taking this thread off topic. This is just an out-of-left-field observation ...

RE: "More chemicals and crap to add to the ever growing abundance of chemicals and crap we put into this world and onto our bodies."

hmm, by substituting out the word "onto" with "into" in the above statement, that would make that philosophical approach apply to food as well.

For food, one can't utilize the "opt out" approach ... maybe instead, utilize an "organic vegan" approach?

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
. on 09/19/2013 10:38:00 MDT Print View

.

Edited by justin_baker on 09/19/2013 10:39:18 MDT.

Daniel Collins
(Diablo-V)

Locale: Orlando FL
anti-perspirant vs deoderant on 09/21/2013 22:59:08 MDT Print View

I agree that perfumes don't belong on the trail, but I read somewhere that anti-perspirant can be used on the feet to reduce feet sweating.

I found some alum based unscented anti-perspirant in the pharmacy and bought it with the intent of keeping a small amount of it in my foot care kit.

Does anyone use anti-perspirant on their feet ?

Unrelated but is Triclosan treated baby wipes or gels bad for you ?