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HK Newman
(hknewman) - MLife

Locale: Western US
Best UL groundsheet? - Info needed on 01/06/2012 08:42:29 MST Print View

What's the best lightweight groundsheet out there that can be used as a shelter floor in multiple environments? Kind of thinking in the minimalism vein so I have only one choice in the gear closet.

Silnylon is def out since it attracts sand, and not sure Tyvek is all that sturdy

(ed: post title)

Edited by hknewman on 01/06/2012 08:43:10 MST.

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: Best UL groundsheet? - Info needed on 01/06/2012 08:50:47 MST Print View

Polycryo

http://www.amazon.com/Frost-V73H-Indoor-42-Inch-62-Inch/dp/B000BQKCQ0

http://gossamergear.com/shelters/polycryo-ground-cloth-large.html

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/reviews/display_reviews.html?forum_thread_id=3513

Edited by annapurna on 01/06/2012 09:10:38 MST.

John Abela
(JohnAbela) - MLife

Locale: www.hikelighter.com
Re: Best UL groundsheet? - Info needed on 01/06/2012 09:23:20 MST Print View

Two of the top favorites are:

ZPacks Cuben Fiber Groundsheet

Gossamer Gear Polycryo Ground Cloth

Kevin Babione
(KBabione) - MLife

Locale: Pennsylvania
Best UL Groundsheet on 01/06/2012 09:29:18 MST Print View

Another vote for Polycro...I purchased a couple of them from Gossamer Gear and when I needed a big one I bought (for sleeping under the stars with my 5 year-old twins) I bought a heat-shrink set for weather-sealing a double-sliding door at my local hardware store (which is basically the same material as the Polycro).

Roger B
(rogerb) - MLife

Locale: Here and there
Re: Best UL groundsheet? - Info needed on 01/06/2012 09:33:09 MST Print View

Definitely polycro, used it for 20 days in Lapland and even a small cut did not get worse.

Tyvek, I have not had any problems (smell etc.) with Tyvek, but it is heavier.

Bob Bankhead
(wandering_bob) - MLife

Locale: Oregon, USA
Re: Re: Best UL groundsheet? - Info needed on 01/06/2012 10:17:17 MST Print View

I've used both and prefer Tyvek. Tyvek is considerably heavier than Polycro, but oh so much easier to fold and unfold.

Polycro handles like heavy-guage Saranwrap.

Fred Thorp
(BFThorp) - F
Polycro on 01/06/2012 10:19:05 MST Print View

...was shredded in a night or two on desert lava rock and gravel. It has worked fine in other areas.

Dustin Snyder
(DustinTSnyder)

Locale: Southeast
Re: Re: Best UL groundsheet? - Info needed on 01/06/2012 10:19:10 MST Print View

+1 on the polycro!
I have used mine for 30+ nights and would still be using it but it was blown away from under my shelter while I wasn't there.

Kyle Meyer
(kylemeyer) - M

Locale: Portland, OR
AMK Sol Heatsheet emergency blankets on 01/06/2012 10:20:13 MST Print View

I'm a fan of the AMK heatsheets. They're made out of polyetheline, not mylar like most emergency blankets, so they're much more durable. An oversized single person groundsheet weighs 2.5oz. I also like to think they provide a marginal improvement in ground insulation due to the reflective coating.

edit: you can view this luxurious groundsheet in my avatar.

Edited by kylemeyer on 01/06/2012 10:21:33 MST.

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: AMK Sol Heatsheet emergency blankets on 01/06/2012 10:37:10 MST Print View

Kurt, didn't you find the foil laminate peeling off in droves at the first use on the ground? I found my heat sheet unusable after one trip.

Diplomatic Mike
(MikefaeDundee)

Locale: Under a bush in Scotland
AMK Heatsheets on 01/06/2012 10:43:18 MST Print View

Same here. Mine was trashed after one use. It was punctured hundreds of times by pine needles, twigs, etc.

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
painters drop cloths on 01/06/2012 10:57:06 MST Print View

The "best" UL groundsheet is the one your probably already have in your garage or shop. Thin mil painters drop cloths work just fine as a ground sheet and are dirt cheap and available anywhere. I use polycro sheets now because I purchased a pack some time back and may as well use them up, but honestly I don't see them being incredibly advantageous to cheaper locally sourced options. A drop cloth, thin foam pad, and a lighteweight insulated inflatable has me covered for whatever.

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: painters drop cloths on 01/06/2012 11:04:16 MST Print View

I can buy these(polycryo)locally and cheap,and they are even cheaper in stores heading towards the end of winter.

same link I posted above from amazon, but most stores carry it

http://www.amazon.com/Frost-V73H-Indoor-42-Inch-62-Inch/dp/B000BQKCQ0

Chris S
(csteutterman) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: painters drop cloths on 01/06/2012 11:15:14 MST Print View

What thickness do you use? The last time I was looking at them at the hardware store I think they had 1 mil, 2 mil and 3 mil. Not sure if 1 mil is enough....or if 3 mil is overkill.

Jason G
(JasonG) - F

Locale: iceberg lake
polycro & heavy rain on 01/06/2012 11:20:17 MST Print View

I like the idea, foldability and weight of polycro but has anybody been in a heavy rain under a tarp with it? I feel like if water started running down under your tarp you couldn't prop up the polycro to keep it off your bag?

Marc Eldridge
(meld) - MLife

Locale: The here and now.
Re: Painters Drop Cloths on 01/06/2012 11:23:58 MST Print View

The 1 mil is too flimsy and the 3 and 4 mil is too heavy.

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
1 mil on 01/06/2012 11:47:39 MST Print View

1 mil.

It isn't going to last the course of an extended trip and will develop small pinholes eventually regardless of where you're camping.... but for overnights to week long trips they've worked well enough for me in the past when used in combination with a 1/4" foam pad and an inflatable. Sight selection and combing the area where your pad will lay goes a long way. Does anyone here have any feedback on those expensive Zpacks ground sheets? Spefically puncture resistance.

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: polycro & heavy rain on 01/06/2012 11:51:27 MST Print View

I always use a tarp and polycryo in the rainy NW and have never had problem.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: polycro & heavy rain on 01/06/2012 12:09:42 MST Print View

Jason wrote, "I like the idea, foldability and weight of polycro but has anybody been in a heavy rain under a tarp with it? I feel like if water started running down under your tarp you couldn't prop up the polycro to keep it off your bag?"

It doesn't take much of an edge. You can rake up a little duff with your foot to form a berm under the polycro if it looks like there might be run-off under your tarp--- better than digging and making a mess of the campsite and it can be scattered when you leave. More often, I use a larger size than my tarp perimeter often just roll the edge under, forming a small berm a few inches inside of the tarp edge.

Frost King has a large window insulation kit that is 62"x210", so you can get a couple large ground cloths from one. Make sure it is for outdoor use (Home Depot Model # V95QP Internet # 202262329)

Tyvek is tough, but heavier, bulkier and noisy when new. I like it for a tent footprint to protect the floor.

Edited by dwambaugh on 01/06/2012 12:11:31 MST.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: 1 mil on 01/06/2012 12:12:44 MST Print View

1 mil is pretty thin, maybe good for one trip

2 mil is better

3 mil - 2 ounces /square yard

2 mil - 1.3 oz/yd2

1 mil - 0.7 oz.yd2