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Steven Hanlon
(asciibaron) - F

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Super Cat stove musings on 03/16/2012 05:50:35 MDT Print View

so i decided to make a Super Cat stove and picked up a 3 oz can of cat food (for my cat) and a quart of denatured alcohol. got home, removed the food, cleaned the can, and poked the holes in it. i added an ounce of alcohol, set it alight, waited for it to really get going, placed my filled pot on the stove and...

the flame went out.

i made the holes larger and things were going great until... the inside of the can caught fire. apparently the can i bought is steel with a vinyl coating inside. doh! so now i have a melty mess of a can, a very nasty smelling pot, and quite a mess to clean up on the patio.

of course this would not have happened if i bought the food that cost 54 cents, but no, i had to save 7 cents!

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife
Re: Super Cat stove musings on 03/16/2012 06:26:55 MDT Print View

That story is worth every penny!

Steven Hanlon
(asciibaron) - F

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Re: Re: Super Cat stove musings on 03/16/2012 07:01:10 MDT Print View

"That story is worth every penny!"

Ken, are you saying my story is only worth 47 cents? if so, i need some better stories

heheh.

Edited by asciibaron on 03/16/2012 07:01:47 MDT.

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: Super Cat stove musings on 03/16/2012 07:08:54 MDT Print View

Steven,

You could have spent about $10.54 on yourself and your cat...

Aluminum bottles

...and made yourself one of these...

Budweiser aluminum bottle stove

...making both of you happy! LOL

I've had no issues with interior of my stove igniting the liner which I believe does exist inside of these bottles. It is, I believe however, much thinner and if it ever did ignite it has probably burned away without mimicking the incident you described.

Better luck next time. Be safe and never give up!

Party On,

Newton

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife
Re: Super Cat stove musings on 03/16/2012 07:17:56 MDT Print View

Just the 7





kidding

Steven Hanlon
(asciibaron) - F

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Re: Re: Super Cat stove musings on 03/16/2012 07:32:35 MDT Print View

"Just the 7"

that's what i feared. this weekend will be epic and worth, minimum, 79 cents.

@ John

i like the idea, but i'm not buying Bud, i do have a number of Yuengling Black and Tan cans lying about, they are going to be used for the can stove creation.

Edited by asciibaron on 03/16/2012 07:35:11 MDT.

Richard Brownkatz
(Rbrownkatz) - F

Locale: Southeast
ahh on 03/16/2012 07:49:42 MDT Print View

So begins the next slide down the slippery slope...

Steven Hanlon
(asciibaron) - F

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Re: ahh on 03/16/2012 07:52:14 MDT Print View

"So begins the next slide down the slippery slope..."

it all started with a simple comment on my gear list

"hey, that fleece is pretty heavy at 18.85 oz, i can do better than that!"

i wasn't supposed to be buying new gear this year...

Edited by asciibaron on 03/16/2012 07:53:26 MDT.

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: ...the slippery slope... on 03/16/2012 08:01:26 MDT Print View

"I wasn't supposed to be buying new gear this year..."

That is why I bought my Lightheart Gear Solo on sale just this past Christmas Eve night. ;-)

I am not a smoker but I have a question.

How well does the Yuengling Black and Tan go with the moving away from cigars over to pipe tobacco?

Party On,

Newton

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: ahh on 03/16/2012 08:08:01 MDT Print View

You have a fleece jacket that weighs 18.85 oz - and fleece provides relatively little warmth - that's crazy!

You could have a quilt or sleeping bag at that weight that would actually keep you warm : )

Steven Hanlon
(asciibaron) - F

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Re: Re: ...the slippery slope... on 03/16/2012 08:29:55 MDT Print View

"How well does the Yuengling Black and Tan go with the moving away from cigars over to pipe tobacco?"

i smoke a traditional English blend pipe tobacco so the Black and Tan is much better than a mega hopped IPA. i tried that last night and the result was about as good as the stove experiment. too many contrasting flavors. it was like eating a tuna sandwich with salt and vinegar potato chips.

Edited by asciibaron on 03/16/2012 08:32:51 MDT.

Steven Hanlon
(asciibaron) - F

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Re: Re: Re: ahh on 03/16/2012 08:31:38 MDT Print View

"You have a fleece jacket that weighs 18.85 oz - and fleece provides relatively little warmth - that's crazy!"

i now have a fleece jacket that weighs 14 ounces, cost 10 bucks and is so much warmer than the 18.85 ounce disaster jacket.

live and learn.

Tyler H
(ctwnwood) - F

Locale: Utah
beer bottle stove on 03/16/2012 09:10:35 MDT Print View

Newt!

How have I not seen these on BPL before?

Any chance you've got some photos of the process? Looks very straight forward but just curious about how you attached the base and from what part of the can the stove section came.

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: beer bottle stove on 03/16/2012 09:53:50 MDT Print View

Tyler,

The stove is made from the bottom section of the aluminum bottle.

The base is a lid from a soup can. It was removed using a safety style side cutting can opener. The base is not permanetly attached to the stove. The stove just seems to nest realy well in the formed rings of the lid.

Construction pics do not exist. The holes are approximately 1/4" paper punched into the bottle bottom equally spaced apart. In the picture it appears that there are at least 11 holes but I believe it is actually 12. I'll be able to get a good accurate count later.

The stove height is as I remember 1 & 3/4" tall. Again an accurate measurement is forthcoming. I cut the bottom section off of the whole bottle using a Buck Bros. mini hacksaw from Home Depot. I kept the marking around the bottle "square" by wrapping a straight edge of a piece of paper around the bottle at the 1 3/4" mark and tracing the edge with a pointy Sharpie.

Buck Bros mini hacksaw

I dressed up the edges of the hacksaw cut with a file and then by rubbing it on a piece of sandpaper/emery cloth laid flat on a workbench.

I fill the stove with 1/2 oz to 1 oz of alcohol and put a few drops of alcohol in the priming pan/base. I light the alcohol in the stove first and then the priming pan afterwards. I watch for the fuel to start "boiling" and the jets/holes to blossom. Then I set down my pot of cold water onto the stove slowly and gently to avoid snuffing the flame and pressurize the jet holes.

It helps to use a long piece of straw, pine needle or a spaghetti sized dry stick to light the stove and priming pan/base. The alcohol flame is invisible in daylight and is quite hot. ;-)

Works for me!

BTW experiment with the fuel amounts and burn times. I tried using a snuffer and once this stove gets going there is no snuffing it out. I just let it run out of fuel and extinguish itself. When it is cooled off I pack it up. Simple, cheap and light.

Party On,

Newton

Edited by Newton on 03/20/2012 20:41:31 MDT.

Tyler H
(ctwnwood) - F

Locale: Utah
re: re: beer bottle stove on 03/16/2012 10:29:16 MDT Print View

Newton, thanks for the always prompt and thorough information.

I've made a few popcan stoves and a supercat, the supercat is superior for various reasons.

I've been using it with the bottom of a Foster's can as a snuff can which works well enough for me, admittedly a little bit sketchy when it's really roaring.

Does the primer pan just help to heat up the alcohol faster?

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: The primer pan on 03/16/2012 11:07:38 MDT Print View

Tyler,

"Does the primer pan just help to heat up the alcohol faster"?

Yep! ;-)

Without it the process is much sloooooowwwer and wastes precious fuel.

How is that for prompt? LOL

Party On,

Newton

Keith Bassett
(keith_bassett)

Locale: Pacific NW
Re: Re: Re: Re: ahh on 03/16/2012 12:02:23 MDT Print View

And fleece remains fairly warm in soaking rain. Down and light synthetics, not so much especially in a place that never dries out.

Where did you find the el cheapo? Sounds like it might be worth looking into.

Stove Note, I like the beer bottles for stove building too - and they are darn near indestructible. The whitebox style stoves are really tough, but may take a bit to bloom if it is stupid cold. Lots of thermal mass in that aluminum bottle that needs to heat up.

Supercat style stoves are better for that concern.

Pressurized popcan stoves are more fun to build. If you just want to play with a stove, try making a few of those. :) They are light and heat well, but truthfully making them is like eating popcorn. You just can't stop.

Steven Hanlon
(asciibaron) - F

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Second attempt... on 03/16/2012 15:12:29 MDT Print View

I picked up a fancy feast can on the way home and made a new stove. I can not bring 16oz of water to a boil with one fl oz of denatured alcohol. The denatured alcohol is the SLX from Walmart. The fuel is completely consumed after 8 minutes and the pot has bubbles at the bottom.

Any thoughts on why it's not boiling? I put 19 holes in the top row and 18 in the bottom, is that too many?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Second attempt... on 03/16/2012 15:32:52 MDT Print View

If you don't get a boil, then it is generally from one of a few reasons:

1. Your boiling pot is too large for the burner. So, heat is lost from the top of it almost as fast as heat is going into the bottom.
2. Your boiling pot has no lid.
3. Your burner is not insulated from the cold surface underneath it. You need to be able to warm up the alcohol very quickly.
4. Your windscreen is inadequate.
5. Your fuel is funky. Consider warming it up to body temperature before pouring it into the burner.
6. You are not using a priming pan with a few drops of fuel there.
7. You have strange holes in the top of the burner. Either too many or too few. Maybe too small or too close to the edge.

--B.G.--

Steven Hanlon
(asciibaron) - F

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Re: Re: Second attempt... on 03/16/2012 15:36:28 MDT Print View

"3. Your burner is not insulated from the cold surface underneath it. "

i'm going to go with this - i was doing the testing on a glass top patio table in 56F temps. it was close enough to a boil for my needs right now, but i might get another can next week and actually follow the directions :)