Quilt warmth of a single layer of 1.8 primaloft.
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Troy Ammons
(tammons) - F
Quilt warmth of a single layer of 1.8 primaloft. on 01/18/2012 15:14:32 MST Print View

Purely a summer warm weather hyperlight quilt.

The inner will be .5 oz silk and outer .75 oz M55.
Should come in at 12 oz.

I am thinking maybe 55dF ??

Thanks

Chris Muthig
(cmuthig) - M

Locale: Georgia
Re: Quilt warmth of a single layer of 1.8 primaloft. on 01/19/2012 06:55:37 MST Print View

Just a thought, but I made a similar quilt out of 2.5 Apex that weighted in at 13oz and could go to about 45.

If you could find your hands on some of that, it might be easier to use and nearly as light. I believe I heard that thru-hiker hopes to get more this spring.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Quilt warmth of a single layer of 1.8 primaloft. on 01/19/2012 07:03:13 MST Print View

3 oz primaloft is about 2 clo

so 1.8 oz would be 1.2 clo

1.2 clo would provide about 75 F lower sleeping comfort limit if you were naked inside

What are you wearing inside?

Hobbes W
(Hobbesatronic) - F

Locale: SoCal
CLO values on 01/19/2012 08:45:21 MST Print View

"1.2 clo would provide about 75 F lower sleeping comfort limit if you were naked inside."

Ah Jerry, now you've done it - you've gone ahead and introduced scientific values that help destroy marketing hype. ;|

To the OP, you might consider searching some of R Nisely's older clo value threads. In essence, you need a clo value of around 3.25 to be comfortable sleeping at 55 degrees F, and, as Jerry notes, around 1.2 to hit 75.

Interestingly, you only need a clo of around .8 (ie dressed) to be comfortable **sitting** @ 70-75. That means you're burning approx 1.5x as many calories sitting vs sleeping.

For those considering Sierra summer bags, 30 is the usual target range since it can (and does) dip below freezing even in August @ higher elevations. 30 requires a clo of around 6.5, which loosely translates to around 7.5 oz of syn or 2.2" of down loft. (Hence the 2" of loft [one side] in the 32 degree WM summerlite.)

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: CLO values on 01/19/2012 09:18:14 MST Print View

Good Richard thread:

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/xdpy/forum_thread/9378/index.html

But, I think maybe it overestimates the required amount of insulation a little

Dustin Short
(upalachango) - MLife
Re: Re: CLO values on 01/19/2012 11:39:12 MST Print View

Richard's values are definitely conservative but accurate. This is probably because they're based of EN standards and they are designed to be accurate for a majority of the population, not just the average or median values (ie those clo values should work for 90% or so of people).

Also I think the linear regressions lose a lot of accuracy when temperatures are warmer, like 45F and above. But regardless the error still falls on the side of conservative so at worse you'll just end up with gear that's comfortable even colder than you intended!