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Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
a small steel can on 03/16/2012 12:44:45 MDT Print View

This is sort of a cooking question, and it is sort of a MYOG question.

I have a standard recipe for Boston Brown Bread, and in traditional style, this bread is baked inside ordinary wide steel cans, like for vegetables or fruit. It works good and lasts a long time.

Now, for backpacking purposes, I want to do the same recipe, but I want to bake it into narrow round loaves about the size of a Hostess Twinkie. You can understand the desire for a compact food. However, I can't find any steel cans that small in diameter. The correct size would be about like a Red Bull can, except that it must be steel. An aluminum can might not survive the oven baking. Also, I will probably need to adjust the baking time somewhat.

Any suggestions?

--B.G.--

Walter Carrington
(Snowleopard) - M

Locale: Mass.
Storage/spice/tea containers. on 03/16/2012 13:36:50 MDT Print View

There are small steel cans used for storage or spices with a clear top; maybe you could modify it to replace the acrylic part of the top replaced with a can top. They hold 6.8 oz or 3.3 oz.
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=10154&cat=1,43326
Bed Bath and Beyond sells them for spices in a 3.5 oz size.
There are also tea containers, sold in plain steel here, also miscellaneous tins:
http://www.specialtybottle.com/tinteasmoothsquare51wsliplid.aspx

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Storage/spice/tea containers. on 03/16/2012 13:51:42 MDT Print View

Sorry, I got sidetracked when I hit Casket Hardware.

I don't need any can top, but it must have a bottom.

I'm thinking the optimum size is about 8-10 fluid ounces.

--B.G.--

d k
(dkramalc) - MLife
Re: Re: Storage/spice/tea containers. on 03/16/2012 14:11:22 MDT Print View

Have you tried baking in the Red Bull cans? They might survive OK (I wouldn't use lined cans, though).

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife
Re: a small steel can on 03/16/2012 14:11:43 MDT Print View

Using this at home? How about a corn bread pan?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Storage/spice/tea containers. on 03/16/2012 14:16:06 MDT Print View

I don't know how to get the plastic liner out of a Red Bull can. Too much trouble.

I have what I call cornbread pans, but they are a small rectangular loaf size. Are there some the size of a Red Bull can?

Ideally, I will find steel cans that can be repurposed into this.

--B.G.--

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife
Re:small cornbread on 03/16/2012 14:19:14 MDT Print View

I've seen pans that are patterned after little ears of corn. About 8 or 10 to a pan. Each loaf/ear is not much bigger than a Twinkie.

If you could live with hockey puck shaped loaves you could use a muffin top pan.

Edited by kthompson on 03/16/2012 14:20:31 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re:small cornbread on 03/16/2012 14:34:25 MDT Print View

I think I have one muffin pan for small size muffins. That will get me the closest.

Pans patterned after little ears of corn? That sounds like a Midwestern thing.

At present, my standard trail snack is Logan Bread, and it is cut into squares that are about 2x2 inches. The Boston Brown Bread could be baked in a pan the same way, I suppose. It's just that Boston Brown Bread is supposed to be round, sliced like a thin hockey puck.

--B.G.--

John Nausieda
(Meander) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: Re:small cornbread on 03/16/2012 15:14:52 MDT Print View

How about small tomato paste cans ?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: Re:small cornbread on 03/16/2012 15:26:19 MDT Print View

Tomato paste cans and condensed milk cans have a nice diameter, but they are awfully short. It would require about twenty of them to hold a batch of batter.

--B.G.--

Will Webster
(WillWeb) - M
Re: a small steel can on 03/16/2012 15:34:17 MDT Print View

Assuming you're baking at home, would you consider a conventional can and then cutting the loaves lengthwise into quarters?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: a small steel can on 03/16/2012 16:01:01 MDT Print View

Yes, I can slice the loaves. They might get mashed up a bit when carried in a backpack pocket. For that matter, I can bake them in the standard size steel cans, but then I would need to slice them and bag them individually.

Like everything else, I was looking for good durability, easily to eat, easy to digest, cheap and easy to bake at home, and minimal wrapping or packaging.

It's really kind of hard to beat Logan Bread. I put six squares of that into one ziploc bag, and that makes six big snacks. Logan Bread is more durable than Boston Brown Bread.

--B.G.--

Will Webster
(WillWeb) - M
Logan on 03/16/2012 16:11:51 MDT Print View

Agree about the Logan bread. My wife has actually given up hot breakfast on the trail - as long as I bring her a cup if tea with her Logan bread.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Logan on 03/16/2012 16:16:11 MDT Print View

I can go a long way on Logan Bread, hot tea, and Gatorade.

--B.G.--

John Nausieda
(Meander) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: Re: a small steel can on 03/16/2012 16:29:49 MDT Print View

Try this or maybe a candle mold .
http://www.amazon.com/Norpro-Piece-Canape-Bread-Mold/dp/B0000VLYP4/ref=sr_1_46?ie=UTF8&qid=1331936875&sr=8-46

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: Re: a small steel can on 03/16/2012 16:34:24 MDT Print View

"Canape-Bread-Mold"

That could be effective. Perhaps overkill.

I really do like the principle of Recycle, Reuse, Rebuild.

--B.G.--

John Nausieda
(Meander) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: a small steel can on 03/16/2012 17:05:15 MDT Print View

I do too. If you can find some old steel tennis ball cans they would work I think.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife
Re: a small steel can on 03/16/2012 17:30:14 MDT Print View

Sapporo beer. Comes in a stainless can.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: a small steel can on 03/16/2012 18:14:53 MDT Print View

"Sapporo beer. Comes in a stainless can."

What size is this?

--B.G.--

Diane Pinkers
(dipink) - M

Locale: Western Washington
lined muffin pan on 03/16/2012 18:28:23 MDT Print View

I would use Reynolds aluminum foil muffin liners, in the heaviest muffin pan you can find. I used to bake a traditional Easter Russian bread called Kulick in a coffee can, as that was the closest shape I could find to a traditional mold. Found that it was unnecessary, a bread pan works fine, just have to adjust the time slightly.

I had to switch when my boyfriend's office switched from a coffee that came in a metal can to one that comes in plastic cannisters--can't bake in plastic!

I love Boston Brown Bread, with baked beans. Sigh, definitely not on my current diet.

I read in a book on hiking meals that someone had had Logan Bread nutritionally analyzed, and it came out close to graham crackers. Never tried it, myself.