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Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
@Nick: Please keep the finds coming! -- Okay, Watches on 01/23/2012 20:43:34 MST Print View

Are they gear? Doesn't almost everyone bring one with them?

I have had 3 backpacking watches over the years (sort of). A couple years ago I asked my wife to get me a Casio Solar Does-Everything-On-Earth watch, and it is too heavy and too complicated. But I take it once in a while. So here are my watches.

#1 - US Military MIL-W-3818B watch. Benrus 17 jewel movement, self-winding (for Bob G it is non-hacking). Still keeps perfect time. It was issued to me in 1970, and I "retired" in 1990 because it was becoming a collector item, and I was tired of winding it every day.

#2 - In 1990 I bought a Victronix Swiss Army watch, which is the first model they released (1989). Battery operated with a date wheel. I used this watch until a couple years ago. Again it was becoming a collector item, and I wanted something with a light and a little lighter. Still keeps perfect time.

#3 - 2010 an inexpensive Timex Expedition watch. Indiglo light and a couple of other minor features I can't figure out how to use.

Weights
Military Watch 40g or 1.41 oz.
Swiss Army Watch 45g or 1.59 oz.
Timex Expedition Watch 33g or 1.16 oz.

My favorite? Really hard to say. Military for sentimental reasons, Swiss Army is the easiest to read, and the Timex is light, has a light, and surprisingly rugged. Nowadays I always take the Timex.

IMG_0767
(L-R) Military, Swiss Army brand, Timex.

Edit: The bands on the older watches are not the originals.

Edited by ngatel on 01/23/2012 20:44:24 MST.

Jonathan Whitney
(WalksOn2Wheels) - F
Re: @Nick: Please keep the finds coming! -- Okay, Watches on 01/23/2012 20:52:41 MST Print View

Ha! I just spent a bit of time this evening re-weaving a band for my timex expedition. As you probably know, there are a slew of projects online for paracord projects. I had done a watch band in some standard nylon cord, but just picked up some actual 550 cord to do the timex.

Anyhow, all that to say that mine is 2.2 ounces with the chunky paracord, but it's about 9 or 10 feet of extra cord for "emergency" situations. I chose it because it was cheap (like 30 or 35 bucks at Target?) and had a light which is handy for around the tent at night, especially as to not wake the wife. I picked one up because I never wear a watch and wanted one for backpacking so that I could keep my phone off.

I consider it essential because you're generally going to want to know the time, and turning off and on a phone (what I did on my first trip) is just silly. You might need it for an emergency (if you even get a signal) and turning it off and on wille eat at the battery.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: @Nick: Please keep the finds coming! -- Okay, Watches on 01/23/2012 20:58:45 MST Print View

And do we have a picture of the watch to share? :)

I have only taken a phone twice backpacking, and it just isn't for me. Nothing wrong if others want to.

I have taken a couple longer trips without a watch, thinking I didn't need one and that it would help me cut the ties for a while. Well then I realized now much I used it for planning or estimating the next leg, to check my pace, and over the past 20 or so years to get back home on time, and by on time I mean on the correct day. I once was two days late for work because I didn't know what day it was, and I almost never miss work or am late.

Jonathan Whitney
(WalksOn2Wheels) - F
Re: Re: Re: @Nick: Please keep the finds coming! -- Okay, Watches on 01/23/2012 21:14:17 MST Print View

Well, since you asked:

Watch

Not my best work. Here is a link to this specific method:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Woven-paracord-braceletwatchband/

Edited by WalksOn2Wheels on 01/23/2012 21:17:27 MST.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: @Nick: Please keep the finds coming! -- Okay, Watches on 01/23/2012 21:17:50 MST Print View

nm

I had the Swiss Army one too. Until it was stolen. Nice clean design. I miss it still.

And yes a watch is gear.

Edited by kthompson on 01/24/2012 07:08:05 MST.

Jonathan Whitney
(WalksOn2Wheels) - F
Re: Re: @Nick: Please keep the finds coming! -- Okay, Watches on 01/23/2012 21:18:29 MST Print View

Ha! just fixed it as you were posting. Forgot my BPL manners for pictures.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: Re: Re: @Nick: Please keep the finds coming! -- Okay, Watches on 01/23/2012 21:27:30 MST Print View

Jonathan,

That is nice looking. I have never been interested in the idea of para-cord bracelets and stuff as a survival need, but I really enjoy looking at the craftsmanship and patterns. I may even get one someday as a jewelry item, since I normally don't wear jewelry... unless my wife catches me without the wedding band or the necklace she bought me :(

Erik Basil
(EBasil) - M

Locale: Atzlan
relativity on 01/23/2012 22:26:07 MST Print View

I don't have any outdoor watches that are very old, because I didn't have one that survived very well until I started with the Casio G-Shock. My current G-Shock weighs 70 grams, is 7 years old, runs on ambient light, calibrates to the Atomic Clock signal and has been hammered, slammed, dunked in paint, mud, sand, ocean, river and a vibratory, worn in high heat, freezing cold, on tools, handlebars and steering wheels. It's always spot-on with the time, is easy to read with 1/2" tall numerals and is the stylistic basis for my super-zoot G-Shock smart phone.

I can't get a new watch until this one dies, and it shows no signs...

Eric Braun
(Dukedante) - F
Re: Re: Re: Re: @Nick: Please keep the finds coming! -- Okay, Watches on 01/24/2012 06:59:55 MST Print View

Not your best work? That is fantastic! I love the color cord you chose, matches the dial nicely. Well done.