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Mark Verber
(verber) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Drying Clothing with Body Heat in Propre Raingear on 01/29/2007 11:07:31 MST Print View

Has anyone noticed that in some conditions clothing might dry more quickly under propore rain gear like dropstopper than in the open air? I am wondering whether I am crazy, or if this might be the case.

This is the third or forth trip over than last four years where it seems like my shirt dried more quickly with a propore jacket on (rainshield o2 or dropstoppers), than when it was left uncovered. I have wondered whether the added heat accumulation might offset the vapor resistance of propore. Anyone have thoughts?

The most recent experience was this weekend. On and off ight drizzle, temp was around 60F, 700ft/mile elevation gain for a good stretch, humidity around 90%, a light breeze, no sun, and a non breathable backpack.

I am pretty sure my sweat was producing more moisture that the on/off drizzle because my sleeves were damp but my back was soaked from the backpack. Eventually the trail leveled out, the drizzle stopped for awhile, so I switched to carrying the backpack to one shoulder and dropped my pace a bit to let my back dry out. After around 40 minutes my back still seemed quit damp. I stopped for around 10 minutes. During that time I put on my Dropstoppers Jacket. I immediately felt some added warm and the wind blocking. When I got up to move again I notice that my back was significantly drier. Did the jacket speed the process somehow, our was it the total stop of work? What do you think?


--mark

John Carter
(jcarter1)

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Drying Clothing with Body Heat in Propre Raingear on 01/29/2007 13:21:46 MST Print View

I wonder if it helps keep humidity out of your clothing. I've noticed on cool, humid days that I feel quite clammy, even if I am not sweating. I've assumed it's the dampness around me. Perhaps the propore prevents this from accumulating in your baselayer. Or perhaps you noticed the chill a little less with the propore on; without the jacket you can feel the dampness due to a higher evaporative cooling rate than with the jacket on. In other words, it may be just as damp, but that dampness is closer to your skin's temperature with the jacket on, so you notice it less. Any others with suggestions?

Edited by jcarter1 on 01/29/2007 13:22:23 MST.

Mark Verber
(verber) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Re: Drying Clothing with Body Heat in Propre Raingear on 01/29/2007 15:59:21 MST Print View

I don't think it was just the moisture getting warmer. Before I put the jacket on my hand would get damp as I ran it across the back of the shirt. After the break with the dropstopper jacket on, the was noticeably less damp and stayed that way for the rest of the hike... even when it chilled back down with the outside air.

--Mark

Richard Matthews
(food) - F

Locale: Colorado Rockies
Re: Drying Clothing with Body Heat in Propre Raingear on 01/29/2007 16:42:03 MST Print View

No theoretical help, but I agree with your observation. With ****-Tex I wait until I feel the chill to layer up, but with the propore I layer up immediately.