Question for the old farts....
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Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Question for the old farts.... on 01/25/2012 18:12:14 MST Print View

So I keep getting these darned AARP mailings. I've resisted joining for 3 years now since, well, generally, I'm not much of a joiner. So you older guys (if you've forgotten who you are, asked your wives), do you belong to AARP. Why or why not?

Thanks!

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Question for the old farts.... on 01/25/2012 18:22:28 MST Print View

Renee has been getting those too. She like you is against joining on principle. It's just a creatively marketed insurance of some sort isn't it? I'm not quite at old fart status(geezers around here)yet. Age wise anyways.

Travis Leanna
(T.L.) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
Re: Re: Question for the old farts.... on 01/25/2012 18:23:07 MST Print View

Don't feel bad Doug. I've been getting AARP mailings since I was 22. They even sent me a membership card once.

Richard Cullip
(RichardCullip)

Locale: San Diego County
Getting Old on 01/25/2012 18:27:40 MST Print View

Doug

I turned 60 this past November and I've been getting those AARP mailing for a long time now. I can't actually remember when they started to come (maybe I'll ask my wife) but I haven't joined yet. One of these days I might succumb and join but I've been resisting since it seems that signing up would be a declaration to the world at large that I'm getting old. Just not ready to admit it yet.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Question for the old farts.... on 01/25/2012 18:31:35 MST Print View

"Why or why not?"

Cheap auto insurance and, when you get to the point where you really do have trouble remembering who you are, an excellent Medicare supplemental insurance plan. The catch is that you have to remember to enroll.

Carl Umland
(chumland) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Crest Trail, mostly
"Question for the old farts...." on 01/25/2012 18:32:08 MST Print View

Douglas,
Does being born in 1944 count as an old fart? If so here's my take on AARP. While it may have a lot of good info for ageing, retirement planning etc. in its periodicals. It also is a good lobbying group for seniors. However I've come to the conclusion that it basically is a clever and convienient way to sell insurance.
Old Dudes Drule @#*&%^ Drool Rule.
Best,
Carl

Richard Scruggs
(JRScruggs) - MLife

Locale: Oregon
Re: Question for the old farts.... on 01/25/2012 18:40:55 MST Print View

COF . . . COF . . . COF . . . well, COF . . . COF . . . since you ask, that would be a yes and a no.

That's a "no" because AARP's politics are, well, let's say, not our style.

That's a "yes" because of the remote chance that AARP might, just might, offer a benefit sometime that makes the dues worth it.

Hasn't happened yet, so might be a double "no" one of these days.

If you would like a recommendation for a good way to "invest" in joining something, and get a "for sure benefit" in those Golden Years, check out a life membership with Trout Unlimited.

You get a nice Winston rod and Waterworks-Lamson reel with that membership:

https://www.tumembership.org/member/life

Together, the rod and reel are worth a big chunk of the life fee.

Plus, you know the rest of the fee goes to a good purpose. Or, you could waive the rod & reel so all of the fee benefits fisheries, and get full tax deduction.

Don't believe AARP will ever give out a deal like that.

("COF" -- Cranky Old Fart)

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Question for the old farts.... on 01/25/2012 18:54:13 MST Print View

I never see AARP advocating for things that I suspect most of us would agree on - more funding for State and National Parks, for instance. But they do promote nonsensical positions like, "National healthcare is wrong. But don't touch our Medicare."

So I cut out the membership card they send once a month and save 15% on motels when I'm on the road. It often works, but increasingly as AARP has gotten so loose about membership that hotels in competitive markets insist on an actual age limit (60 or 65) rather than AARP membership.

If I want in on an insurance pool, I'd rather be in you lot (active hikers) than with geriatics who stay home and read junk mail.

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
Over 50 qualify on 01/25/2012 19:25:23 MST Print View

I've been getting their mailings for a number of years, somehow they get info on you to know when you turn 50. Getting discounts on insurance would be a plus, but I work out of town, so I never get to talk with someone local to see if I might want to change. I don't care for their politics and don't care to join them in general.

Duane

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Question for the old farts.... on 01/25/2012 19:37:03 MST Print View

"So I cut out the membership card they send once a month and save 15% on motels when I'm on the road"

I do that with Good Sam. Cut out the membership card they send me avery once in a while. Discount on campground fees. Sometimes you can just say you're a member, and sometimes they insist on seeing a card.

AARP is mainly an insurance company.

Yeah - they lobby against national healthcare - they make money off Medicare Advantage so they lobby for that.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Question for the old farts.... on 01/25/2012 19:46:01 MST Print View

Well I'm not old and rarely fart... Just grey.

If you travel a lot many businesses offer an AARP discount. I used it for a couple of years. Then during a senior moment I forgot my card and the hotel wouldn't give me a discount, but they would give me a larger discount with a AAA card. So you can surmise which I now belong. No other benefit that I can see unless you would like to read their monthly magazine, chock full of ads for worthless products targeted at old people.

I suppose there are people who find benefits, but the are probably not lightweight backpackers. :)

Edited by ngatel on 01/25/2012 19:47:26 MST.

Art ...
(asandh) - F
Re: Question for the old farts.... on 01/25/2012 19:51:27 MST Print View

you don't have to like Everything about an organization to gain some benefit from it.
the membership dues are not that steep for what you may reap.

Kimberly Wersal
(kwersal) - MLife

Locale: Western Colorado
Re: Re: Question for the old farts.... on 01/25/2012 21:44:01 MST Print View

I prefer "fartlette", thank you.

I have been a member (it was cheap enough) for a couple of years, but almost wish I had never joined due to the constant bombardment of AARP related junk mail! The hotel discounts can come in handy, though....

Bob Bankhead
(wandering_bob) - MLife

Locale: Oregon, USA
Question for the old farts.... on 01/25/2012 22:04:18 MST Print View

The AARP Medicare Supplement insurance is fabulous stuff, and you don't have to be an AARP member to buy it.

AARP is not an insurance agency, nor do they sell insurance. United Health Care sells the insurance and pays AARP a fee to use their name.

Ike Jutkowitz
(Ike) - M

Locale: Central Michigan
AARP on 01/26/2012 07:14:59 MST Print View

I've been getting mailings from them for the last 10 years. It's freaking me out. Starting to wonder if they know something I don't....

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Question for the old farts.... on 01/26/2012 15:49:47 MST Print View

"I suppose there are people who find benefits, but the are probably not lightweight backpackers."

You would suppose wrong. :0)