Forum Index » Multiple Use Gear » Who does not love a cigar in the woods?


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Chase Norton
(Micronorton) - F
Who does not love a cigar in the woods...as long as you are a cigar smoker and have a 2 miles radius of isolation on 11/15/2011 02:34:49 MST Print View

cigar
weight

This idea came to me after I enjoyed a nice cigar and a homeless man asked if he could have the case because "they are great to use!" Pondering on what he meant, I thought of the possibilities. It has a screw on top, a thin wood lining on the inside (can be removed) and felt pretty lightweight. I submerged it in my sink for 30sec, unscrewed it and the wood lining was 100% dry. Throwing it on my scale it weighed in at 8.6grams. Removing the wood lining, it came in at 7.2g. What will I use this for? Along the trails in Hawaii there are various berries, namely the Ohelo berry. Problem always is they get crushed when you try to collect them, but not anymore. When it is full, start seriously munching.

All this berry collecting will of course be after I enjoy the cigar somewhere along the trail.

I am sure there are many other uses.

Map storage since it is water proof
Lightweight Flask (151 needed of course)
Bug collector to eat later
Just tested out the sharpness of the cap when unscrewed and can cut cooked meat
I feel like I am stretching with a trowel.
Hell, just as an easy organizer for first aid/hygiene/fire starter.

At 0.25oz, for the case, and 0.52g with a cigar, it will be in my pack next trip!

Edited by Micronorton on 02/10/2012 13:42:27 MST.

Nick Larsen
(stingray4540) - F

Locale: South Bay
Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 01/07/2012 16:31:02 MST Print View

Mmm... A trail cigar! Probably a lot lighter than my pipe and everything associated.
Who cares about the case! Not a cigar guy though. Got any recomendations?
Ok, the case seems like it has some value. A lot lighter than unshaped coke bottles.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 01/07/2012 23:47:53 MST Print View

>"Who does not love a cigar in the woods?"

Monica Lewinsky?

Hillary?

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 01/08/2012 08:52:52 MST Print View

Right into chaff. Good job David.

So what are you going to use the container for?

Edited by kthompson on 01/08/2012 09:21:30 MST.

Jay Wilkerson
(Creachen) - MLife

Locale: East Bay
Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 01/08/2012 09:02:56 MST Print View

Titanium tent stakes might fit in the container?

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 01/08/2012 15:36:09 MST Print View

Who does not love a cigar in the woods ?,/b>
I would say most... in fact if you lit a cigar next to me, I would walk away.
However "most" would probably just put up with it...

Anyway, it looks like a 7" type , but I do have 5" Ti nail stakes that 4 could likely fit in there.
Franco

Edited by Franco on 01/08/2012 15:36:41 MST.

Eugene Hollingsworth
(GeneH_BPL) - F
Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 01/27/2012 00:48:54 MST Print View

Use the tube to share your Scotch while enjoying the cigar with friends. :-)

Keith Bassett
(keith_bassett)

Locale: Pacific NW
make a stove w/ the tube on 01/27/2012 21:45:59 MST Print View

http://microlightwings.com/blog/don-diego-ultralight-alcohol-stove.html

Make one of these bad boys after properly disposing of the cigar. :-)

Bob Shaver
(rshaver) - F

Locale: West
no thanks on 01/30/2012 09:58:31 MST Print View

A cigar in the woods is about as appealing to me as ice cold water poured down my back. No thanks, and please don't smoke around me. Smokers don't realize that their sense of smell is shot, and their clothes, breath and hair have absorbed the odor of stale smoke, which they can't smell but everyone else can.

Eddy Walker
(Ewker) - M

Locale: southeast
Re: no thanks on 01/30/2012 10:03:28 MST Print View

popcorn, get your popcorn ;)

Edited by Ewker on 01/30/2012 10:04:04 MST.

Chase Norton
(Micronorton) - F
oh my on 01/30/2012 15:30:34 MST Print View

My most sincere and heartfelt apologies to everyone who reads subjects without a care to the message content. Clearly, next time a more appropriate subject would be "A 7.2g waterproof metal tube with endless applications". This way nonsmoker's blood pressure would stay low enough for them to continue reading further and realize what I am actually trying to discuss. Again, my bad.

j lan
(justaddfuel) - F

Locale: MN
Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 01/30/2012 15:35:44 MST Print View

I find it pretty hilarious when car drivers complain about people smoking. You are pumping 10 times the amount of these toxins into my lungs while I am on my bike. But anti-smoking militancy is the cause de-jour among the population right now.

Sweet tube.

Phillip Colelli
(pdcolelli42)

Locale: AT, follow@ www.thruperspective.com
Really? on 02/09/2012 20:32:58 MST Print View

I understand the fear of second hand smoke and what not... but seriously I bet my BO will smell more than a single cigar out on the trail.

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 02/10/2012 00:23:10 MST Print View

But anti-smoking militancy is the cause de-jour among the population right now.

Hmm, that is how you, personally, feel about it. I don't like smoke... the smell, the way it hurts my eyes and gives me a headache, the way it makes everything I am wearing smell like smoke, the unhealthiness of it, the fact that when I tell someone to please not blow the smoke in my direction so often makes them take offense... It's very simple; I don't like it. And many, many other people don't either. I don't see why they have to put up with it, especially for something so totally unnecessary and mobile. If someone was Farting a lot around you would you simply accept it and say it was okay? And it is not a "cause du-jour". I've felt this way for 40 years now. So has everyone else I know who has never liked smoking.

I have nothing against people smoking if they want to... just don't do it where I have to participate in it, or, better yet, wear a glass helmet and you can smoke inside there to your heart's content.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: west coast best coast
Re: Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 02/10/2012 00:28:50 MST Print View

The woods are not a crowded hotel lobby. I'm not sure why people are complaining that they don't like being around people smoking in a thread about being in remote wilderness.
I think a cigar would be nice in the woods. I don't think it's gross at all.

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 02/10/2012 00:33:19 MST Print View

On that point, Justin, I will concede, as long as it's not in a camp close to someone who is smoking a cigar... which puts out a lot of smoke.

You probably don't know, though, that by living in Japan I am very badly subjected to awful amounts of smoke everywhere I go. Only recently has smoking been banned on trains, train platforms, and public lobbies. But most restaurants and coffee shops and other gathering places are still very much clogged with smoke. And this being Japan, you can't say anything about it. So I get pretty frustrated when I get out to the wilderness and in the crowded campsites there (you often don't have the option of camping elsewhere... it is often illegal), have to put up with the camper not 2 meters away smoking.

Edited by butuki on 02/10/2012 00:38:59 MST.

Phillip Colelli
(pdcolelli42)

Locale: AT, follow@ www.thruperspective.com
Re: Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 02/10/2012 06:31:38 MST Print View

I myself don't smoke cigarettes, but I'd enjoy a cigar and what not occasionally. The smoke from cigarettes can be bothersome even to me if someone is close enough. I never really gave much thought that smokers may take offense if you asked them not to smoke around you. I think it's totally acceptable to make that request.

I like to do whatever I want and I'd assume everyone else likes to do what they want as well but I suppose we must not do so at the expense of others.

Chase Norton
(Micronorton) - F
People! on 02/10/2012 13:40:33 MST Print View

We are all avid lovers of the outdoors. Why are you going on about how much you hate smoking and the smell and on and on? Yes, many people don't smoke and many people don't like the smell of smoke. Got it. Not new. I will never be around you when I enjoy my cigar mainly because I hike solo and in regions where no one else can be found for miles. Yes, that person is being inconsiderate for smoking next to you at a camp site, but jesus, that is not what this thread is about. I've changed the title to remove confusion and reduce the snap of anger that it seemed to create.

Ben Whitsett
(BenWhitsett) - F
re on 02/15/2012 15:30:34 MST Print View

I hate cigarette smoke too!!!!


LMAO Just kidding!!!

I'm all in for the cigar after a nice long day of hiking!

Peter Treiber
(peterbt) - M

Locale: A^2
"Who does not love a cigar in the woods?" on 02/15/2012 21:30:24 MST Print View

I can't quite figure out from this story whether the OP let the homeless guy have the case...

Nick E.
(trAletrasch) - F

Locale: PNW
simple. on 02/20/2012 03:27:19 MST Print View

These Guys did the PCT last year and frankly, a couple of them smoke like chimneys.
I've never understood smoking and hiking (or biking for that matter) even though i have friends who pedal more miles on theyre metal steeds as courriers downtown than i'll ever do recreationally, all the while puffin' down a pack per diem. that just doesnt work for me. bottom line if they arent blowin it in your face and you let them know it bothers you (given they're being respectful as can be), all you can really do is mind your own and don't condone it...we dont need our peers killing themselves:/ its an unfortunate addiction.
Cigars? Cigarettes? No Thanks.
Now last season's PCT thru-hikers were smoking something entirely different, that which i have no quams of it being smoked in our backcountry. perhaps people flamed up on this subject should try smoking a bit more of that on the trail, eh?

David Maxwell
(DavidMaxwell) - F

Locale: eastern, tn
It's A Girl on 02/20/2012 07:25:40 MST Print View

I'll be passing out "Its A Girl" cigars on wednesday morning!!! Hopefully the first stop on the way home from the hospital is the AT. I want to get a good picture by a blaze for her.

eric lansford
(PapaSherpa)

Locale: PNW
Love a cigar on 02/20/2012 08:06:30 MST Print View

I love a cigar at the end of the day. Sitting by the campfire (down-wind of everyone) and light up - cigar in one hand - small amount of whiskey in the other.... wonderful conclusion to a day on the trail.

Matthew Perry
(bigfoot2) - F

Locale: Oregon
Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 02/20/2012 13:19:24 MST Print View

Not me, but my buddy does. Trail name: BIG TOBACCO.
boss

Steven Hanlon
(asciibaron) - F

Locale: Mid Atlantic
cigar tubes on 03/16/2012 06:26:35 MDT Print View

the only use i have found for the tubes is in model railroading to make a refinery... i wouldn't put food in them. i'm moving away from cigars over to pipe tobacco. much less waste and a much different smoking experience.

now i just need to find an ultralight comfy chair

Edited by asciibaron on 03/16/2012 06:28:42 MDT.

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 03/29/2012 20:50:18 MDT Print View

Black Bears and Grizzlies hate them.

Tom Clark
(TomClark) - MLife

Locale: East Coast
Re: Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 03/29/2012 21:16:12 MDT Print View

I agree...cigar & cigarette smoke stinks. Why go to the woods to smell that when you could go to a bus stop? You say no one is around, but the person hiking up 10 minutes after you still smells it, and you won't/can't do anything about it.

As Miguel says, would you tolerate people purposely stiking the air around you, or for that fact...yelling in your face? I doubt it, so why would I want you to stink up a huge area of the outdoors that I'm trying to enjoy without spoiling?

If no one is around, then how can I complain, but do you always have control over that?

Chris Scala
(Scalawag) - F
Smoking on 05/04/2012 14:34:05 MDT Print View

If someone is doing their best to be considerate, let them enjoy the woods as they please. Frankly, if I happened upon someone having a pipe atop a mountain, clearly enjoying himself, it would be rude of ME to be a total jerk about it. Maybe that man is having the best day of his life? Am I really going to crap all over it by saying, "Excuse me, I know the view is gorgeous, but could you please leave?" God, no.

Smoking and the outdoors goes hand in hand, and has since before everyone decided to be involved in each other's business. Live and let live. If the faint smell bothers you that bad, I'm curious what kind of resolve your fragile self must have to be hiking all those miles.

In other words, if there is no one around to the best of my knowledge, I refuse to worry about any "potential passerby's". That is just insane, and silly. I think it shows a great sense of entitlement to say, "Well, I DON'T like it, so YOU can't!"

Edited by Scalawag on 05/04/2012 14:35:00 MDT.

Daniel Allen
(Dan_Quixote) - F

Locale: below the mountains (AK)
Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods...as long as you are a cigar smoker and have a 2 miles radius of isolation on 05/04/2012 14:48:33 MDT Print View

Ents & Huorns?

;)

Keith Bassett
(keith_bassett)

Locale: Pacific NW
Re: Re: Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 05/04/2012 16:28:36 MDT Print View

>why would I want you to stink up a huge area of the outdoors that I'm trying to enjoy >without spoiling?

I agree that a lack of consideration is rude.

However, unless you hold ownership of an area or you are protesting an illegal or extremely intrusive activity - we live in a society that values individual freedoms.

If someone sits next to you and blows smoke in your face, by all means complain. If someone is hiking directly in front of you smoking, ask if you can pass. But 10 minutes ahead of you is still unacceptable? That seems somewhat extreme.

On the other hand, if I am right next to you in a confined area and I light up my cigar and blow in your direction... Then I am being rude. Confined spaces are no place for smoke, whether they are a train car or a very small campsite.

I guess my point is moderation from smokers who want to enjoy a cigar, and moderation from those who want no part of it. Try not to infringe on other people's freedoms, just because you find them distasteful.

The pendulum has swung pretty extremely to the anti-tobacco side, but that doesn't justify outrage at non-aggressive behaviors.

Can't we all get along? :)

Arapiles .
(Arapiles) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Re: oh my on 05/05/2012 00:14:12 MDT Print View

"My most sincere and heartfelt apologies to everyone who reads subjects without a care to the message content. Clearly, next time a more appropriate subject would be "A 7.2g waterproof metal tube with endless applications". This way nonsmoker's blood pressure would stay low enough for them to continue reading further and realize what I am actually trying to discuss. Again, my bad."

In other words it was a troll. You might as well have posted about dogs on trails or guns. Are you so surprised by the response you got?

And by the way, tobacco smoke - particularly cigar smoke - is very noticeable in the outdoors, even well after the smoker has passed.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Cigars in the WOODS?? on 05/23/2012 23:23:19 MDT Print View

Arrrggggghhhh!

I go to the woods to smell nature, not a cigar. But if'n yer a smoker ya got little sense of smell left I guess.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Cigars in the WOODS?? on 05/24/2012 00:53:04 MDT Print View

In the news yesterday, from large long-term survey:
People who got second-hand smoke as babies are turning out to have medical problems at middle-age.

One day, tobacco company execs may get indicted.

Cheers

Jason Picard
(jasonpicard) - F
Cigars in the woods on 05/24/2012 06:22:05 MDT Print View

Cigars are great. So is scotch. I enjoy cigars sparingly and only around those who aren't bothered by it. I check first. Seems simple enough.

Chris Scala
(Scalawag) - F
Freedom on 05/24/2012 18:14:07 MDT Print View

I'll reiterate how I feel on this.

Regardless of YOUR personal stance on tobacco, tobacco and the wilderness have gone hand in hand... forever. It is not "disrespectful" to smoke tobacco outside. It is nowhere near the same thing as littering, or crushing vegetation in a camp site, or chopping live wood, or anything like that. I believe we as US citizens have a right to choose our vices, so long as we are only impacting ourselves with that decision.

I also believe, that MUTUAL respect is a strong virtue. So, if my favorite thing to do in the woods is have a cigar, you gotta respect that's what I decide to do. At the same time, knowing that cigars are indeed smoky things, I have to respect you by DOING MY BEST to make sure I'm not sending smoke in anyone's direction. That means, I have the intent of respect, but should you sneak up on me, or I am unaware of your presence, then I can't be responsible for that, but I would gladly move if I suddenly notice a father and son coming up the trail to the spot I'm at.

It's easy. Everyone just needs to relax a little. We have so little "open backcountry" left in the US, let's all share it and allow for personal freedom.

Because once you start saying, "It is rude if I have to smell your smoke.", you might as well say:

- No stinky Tuna dinners. I hate Tuna, so don't eat it.
- No nude bathing. I didn't come to the woods to see a nude man.
- Bear Horn? I don't want to hear that echoing in a Valley. Deal with those bears silently.
- I don't want to sit on a mountain top next to a guy with BO. Wash yourself before you choose to sit next to me.
- I hate the smell of Scotch, please take your flask down the trail.
- That lime green wind shirt nauseates me, please take it off in my presence.
- The smell of coffee irritates my bowels, please don't drink it near me.
- Don't pass gas up the trail from me, it is smelly and gross.

etc. It's a downward spiral of silly, self-entitled absurdity. It's one thing to be subjected to direct, harsh, second-hand smoke (I can't imagine a situation outdoors where this would happen)... it's another to complain of a faint odor in the air.

Oh and FWIW – I'm sure far more second-hand smoke is inhaled tending a campfire from 6 inches away than being on the same trail as a guy smoking a quarter mile away from you.

Edited by Scalawag on 05/24/2012 18:16:41 MDT.

Steven Clark
(sclark58) - MLife

Locale: Costa Rica
M&Ms Anyone? on 05/30/2012 16:47:17 MDT Print View

I use the M&M candy tubes with a flip top to store small items. You can wrap tape, fishing line, or wire around the outside for repair kit or fish kit. No smoke!

jacko vanderbijl
(jacko1956)

Locale: Shelley Western Australia
Common sense please... on 06/09/2012 23:06:03 MDT Print View

As a lifetime nonsmoker who's parents both died of lung cancer my position on smoking is self evident.
However I am not the fun police.
If smoking is your deal then I expect if our paths cross we have a potential for conflict. I am sure that hiking the AT in 2013 it is something that is going to annoy me a lot. A recent thread on Whiteblaze discusses this in detail.
But just like when I break wind (frequently), some common courtesy reduces any issues.
There is generally an upwind side of any seating area and it makes sense to smoke downwind. Confined spaces that are shared should be respected. Leave no trace still applies.
Shelters on my local track are technically smoking banned but generally people get along.
I would think that smoking in a high tech (and expensive) tent and/or sleeping bag a potential for disaster anyway.
I expect that I will be spending more time in my tent than I would otherwise because of smokers but I'll live with it if the weight of numbers cause that. I would hope that when weather conditions etc necessitate crowding, smokers show more restraint.
But for the rest of the time let's just stay cool people. It's a big world out there.
Besides, if I relax my courtesies on my wind, I guarantee I win! :-)

Arlan Beeck
(highpeakdrifter)
A Woman Is Just a Woman.... on 06/10/2012 00:42:00 MDT Print View

"For Maggie has written a letter to give me my choice between
The wee little whimpering Love and the great god Nick o' Teen.

A million surplus Maggies are willing to bear the yoke;
And a woman is only a woman, but a good Cigar is a Smoke.

Light me another Cuba -- I hold to my first-sworn vows.
If Maggie will have no rival, I'll have no Maggie for Spouse!"

- Rudyard Kipling

Jason Amick
(isneer) - F
Re on 06/11/2012 04:59:05 MDT Print View

I am loving it but with great care.

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
"Who does not love a cigar in the woods?" on 06/11/2012 09:49:22 MDT Print View

There a few here who could afford to light up some grass and take a hit, mellow out somewhere alongside a brook and just sit. Okay, the grass isn't necessary, just saying....

Of all the things to get worked up about, on both sides. Why fight such small battles? Why even make it a battle?

It seems people here want what they want and don't like seeing others live a lifestyle that differs from their standards of living in this world. I make efforts to stay reasonably healthy, and daily see people make efforts to shorten their life by consuming fastfood until their feet swell up- should I cry foul at their choices? No, I live with it and move on, life is far too short and passing to waste energy managing the choices of others, even if those choices occasionally interrupt my hike along the trail or whatever perceptions of quality I feel I'm due while hiking outdoors. This is all starting to sound like a first world, priviledged, "problem" if you ask me.

A few solutions to avoiding tobacco smoke on the trail:

#1. Hike faster and harder. Pass them and go about your way happily. You're body will thank you ten fold.

#2. Hike offseason. Break out of the notion of "ideal" hiking times and go early spring, late fall, or winter when trail use is drastically reduced.

#3. Relocate. I have run into smoke on one occasion living in remote NM, and that happened to be a backpacking buddy who liked to partake in a little ganja while in the backcountry. I passed him and met up with him later. Easily avoidable. The AT corridor is a cluster F of shelters, well trodden trail networks, and prolific city traffic and roads, to expect people to not light up on trail is borderline delusional.

#4. Hike off trail. Get off the easy stuff and do some exploration.

#5. Acknowledge that you can't avoid the lifestyle choices of other individuals sometimes. Obesity burns my eyes, it messes with my selfish sensibilities, yet I am subject to seeing it daily. Do I bit$h about it? Nah, not worth it.

Daniel Goldenberg
(dag4643) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwet
Re: simple. on 06/11/2012 10:23:02 MDT Print View

"These Guys did the PCT last year and frankly, a couple of them smoke like chimneys.
I've never understood smoking and hiking (or biking for that matter)
"

Cycling and smoking have a long tradition:
smokers

And I agree with Eugene.

You'll be a lot happier in life if you don't sweat the little stuff.

Edited by dag4643 on 06/11/2012 10:27:28 MDT.

Chris Scala
(Scalawag) - F
Eugene on 06/13/2012 08:11:39 MDT Print View

I think you and I would get along, Eugene. It is definitely a waste of energy to let someone else's choices affect you that much, especially in the back country. Adaptability of mind and body are important if you aim to truly be at peace in the outdoors... and that includes tolerating other lifestyles.

Kevin Smith
(OddDuck)
Urine on 11/09/2012 17:05:41 MST Print View

Urine and the back country have gone together forever too. Can I walk up and p!ss on your leg while you're smoking a cigar? May $hit in your shoe?

I mean seriously. You complain that people are infringing on your 'right' to smoke in the back country, but when some opines that your smoke impinges on their right to enjoy some pristine mountain air, as pristine as it gets these days anyway, you get all holier then thou.

Pot. Meet kettle.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Urine on 11/09/2012 17:50:14 MST Print View

Ah, come on. We all need to get together. We are a team here. Team work!

Here is an example of real team work.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tSyV5e8nyGY

Nick Larsen
(stingray4540) - F

Locale: South Bay
Re: Urine on 02/13/2013 13:53:45 MST Print View

"Urine and the back country have gone together forever too. Can I walk up and p!ss on your leg while you're smoking a cigar? May $hit in your shoe?" - Kevin smith

Sorry, but your analogy is invalid. A better analogy would be me doing my best to go off trail and out of sight to take a wiz, but am unknowingly in view of another section of trail, and am unaware of your approach. Then you proceed to throw a hissy fit because you didn't come to the woods to see a guy with his junk hanging out.

The only way your analogy is valid is if someone sat next to you on the side of the trail, lit up and blew smoke in your face. I think even smokers would agree that is out of line and is not likely to happen.

If you don't like the smoke then pass them or move somewhere else. If 2 minutes of residual smoke smell is going to ruin 3 days in the wilderness, then you have some issues that can only be cured by a conversation on a couch...

Chris Scala wrote a great post on the last page, btw. Worth reading.

Edited by stingray4540 on 02/13/2013 13:55:45 MST.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods...as long as you are a cigar smoker and have a 2 miles radius of isolation on 02/26/2013 20:49:43 MST Print View

It may be a little narrow but the cigar tube may work out as a pocket fishing kit. Probably would need to keep the tackle to a bare minimum.

Edit: Chase, if you'll bring the Cohibas and I'll bring the Midleton.

Edited by IDBLOOM on 02/26/2013 20:52:39 MST.

Jason Hung
(moma-moma) - F - M

Locale: store.picharpak.com
as a stove! on 02/27/2013 10:46:22 MST Print View

you can put carbon felt into the tube soak with alcohol.
It also can be a adjustable stove by adjusting the felt how far it stick out of the tube!!

I love cigar too!

Daniel Collins
(Diablo-V) - F

Locale: Orlando FL
re: cigars on 09/01/2013 21:44:58 MDT Print View

I couldn't read through the whole post but I will continue my 2 cigars per day habit while hiking.

For the needy, I have a HUGE assortment of cuban cigar tubos including a bunch of the RyJ #3s shown by the OP.
If you are lucky I will send you a Partagas or Hoyo tubo.
State your Vitola (size)needed, drop me a PM.
This offer is only available to those who respect my right to enjoy my cigar in the woods after a long hike.
The only issue taking cigars is the special lighter needed but I will just make due with a bic.
EDIT : OK I read the whole thing. I don't blow smoke on other people. Simply because you can detect the smell of cigar from a distance does not mean I have infringed upon your enjoyment. It is the smell of naturally cured, additive and chemical free leaves smoldering, no more or less. If you don't like the residual smell of it on my clothing then stop sniffing me. I exercise my freedom to enjoy a cigar outdoors and try to balance it with respect for others as much as is practical, but it is MY trail too.

Now stop the petty nitpicking and lets think up a use for these tubes for cryin out loud.

The wood inside the tube is Spanish Cedar BTW, used to balance the humidity level in the tube, and to impart a little cedar essence to the cigar. It is a 200 year old practice with cigar storage.

Edited by Diablo-V on 09/02/2013 06:18:53 MDT.

F. R.
(fugitiveride) - F

Locale: Syldavia
cigars on 09/02/2013 22:51:56 MDT Print View

I do not like them here or there, I do not like them anywhere.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: cigars on 09/02/2013 23:04:10 MDT Print View

But what to do with those tubes? Is there nothing to be done with them? Can we shove them where needed?

The cigar box is more useful I think.

Daniel Collins
(Diablo-V) - F

Locale: Orlando FL
tubos on 09/03/2013 07:04:07 MDT Print View

The tubes (tubos in spanish)come in a myriad of sizes, but most have a press fit
end cap with no seal except metal to metal, so they would not be absolutely waterproof.
The screw top tubes shown in the first post come with some Romeo y Julieta cigars from Cuba in two main sizes, both about 3/4 inch diameter - 4 and 7/8 long (Romeo #3)and 5 and 1/8 long (Romeo #2).
They both weigh 7 grams each regardless of length since my scale will not register 1/2 gram. Both tubes will hold waterproof matches stacked in two bundles one on top of the other, and are lighter that commercial waterproof match cases. The lid gaskets are real thin poly foam sheet so they will not rot.

Uses ?
Match case for one.
I am thinking of making my dryer lint firestarter wrapped around a thin piece of wire.
The case is filled with the firestarter with the wire in the middle. You pull on the wire to get the firestarter to the top where you can peel off a small piece at a time.
Simple and no plastic bags or litter involved.
The tubes are lighter than any small bottles for spices, sugar, salt,drink mixes, medications, or whatever you want to keep dry. The tubes will hold rolled up pieces of silnylon or cuben fiber repair tape in a case lighter than the commercial case, along with any glue tubes. The tubes will hold sewing or fishing kits along with a mini swiss army knife.
The fatter tubes will hold a 5 day supply of blue shop towel toilet paper or a complete mosquito head net.
Use your imagination.

peter vacco
(fluff@inreach.com) - M

Locale: no. california
Re: tubos on 09/03/2013 13:17:59 MDT Print View

tubed cubans make appropriate gifts of appreciation all across the north. they weigh very little, and are not something that occures in villages by random accident. i normally toss several in the pack for just such a situation that i need to say Thank You, money would be crass (even for me ! ), and handing out a mosquito net isn't going to cut it.

am finding the effete repulsion of outdoor smoke odor pretty ridiculous amongst a group of people familiar with say ... campfires.

i have smoked one cigar in my entire existence. t'was in the middle of BC, nearly out of food, had left 1" of rum, and this world-rocking stogie to deal with.
started in on the last of my rum, lit the cuban, and 15 minutes later, am dancing naked (it's raining) around outside the tent resetting pegs.
and THAT was a pretty good afternoon.

no telling what the heck to use the tubes for. not like it's something valuable like a film can.

cheers,
v.

Daniel Collins
(Diablo-V) - F

Locale: Orlando FL
watrproof on 09/04/2013 05:37:34 MDT Print View

I selected three different larger tubes with the press on dome style cap and tossed them in my pool.
24 hours and none leaked, so I will consider them all waterproof.
The larger ones now open a slew of possibilities.
About 1 inch dia by 6 inches long.

M Blick
(mattblick) - F

Locale: Ohio
Courtesy Nazis on 01/15/2014 11:59:33 MST Print View

I keep my stogies in an OPsack, and typically go through 3-4 cigars a day on backpacking trips. When in civilization, its one or two a week. Cigars in and of themselves, (without the tubo) are multi use. Besides the great satisfaction they provide me in the great outdoors they are extremely affective at chasing away insects, the egocentric, and the self-righteous.

For the masses extolling the evils of getting a whiff of tobacco scent, do you also complain about the scent of campfire smoke? Do you forgo the evening fire to avoid inflicting the smell upon others?

The Environmental Protection Administration estimates that wood smoke is 12 times more carcinogenic than equal amounts of tobacco smoke, and that it stays active in the body up to 40 times longer than tobacco smoke. I.E. One hour smelling wood smoke is worse for your health than 12 hours smelling tobacco smoke. You sit upwind of all of your fires? Smell your campfire clothes and tell me you aren't breathing it in.

To the tobacco complainers:
Don't have a campfire, the smoke will horribly irritate my eyes and endanger my health. I have the right not to catch a whiff of your campfire's smoke in an 800 square mile park. I don't want your enjoyment of a campfire to negatively impact my personal experience or endanger my health."

Edited by mattblick on 01/15/2014 12:10:51 MST.

Billy Ray
(rosyfinch) - M

Locale: the mountains
Re: Courtesy Nazis on 01/15/2014 13:01:59 MST Print View

"For the masses extolling the evils of getting a whiff of tobacco scent, do you also complain about the scent of campfire smoke? Do you forgo the evening fire to avoid inflicting the smell upon others? "

Answers: Yes, and Yes.

Alright, then. It's a deal... you won't smoke out there and I won't have fires.

Billy

Billy Ray
(rosyfinch) - M

Locale: the mountains
Re: Re: Courtesy Nazis on 01/15/2014 13:04:28 MST Print View

BTW... haven't had a fire in 30 years or so.

Perhaps I am deluded, but I expect there are others that feel the same.

Billy

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Courtesy Nazis on 01/15/2014 13:14:50 MST Print View

"For the masses extolling the evils of getting a whiff of tobacco scent, do you also complain about the scent of campfire smoke? Do you forgo the evening fire to avoid inflicting the smell upon others? "

I absolutely do! On the other hand I don't mind if any of it is far enough from me.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Re: Courtesy Nazis on 01/15/2014 14:01:14 MST Print View

6th post on this site and he invokes Nazis. Good start.

Paul Andronico
(Jakesandwich) - M

Locale: S.F. Bay Area
Analogy on 01/15/2014 15:34:36 MST Print View

You are hiking peacefully through the woods and you start to hear some music that is offensive to you (metal, country western, pop, techno, or whatever you hate), and as you keep walking it gets louder and louder. Up the trail you find someone hiking with a boom box listening to their favorite music at a level that can be heard in a pretty wide radius. Illegal? Nope. Annoying? Yes. I probably wouldn't say anything and try and get away from them to return to the peace of the outdoors. Same approach with a cigar smoker. Unless the smoker was self-righteous about it, in which case I might hike with them while legally blasting heavy metal on my boom box :) (And no, I don't really have a boom box.)

Mitchell Ebbott
(mebbott) - F - M

Locale: SoCal
Re: Re: Re: Courtesy Nazis on 01/15/2014 16:43:55 MST Print View

> 6th post on this site and he invokes Nazis. Good start.

In accordance with Godwin's Law, I now declare this thread over.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Re: Re: Re: Courtesy N**** on 01/15/2014 16:48:32 MST Print View

Are we counting replys that mock that references, and only mention it in the subject line? ;-P

Edited by millonas on 01/15/2014 16:49:11 MST.

Billy Ray
(rosyfinch) - M

Locale: the mountains
Re: Analogy on 01/15/2014 18:34:51 MST Print View

" Up the trail you find someone hiking with a boom box listening to their favorite music at a level that can be heard in a pretty wide radius. Illegal? Nope."

Disturbing the peace is indeed against the law.

Enforcement is another issue.

Billy

Andy Stow
(AndyS) - F - M

Locale: Midwest USA
Re: Re: Analogy on 01/16/2014 07:27:39 MST Print View

"Disturbing the peace is indeed against the law."

Loud music is generally only considered disturbing the peace if they ignore requests to turn it down.

M Blick
(mattblick) - F

Locale: Ohio
Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 07:44:00 MST Print View

N&*^ reference was in poor taste; my apologies.

As noted, I have posted 6 times though I joined the community over 5 years ago. I generally lurk and soak up some valuable knowledge. I'll probably go back to stealth mode. Posted a few helpful hints in the gear section yesterday and then visited the multi-use section for the first time. I saw this thread and it struck a nerve.

@Paul:
While said boombox could be annoying, it also could be part of that person's outdoor experience. I am not going to suggest my outdoor experience is any more important than theirs on public land. Who knows, maybe I would find out I enjoy hiking to music. I have a little Bluetooth speaker I might try next time I am out. While not a boombox it would get loud enough to disturb others. I would mute it when aware that others were in my vicinity, just as I avoid drawing on my cigar when passing/being passed. Courtesy is important in the commons, but I will not humor or cater to prima donnas.

Kayakers and tubers often disturb areas where I am fly fishing. I once walked 3 miles searching for a brown and had spotted a biggun. I slowly crept up to the spot, staying low, downstream, and watching my shadow. Before my first cast, it was spooked by kids on tubes. A brown that big got so by being cautious; it would likely stay in hiding not eat again that day. My potential for completing a "slam" of a Brookie, Bow, and Brown went unfulfilled that day. This was very annoying, and much more difficult to remedy than simply walking slower or faster on a trail. My personal experience on the river was no more important than theirs. I am not going to suggest that they should forgo their enjoyment in "my space".

@Billy & @Mark: I am surprised you go without campfires. Sorry Billy, I won't be taking your deal. I didn't notice either of you suggesting that getting a whiff of cigar smoke is damaging to your health, should be done in a glass helmet, ruins the experience for somebody 10 miles down the trail, or comparing to hike-by leg p|ssings and/or boot sh|tt|ngs. These people could not see a thread about the reuse of a cigar tubo without interjecting their outdoor experience is more important than one whose experience includes enjoying a cigar.

out,
- M -

Edited by mattblick on 01/16/2014 09:28:28 MST.

spelt !
(spelt) - F

Locale: SW/C PA
hm on 01/16/2014 08:38:41 MST Print View

My dad used to smoke cigars around the campfire. Only time he ever smoked anything. I thought it stunk (still do; pipe smoke is more tolerable imo (and lends a classy Middle-earth expedition feel)), but as long as you're not starting forest fires I don't really care.

Billy Ray
(rosyfinch) - M

Locale: the mountains
Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 09:01:48 MST Print View

I love the line from the movie, Planes, Trains and Automobiles:

John Candy: [spilling over his seat next to Steve Martin on airplane]
"Do you mind if I smoke?"

Steve Martin:
"Do you mind if I fart?"

Billy

Jon Leibowitz
(jleeb) - F - MLife

Locale: 4Corners
Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 10:31:58 MST Print View

"@Billy & @Mark: I am surprised you go without campfires."

I think most people around here, and in general people that practice LNT, go without fires in the back country and especially in wilderness areas. I wouldn't light a fire unless I absolutely had to for warmth. The impact is too great.

Then again, if you are in a developed camp ground in a national park with fire rings....let your pyromaniac side have some fun!

As someone that doesn't smoke cigars or light fires, I can say that both are equally as annoying in the back country....I can also say I really don't care when I experience them....just an excuse to keep walking :)

Edited by jleeb on 01/16/2014 10:33:18 MST.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 11:06:55 MST Print View

"@Billy & @Mark: I am surprised you go without campfires."

I don't "go without". Its not remotely on my radar, and never has been. I don't need a fire for warmth. I don't need it for cooking. I have no interest in it for entertainment, especially when I'm solo, which is most of the time. I don't need it as as the psychological safety blanket I think many use one for. At this point I don't need to "push the darkness away". I'd rather embrace it - there are so few places in civilization anymore where we can even experience real dark.

I have a firestarting kit, and know how to use it in an emergency to get warm. Otherwise I think of fires in the back-country as an activity that has zero value for me.

I have nothing against a fire, and like looking into them. But for me out in the wilderness, leaving aside the wilderness ethics part, and LNT which is also important to me, I don't see a point. I think in this I'm probably right in the middle of the bell curve on this site.

On the other hand I don't push the "wilderness ethics" part on anyone else - I rely on the local custodian to set the rules for everyone else. But to me the whole fire thing - let alone the cigar, is part of the "ultra-camping" mentality which is more about bringing as much civilization into wilderness as possible. I'm not against it at all, just not for me.

But it can be somewhat clueless to assume a set of values (like a fire) in other people, and then go an plant you fire (or cigar) right down on top of someone.

Edited by millonas on 01/16/2014 11:18:37 MST.

Billy Ray
(rosyfinch) - M

Locale: the mountains
Re: Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 11:12:28 MST Print View

+ + 1 Mark

Never even enters my mind to have a fire when backpacking.
Love seeing the stars at night.

Besides, where I camp (above 9 or 10,000 feet) the parks don't allow fires as it burns up the stuff that makes the already scarce soil.

Billy

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: west coast best coast
fire on 01/16/2014 12:00:20 MST Print View

What do you guys do when camping in the winter? Crawl into your sleeping bag for 13 hours?

Edited by justin_baker on 01/16/2014 12:03:57 MST.

Travis Bernard
(DispatchesfromtheNorth) - F - M

Locale: Lake Laberge
Re: Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 14:08:51 MST Print View

I think this is a situation where the climate and eco-system you are backpacking in will dictate how high fire ranks on your list of importance. I get that in densely populated, high impact areas, or areas with warm/moderate temperatures fire may not be necessary, and may even be frowned upon by LNT ethics.

However, in the boreal forest fire is an integral part of life. We use wood to heat our cabin, and whether at home or out hiking/fishing/car-camping, etc we are never far removed from bucking, splitting, gathering, or burning wood. If you asked a group of hunters, fisherman, trappers, backpackers, and weekend warriors who live in the boreal forest what was the most important survival tool they had on them when they were out, 9 times out of 10 the answer would be the ability to make fire (that 1 person who dissented would probably come around after thinking about it).

It never gets truly dark at the peak of summer here, but it can still get quite cold (near or below freezing is possible) and I can't imagine sitting around shivering or stuffing our bags with extra down jackets when a warm fire is easily had. In the winter, you'd be foolish to not have a fire whenever possible.

On our hiking trips we use fire in the morning for coffee and oatmeal. At night it cooks our suppers, boils our water, dries any wet clothes and provides us with warmth. Not to mention, if you cook with fire there's no need to haul around a stove or fuel for extra weight!

A fire starting kit is the one piece of equipment that I ALWAYS have on me, regardless of whether I'm just taking the dog for a walk on our local trails or whether it's a 50 day expedition.

Sorry for the long rant. I just can't fathom fire being viewed not only as unnecessary, but as something that has zero value. Fire certainly provides an added level of comfort on trips, and not just psychologically.

If fire is a psychological crutch that we can do without I would suggest that we can also do without sleeping bags and tarps. They are a safety blanket as well, and much more literally!

Just my thoughts...

Cheers,
Travis

PS - Again, I do recognize that the importance of fire varies from place to place, but still...

EDITED FOR SPELLING

Edited by DispatchesfromtheNorth on 01/16/2014 14:11:10 MST.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 14:17:13 MST Print View

Travis, your views seem about right for the Far North.

Either fortunately or unfortunately, some of us live an operate in the mid latitudes. Most of California, in particular, is suffering from the driest year on record, and this drought condition is developing huge wildfire risk. So, many of the places where we operate as backpackers have simply banned wood campfires altogether. On most of the group trips that I've been on, if a person lit up a cigar, they would be shunned for the rest of the trip.

--B.G.--

Travis Bernard
(DispatchesfromtheNorth) - F - M

Locale: Lake Laberge
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 14:34:35 MST Print View

Hey BG,

Yeah, that's why I wanted to make sure I prefaced my rant noting that it does vary depending on where you live/hike. And unfortunately, there are also a lot of folks who are pretty careless with fires too. We get bans on fires up here in the summer during fire season, but it's usually not enforced with much gusto. Conservation officers tend to focus on making sure people are being fire smart because I think there is an understanding that with so few conservation officers and such a large space it's pretty tough to enforce things like fire bans. (Not to mention, Yukoners can be pretty self-righteous and defiant themselves)

On the Teslin River two years ago we ended up following a group who were cutting down green spruce and trying to burn it. We were one day behind them and also came upon 2 different fires that they had left smoldering (on a hot, sunny day). Not overly impressive. We discovered later that they were German tourists.

Cheers,
Travis

Brian Crain
(brcrain) - F

Locale: So Cal
re on 01/16/2014 14:53:36 MST Print View

I'm all for a fire (and cigars and loud music) where it is allowed and practical. Sadly, I'm in the Southwest and whatever isn't currently on fire will be soon. This drought is really hurting.

A lot of the issues of cigars and boomboxes and obnoxious behaviours goes away if everyone does one simple thing: respect the rights of others. That includes imposing your will or the affects of your behaviours on others.

Apply the "Golden Rule" folks...

Jon Leibowitz
(jleeb) - F - MLife

Locale: 4Corners
Re: re on 01/16/2014 16:42:38 MST Print View

"I'm all for a fire (and cigars and loud music) where it is allowed and practical. Sadly, I'm in the Southwest and whatever isn't currently on fire will be soon. This drought is really hurting.

A lot of the issues of cigars and boomboxes and obnoxious behaviours goes away if everyone does one simple thing: respect the rights of others. That includes imposing your will or the affects of your behaviours on others.

Apply the "Golden Rule" folks..."


Come on Brian, it's 2014. We live in a society of "me me me". Rights of others? What are you, a socialist? ;)

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Re: Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 16:58:39 MST Print View

Travis, that is NOT the kind of fire I was talking about, and I think you know that!

Of course I was talking about the issue of "tourist fires", possibly with other "survival" uses such as toasted marshmallows and smores, and possibly even (God forbid) the singing of camp fire songs. It is obvious I was talking about the making of a fire as part of a functionless ritual, perhaps as a holdover from boy scout days, or perhaps from watching too many westerns. I hope it is clearI was not talking about the making of a fire as a necessary part of your trip.

On top of that I was saying *I* never need it. Anyone else can do as they like, especially if you don't plunk down 20 feet up wind from me. If you want to include an external fire as part of your necessary needs, more power too you. On the other had Andrew Skurka did his circuit of Alaska in temps from (I believe) down -15 or -20F without making external wood fires, so it isn't impossible to survive without it, even in Alaska much of the time, let alone in the Sierra Nevada. Still, in many environments it may be easier to rely on fire than to have to prepare for such conditions with extra gear. I give you that too. John Muir went backpacking with an overcoat and some matches.

But since you guys are, seemingly, deliberately misconstruing the issues for rant sakes, I give you the fire to keep warm(er). If my system failed I would do the same. However I get along quite well with the cooking part with my stoves - and just to stave off the next rant, no I do not mean I can cook an Elk in a Jetboil - I'll give you that one as well.

Edited by millonas on 01/16/2014 17:20:15 MST.

Brian Crain
(brcrain) - F

Locale: So Cal
Re: Re: re on 01/16/2014 17:18:23 MST Print View

"Come on Brian, it's 2014. We live in a society of "me me me". Rights of others? What are you, a socialist? ;)"

Great point! I wish it truly were a "me me me" society - as compared to what we have - one in which everyone applied a moderate amount of common sense as well as respect towards others - then we'd have everyone doing their own thing and minding their own business... instead of the "everyone will bend to my will, even if it is entirely insane" kind of armchair-activist mentality so many have.

For the record, I'm as far from a socialist as it gets in pretty much every regard! ;)

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: west coast best coast
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 17:46:49 MST Print View

A small cook fire is so easy, leaves very little ash, and is very easy to put out and clean up. With everyone on here so obsessed about saving weigh, it really confuses me why I'm one of the few people who utilizes fire for cooking. Fuel weight can really add up on longer trips.

Katharina ....
(Kat_P) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Coast
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 17:52:16 MST Print View

Justin, don't you know that it is better for the environment to have a fuel canister made, sold, shipped, filled, sold again, shipped, inventoried, stocked, bagged, transported home, used and then disposed, moved somewhere else and the recycled and moved again ( probably a few more transports than that)....than burining your eight twigs??
Gosh young man, don't they teach you anything at school?

;-)

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 19:19:36 MST Print View

Mark's last two posts are excellent!

Travis Bernard
(DispatchesfromtheNorth) - F - M

Locale: Lake Laberge
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 19:40:54 MST Print View

Hey Mark,

No need to worry man. Wasn't trying to start an argument or anything. I just have a soft spot for camp fires ;). And really, my main reason for posting was just to provide a different point of view. I think context is the biggest factor in determining need on any given trip. I think Skurka is crazy, but it makes sense to use a stove (if I remember correctly he used it in his vestibule, correct?) when you are trying to make as much distance as you can, and are only stopping to set up camp, eat and sleep. Though even if I were, I don't think I would be able to forgo a fire ever couple nights to relax around.

Hell, the only reason I joined BPL was because I found it interesting getting input from people from all over North America (and the world) who hike in different climates, seasons, and with different goals. Differing viewpoints only serve to enhance my own skills outdoors. And coming from a place where campsites are stocked with free wood for burning it just struck me as interesting that others have far different opinions about fire and I wanted to contribute to the conversation. Apologies if any offence was taken, or your words were misconstrued. It wasn't intended. For what it's worth, I don't care if people warm up their food by rubbing their hands together quickly.


Oh, and back on the main topic: IE: smoking, fires, and boomboxes: My girlfriend and I ended up camping right next to a bunch of younger folk (early 20's) last summer. When we went to bed they were drinking, smoking(cigarettes and weed), and listening to music. Looked like they were enjoying themselves as well as keeping things relatively clean. Before drifting off my girlfriend and I laughed about the old days when that was our idea of a good time. Then we fell asleep. We laughed again the next morning as we were packing up, remembering the horror of waking up hungover in a hot tent. Then we went hiking...

Cheers,

Travis

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 19:53:51 MST Print View

Justin, I agree! OK? Just who are you arguing your case to? The straw man is suitably chastised. As for me....

I guess we are making progress because no one is still arguing I am depriving myself by not having a bonfire, or that there are other *practical* choices. FYI, last year I got a caldera cone specifically because I wanted to have the option of using a small fire to cook my meal and coffee. Unfortunately, for reasons some of the others posters have pointed out, here in CA in many places for the past few seasons even such as these have been illegal.

So again do what you like, and for the n'th time not what I was (have ever) been talking about, especially as a small cook fire doesn't make much smoke isn't even remotely in the category of the kind of tourist/entertainment fires one commonly sees in the back country, suitable for roasting a whole pig, or perhaps for sacrificing virgins. Even these are OK with me if the custodians of the local wilderness have decided it is ok. Who am I to judge. I just disagree that it is obvious that I can't enjoy going into nature without a big honkin' decorative fire at night.


"Justin, don't you know that it is better for the environment to have a fuel canister made, sold, shipped, filled, sold again, shipped, inventoried, stocked, bagged, transported home, used and then disposed, moved somewhere else and the recycled and moved again ( probably a few more transports than that)....than burining your eight twigs??
Gosh young man, don't they teach you anything at school?
"

This would be a lot funnier if someone - anyone - on here actually said anything like that to make fun of. I believe one poster mentioned that open fires of any kind were banned in many drought stricken areas of CA currently do to the risk of starting a forest fire - such as the huge one last year on the northwest edge of Yosemite. That is about it - safer in some cases for the environment - not for your karma.

"What do you guys do when camping in the winter? Crawl into your sleeping bag for 13 hours?"

I usually work on my memoir.

Edited by millonas on 01/16/2014 20:14:06 MST.

Travis Bernard
(DispatchesfromtheNorth) - F - M

Locale: Lake Laberge
Big fire, Little fire... on 01/16/2014 20:04:50 MST Print View

Hey Mark,

Does this quote sum up how you feel about 'tourist fires'? I've always love the quote:


"White man builds big fire, stands back. Indian builds little fire, huddles close" - Unknown.

Cheers,
Travis

Travis Bernard
(DispatchesfromtheNorth) - F - M

Locale: Lake Laberge
Re: Big fire, Little fire... on 01/16/2014 20:06:41 MST Print View

Though I do believe it's important to always have the ability to get a big fire going quickly in case a virgin needs to be sacrificed or a witch needs to be burned...

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 20:08:02 MST Print View

" We laughed again the next morning as we were packing up, remembering the horror of waking up hungover in a hot tent. Then we went hiking..."

I hope you got up real early and talked real loud near their tent. LOL

There were some guys one time in an organized campground at Yosemite - away from the valley so it was pretty quiet there. They were two loud SoCal Frat boy type guys who just finished doing half-dome which I knew because they were talking so loudly. And they had a boom box, and you could pretty much hear it through most of the large campground. Unfortunately I had the spot right next to them, and a asked very meekly if they could turn it off because, unlike them, I was just starting, and was trying to get to sleep because I had to get up early to go on my trek. They basically told me they didn't have to because "the rules state we don't have to be quiet until 9 o'clock". So, so much for courtesy on their part.

To get back to the thread at bit, it seem to be the consensus amongst some is that if you were smoking a cigar in a campground, and someone politely asked if you could stop, or smoke it somewhere else, then the only reason for this would be because that person was some kind of political correctness N****.

Sometimes courtesy is just courtesy.

Katharina ....
(Kat_P) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Coast
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 21:07:19 MST Print View

Take it easy Mark, really. It's safer for the environment and your Karma.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: west coast best coast
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Apologies, egocentric, and self-righteous on 01/16/2014 22:56:33 MST Print View

"Not in my backyard."

Scott Martin
(DamnYankee) - M

Locale: Augusta County
Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 07/05/2014 17:24:11 MDT Print View

Monica Lewinsky’s preferred hers in the White House. Sorry, couldn't resist

Mitchell Ebbott
(mebbott) - F - M

Locale: SoCal
Re: Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods? on 07/05/2014 17:56:17 MDT Print View

Necromancing a 3 year old thread with a 6 month old last post to tell a 16 year old joke... we may have a record here!

Alexander S
(Cascadicus) - M
Re: Who does not love a cigar in the woods...as long as you are a cigar smoker and have a 2 miles radius of isolation on 07/06/2014 16:57:04 MDT Print View

I don't like them in the woods
I don't like them by the brooks

I don't like them in my lungs
I suspect they'd give me the runs.


That being said... Enjoy what you like to do and that's a fine case!

How about for keeping a wildflower uncrushed until you get home and can give it to your wife/ gf or dry it? I used one for that once and it worked great.

Yes. I picked a wildflower.

Kerry Wilson
(mntnflyr4fun) - F

Locale: North of Eugene, South of Portland
Cigar Tube on 07/06/2014 21:08:52 MDT Print View

I just love it when all the smoking Nazi's come running to save the planet while they drive their gas guzzling, exhaust gas emitting Hummers to the trailhead.....

WOW.....

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Cigar Tube on 07/06/2014 21:25:48 MDT Print View

Only thing I love more that a good stereotype is a random mash-up of disparate stereotypes. Bravo! Throw in a bit of impotent rage and I'm tempted to go and make popcorn.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Cigar Tube on 07/06/2014 21:26:32 MDT Print View

OK Godwin's Law. This thread is done.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Re: Cigar Tube on 07/06/2014 21:33:28 MDT Print View

Weren't they already mentioned earlier in this thread a long while back? There should be a corollary about intermittently recurring references. Something like "the rate of re-degradation is proportional to the number of re-starts of the thread", or something.

Edited by millonas on 07/06/2014 21:37:17 MDT.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Cigar Tube on 07/06/2014 21:38:25 MDT Print View

So was Lewinsky. Time to move on then.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Re: Cigar Tube on 07/06/2014 21:50:45 MDT Print View

Totally off topic, and weirdly enough, I knew Mike Godwin quite well - he lived in the same coop I did in Austin when I was in grad school there. Never heard him mention anything about NAZIs back then, but internet barely existed at that time.

Kerry Wilson
(mntnflyr4fun) - F

Locale: North of Eugene, South of Portland
cigar tubo on 07/07/2014 00:08:16 MDT Print View

I really like the idea of wrapping repair tape(s) around the outside and filling the inside with patch kits for inflatables etc....

Pocket fishing kit or fire makins...also great uses....these things look like they would be awesome in the pack...gonna have to take up cigars again to get a few I guess...

Kerry Wilson
(mntnflyr4fun) - F

Locale: North of Eugene, South of Portland
Cigar Tubo on 07/07/2014 00:17:21 MDT Print View

On second thought, it might be worth carrying a few just to set up around the perimeter like no trespassing signs to keep anti-campfire and smoking Nazi's from camping too near....

Oh wait, I guess the smoke from my bonfire will accomplish that....

Edited by mntnflyr4fun on 07/07/2014 00:59:30 MDT.