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Adan Lopez
(Lopez) - F

Locale: San Gabriel Valley
Science project on 02/05/2012 20:27:46 MST Print View

Okay so I picked up some GU gels, honey stinger waffles and gels, nuun tablets. From what I'm reading in this thread it looks like I missed either endurolytes or s-tabs. Especially since cramps have been an issue lately. I'm always coated in salt when I get home, my hat too. All my weekend runs are over 3 hrs now so I have plenty of opportunities to work this out. Today I experimented with potato burritos and they worked fine, may try wheat tortillas instead though to make them less chewy. So far my plan is PBJ and potato burritos with gels, chips, s-tabs to top it off. No weiners , sorry Craig. Anything else I need? A fresh jalapeño maybe? Jalapeño makes anything taste better!!

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Greg's Marathon Training on 02/05/2012 20:41:07 MST Print View

You said it Greg; the basic problem is that I'm losing purpose on many of my mid-week runs.
I've fought this issue before, it's a tough one, easy to just get sort of sucked into mileage for mileage's sake (though I do typically enjoy ALL of my runs).

I know what my long runs are for: to run long, to build the ability to work for a long time. From previous marathons and 50Ks and other stuff, I get this.

But the shorter, mid-week runs? It's easy for them to simply be another run, leaving me not sure what they're actually helping, specifically.

And you said it: if it's not a tempo run, not a hill workout, not something specific, what is it then? Running for running's sake is fine, but running to run doesn't necessarily lead to big gains in hill running, speed, etc.

So I guess I'm really at a crossroads: get more serious with the type of some of the workouts I'm doing, or accept a certain level of "plateau", or slower progress, in my abilities. If many of the runs are just to run, that's fine for kicks, but I question if I'm not better off skipping them and focusing more on the long day (and coming into it more fresh).

_____________________________________________________

Yeah, good look with those jalepenos Adan. Hell, throw in some chorizo and hot links while your at it. I'm not running behind you...and make sure to add some TP to your pack.

Art ...
(asandh) - F
R2R2R on 02/05/2012 21:09:11 MST Print View

...

Edited by asandh on 02/13/2012 20:58:25 MST.

Adan Lopez
(Lopez) - F

Locale: San Gabriel Valley
Big Horn Ridge today on 02/05/2012 21:55:51 MST Print View

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Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
pics on 02/06/2012 07:19:22 MST Print View

nice pics, looks like a great place to run :)

ben wood
(benwood)

Locale: flatlands of MO
Re: Big Horn Ridge today on 02/06/2012 08:47:17 MST Print View

craig, that hydration pack is so NOT punk rock.

what happened?!

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
Re: Big Horn Ridge today on 02/06/2012 09:54:41 MST Print View

Loving these photographs from the runs fellas, thanks for the continued stoke.

So can we expect to see your snaggled toothed four legged companion Craig? I want to see his training log. Probably my favorite photo from this run is of Adan and mighty dog- Craig's dog is looking at Adan's size 14 feet saying to himself, "Damnnnnnn! Those are some big as$ feet boy!"

9 weeks and counting!

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Re: Big Horn Ridge today on 02/06/2012 09:59:54 MST Print View

That there is Adan's dog, Max. Max is a bad little man, navigates ice and snow like a trooper.

My pup stayed home that day, should've brought her. But I will be making some commemorative R2R2R dog food bowls for both of them; mine is training at about 60% of my weekly mileage right now.

Adan Lopez
(Lopez) - F

Locale: San Gabriel Valley
Max on 02/06/2012 13:50:09 MST Print View

Max is short for Maximum. He chose the name himself. He likes to chase squirrels. He doesnt know this, but I can see him slowing down so that he doesnt actually catch the squirrel.

Craig I think, had an especially good time on this run because of me, but I suspect it was not my wit. I remember looking up from my uncomfortable position in a manzanita bush at Craig, who was doubled over laughing. I swore it was the new shoes and that i dont ever fall, but I'm not sure he heard me over all the laughing. That was my third such incident that day. The only one not bleeding was Max, good times.

Mike and Greg, glad to hear you guys are feeling good. I look forward to meeting everybody. I'm learning alot through these exchanges, thanks to Art and Eugene as well. I'm following alot of your advice re: nutrition and I think it's helping.

@Ben: I think Craig's moved on from the punk rock look, he has some other interesting ideas for running attire that i think involve fur.

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
Happiness is new shoes! on 02/08/2012 17:55:46 MST Print View

Every post on this forum seems to degrade into a war. So now a happy thought..... I had been wearing a fairly old pair of trail shoes on my road runs and it was time for a new pair of road shoes. So I bought a great pair of Brooks Ghosts and went to Kennesaw Mtn for a triple ascent of the mountain. Ten miles and 1600' later I am happy to report that I had the best run of my life. What a difference the shoes made. I was able to really cruise on even the steepest downhills due to the better padding. I even stuck my arms out like an airplane on a couple of the steep downhill sections, getting weird looks from the walkers. I was a very happy camper when I got back to work. The strange thing is that my legs are already getting a bit sore due to the fast pace. :)))))

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Happiness is new shoes! on 02/09/2012 21:44:43 MST Print View

Nice Greg.

"I even stuck my arms out like an airplane on a couple of the steep downhill sections, getting weird looks from the walkers."

I do the same thing when I'm getting inspired. That, or jumping off small bumps and trying to run on air. I especially enjoy yammering like a coyote.

I've been meaning to ask you about your blister/foot care routine Greg; a good topic to open for discussion here. I remember reading on your PCT journal that you found slitting them worked better than poking for drainage- I've never tried that. What else are you doing? My typical procedure is drain and leukotape, covering the loose skin of the blister with a little backwards tape or tissue first so it won't stick. I also cut the sharp corners off the leukotape to keep it from peeling. Any other tips? Did you use/carry any glue?

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
Blisters on 02/10/2012 06:06:09 MST Print View

After leaving he High Sierra I took five days off in Tahoe. My feet were shredded from the snow and I went to an urgent care because a couple of the blisters were infected. The doc slit the blisters and he told me it was much more effective in keeping them drained vs just poking alone. For the rest of the hike I would keep a bandaid covering the worst blister areas. I would personally lean toward bandaids over tape to keep the adhesive away from the actual blister.

I'm not doing anything now for blisters because I haven't had any during this training. One problem that I still have is hard spots almost like a cross between a callus and wart on the otside of my foot. This was extrememely painful on my trip. I have learned to manage this by literally shaving off layers to keep the thickness down.

I have more issues with blisters out west due to the dust. I learned the hard way (again) how important it is the keep the feet clean. Hopefully I don't relearn this on the R2R2R.

Adan Lopez
(Lopez) - F

Locale: San Gabriel Valley
Blisters on 02/10/2012 07:38:24 MST Print View

Greg,
By keeping your feet clean, do you mean wash them once or twice a day, or are you saying it's best to avoid letting dust into your shoes throughout the day?

Also, we're you using any lube when you had those blister issues?

Edited by Lopez on 02/10/2012 07:42:13 MST.

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
Clean feet on 02/10/2012 08:17:14 MST Print View

I took three pairs of Wrightsocks and would change them every hour or two. I did not use a lube since that will attract dust. I did use a special blend of medicated and non medicated foot powder that helped with dry lube and athletes foot. It also allowed the dirt to come off easier. This setup worked well for me and I plan on using this on the R2R2R.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
Re: Blisters on 02/10/2012 08:29:31 MST Print View

knock on wood I haven't had much of a problem w/ blisters, the few that I have had I've used a small piece of gauze and covered w/ Leukotape- I also round the edges to so it holds better, but I also use benzoin to make the adhesion even more robust

I have had very good luck w/ Hydropel in wet environs, but agree w/ Greg that for dry/dusty conditions it's not the best

Greg- what's you "secret" mix? also are you bringing multiple pairs of socks, I was thinking about throwing in one spare pair

Mike

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
Re: Re: Blisters on 02/10/2012 09:16:57 MST Print View

Mike,
I would have love to have Hydropel for my time in the snow. My feet were wet for over a month solid and I think Hydropel would have helped.

I will either take two or three pairs (total), they weigh very little. My powder mix was a combination of regular foot powder, Gold Bond medicated foot powder and a lesser amount of Miconazole Nitrate 2% powder. I used pounds of this total on my trip and this seemed to be the best combination of performance and price.

Edited by gg-man on 02/10/2012 09:21:56 MST.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Foot care on 02/10/2012 09:57:48 MST Print View

I've had better luck on 30-40 milers when I change my socks every 10 miles. 40 miles = one pair on my feet and 3 pairs in my pack. If not that, at least rotate with another pair every 10 miles and let the previously worn pair dry out and fluff up a bit.

If I'm only bringing one pair, then every 10 miles, I take them off during a break, turn them inside out, beat them on a rock to knock out the dust, reinvert, and put them back on the other foot.

I try to do this for all hikes but am religious about it for GCNP: Trim your toothnails A WEEK in advance. You don't want that newly exposed skin to then get hammered against your shoe for 21 miles of downhill.

I know a lot of runners wear "tennis-sock" length - just above the shoe. For dusty trails, I like a little more height so that more of the dust goes outside the sock instead of inside against my skin.

Art ...
(asandh) - F
Re: Foot care on 02/10/2012 10:08:53 MST Print View

boy you guys are dedicated to protecting your feet, and I applaud you for it.

Edited by asandh on 02/13/2012 20:50:53 MST.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Foot care on 02/10/2012 10:53:34 MST Print View

Nothing fancy for me on the R2R2R. I'll be carrying a little leukotape just in case. Beside that, I'll just switch socks and clean my feet off real quick at the North rim.

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
blisters on 02/10/2012 11:13:57 MST Print View

Sockless or not, blisters have not been an issue for my feet. (*knock on wood)

Shoes that have open mesh uppers with a wide/roomy toebox and snug midfoot/heel that doesn't force my toes into the front of the shoe has worked very well for me. Mesh uppers aren't ideal in keeping out fine sediment and sand from my trails, but they do a hell of a job in allowing my feet to remain dry.

I will be wearing whatever relatively clean socks I have at the time I load up my pack for the road. ;-)