Forum Index » Winter Hiking » Couple Winter Camping Questions


Display Avatars Sort By:
Joseph Wright
(hatchmaster) - F

Locale: The Rockies
Couple Winter Camping Questions on 11/15/2011 16:02:53 MST Print View

I am not new to winter camping but I have not done it 100% the best in the past. Most of my camping will be in Colorado with temps from 20f to below zero.

My new solo winter tent is a Black Diamond Hilight so I am sure that condensation will be an issue. My thought is to put my sleeping bag in my MSR e-bivy to keep my bag dry and to not worry about touching the inside of the tent (my exped downmat 9 almost pushes on the top and bottom of the tent so there will be contact). What are the pros/cons of doing this? I imagine my bag will not breathe as well with the bivy so will I have the same problem on the inside of the bivy as well? Or any general venting tips for the hilight in winter.

What about cold boots in the morning? I am not a fan of boots in my sleeping bag. For me it seems to take forever to clean them off to where I will allow them to sleep with me. I have been throwing a hand warmer in each boot with a sock onto of that in the morning. Any better ideas?

What about candle lanterns? Will this really help with condensation issues? Are they worth it?

I want to get a hanging kit for my jetboil because I like the idea of cooking in the tent as I have no vestibule (yet). I know all about the safety concerns about cooking in a tent. But melting all my water in a jetboil as appose to my whisperlite and big old pot seems like a patience lesson I don't want to learn. Thoughts?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Couple Winter Camping Questions on 11/15/2011 16:17:22 MST Print View

"What about cold boots in the morning? I am not a fan of boots in my sleeping bag. For me it seems to take forever to clean them off to where I will allow them to sleep with me. I have been throwing a hand warmer in each boot with a sock onto of that in the morning. Any better ideas?"

I just covered this in another thread. When you get to camp, you set up your tent or shelter, and then you pull the sleeping bag out of its stuff sack to let it begin to fluff up. Then you turn the stuff sack inside-out. Once you remove your ski boots, you place them inside the stuff sack and place that inside the sleeping bag. Once you have slept overnight, you remove the warm ski boots and wear them. The stuff sack is turned outside-out and then the sleeping bag is stuffed in for storage.

--B.G.--

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Couple Winter Camping Questions on 11/15/2011 16:40:08 MST Print View

"What about cold boots in the morning?"

If your boots freeze over the night, make sure and open them up as much as possible first. When they're frozen and stiff it can be hard to get your feet into them.

Jim Colten
(jcolten)

Locale: MN
Re: Couple Winter Camping Questions on 11/15/2011 16:52:55 MST Print View

If you brought down booties and over boots then you can thaw frozen boots over a pot of steaming oatmeal.

Please don't ask how I know that:-)

Jim Colten
(jcolten)

Locale: MN
Re: Couple Winter Camping Questions on 11/15/2011 16:56:03 MST Print View

What about candle lanterns? Will this really help with condensation issues? Are they worth it?

I don't know about condensation but if everyone in a group brings 2 candle lanterns and hangs them around the group area in your camp it really helps cheer up the area after dark and before sleep time.

David Lutz
(davidlutz)

Locale: Bay Area
Boots on a Winter morning.... on 11/15/2011 17:05:47 MST Print View

I carry two Nalgene 16 ounce hard-sided bottles for hot water, one in each boot.

Richard Fischel
(RICKO) - F
*so I am sure that condensation will be an issue.* on 11/16/2011 08:23:22 MST Print View

why are you sure condensation will be an issue. i have the lighthouse, which is the big brother to the hilight. leaving the vent and door open a couple of inches i've never had an issue with condensation even with two big guys in the tent. solo, it should be less of a problem. will it be a little colder in the tent with the vents open, sure, but not so much colder that it isn't worth it. the awning does a great job of keeping rain/snow from getting in the open vents and keeping drips out when you go in and out of the tent. if you are solo, sleep on the diagonal and you shouldn't have an issue hitting the ends of the tent even with a long expidition bag. if i think there's going to be an issue, i put my shell between my sleeping bag and the tent on one end and my pack at the other. with my with my western mountaineering microfiber bag, i haven't had a problem with water penetration when its been in contact with the tent wall. i own an eVent overbag and have never found the need to use it in the tent for protection agains moisture.

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
Wintertrekking.com on 11/17/2011 08:13:48 MST Print View

Meant more for base camp type activities...but Wintertrekking.com is an awesome site for winter related outdoor activities.

The wool and leather is a bit of a throwback, but these guys know how be warm and comfortable in the Canadian winter. Think it gets cold there on occasion? :)


Good reading in any case. The basics can be applied to a lighter system.

Edited by PaulMags on 11/17/2011 08:16:43 MST.

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
open the tent up on 11/17/2011 11:30:23 MST Print View

I've had my Hilight for three seasons now. Still have issues with condensation/frost. Best is to open it up as much as you feel comfortable doing and depending on weather. I don't have a bivy, just a good bag and usually when winter/snow camping, stay one night, so no issue if something does get wet. The frost can be shook out in the AM before packing the tent up.
Duane

PS, using a white gas stove will be cheaper and more efficient than the Jetboil, although I was really impressed on how fast the JB boils water.

Edited by hikerduane on 11/17/2011 11:32:24 MST.

David Olsen
(oware)

Locale: Steptoe Butte
winter camping on 11/17/2011 12:08:39 MST Print View

Make sure you have enough food, fuel and insulation to make up for any mistakes or
problems.

Vapor Barrier liners help for both daytime use in boots and night time use in sleeping bags to reduce condensation forming in your insulation layers.

+1 on the pint bottles for hot water bottles in the boots in the morning.

If you don't want your boots inside your bag, tie the laces together and put them
under your knees, outside the sleeping bag but on top of your pad with the soles facing
to the sides. Keeps the boots from freezing and helps keep you from rolling off your pad.