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A Do-It-All Water Purifier?
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Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
A Do-It-All Water Purifier? on 12/30/2006 11:48:59 MST Print View

Sawyer Water Purifier -- The Model SP 125 looks small, light, effective and easy to use. Wonder how heavy it is? Comments?

Edited by ben2world on 12/30/2006 12:12:03 MST.

Richard Matthews
(food) - F

Locale: Colorado Rockies
Re: A Do-It-All Water Purifier? on 12/30/2006 12:03:23 MST Print View

Ben,

We were hoping you would get one and write a review.

I would be concerned about the filter clogging on anything other than the clearest water. Sucking a golf ball through a garden hose is not a skill that I desire to develope.

I tried the bottle filters. They work great for dayhikes when you might just want a little extra water, but I would not want to rely on one for a longer hike.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: A Do-It-All Water Purifier? on 12/30/2006 12:10:14 MST Print View

Richard:

I found a website with more info and changed the above link. Give it a look if you like.

Christopher Plesko
(Pivvay) - F

Locale: Rocky Mountains
Re: Re: A Do-It-All Water Purifier? on 12/30/2006 12:19:49 MST Print View

The steripen looks like a do it all to me :) I'm getting the new model with my xmas money.

Caleb Wininger
(caleb_sandler) - F

Locale: Michigan
Re: Re: Re: A Do-It-All Water Purifier? on 12/30/2006 12:46:06 MST Print View

the steripen doesn't remove pinecones, fish scales or slimy flora.

this looks similar to the first need purifier, which i use. some have had problems with clogs, and the setup (pump/filter/hose)weighs 11 oz. that can be a disaster. i've personally filtered mud puddles into evian with mine and never had a problem. but you are running a risk w/this type of filtration. never travel w/out iodine/aqua mira if you go this route. according to another sitei found it looks like it weighs about 22 oz. kinda pricey too.

Edited by caleb_sandler on 12/30/2006 12:54:39 MST.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: A Do-It-All Water Purifier? on 12/30/2006 13:03:27 MST Print View

Caleb: 22.4 ounces is the total shipping weight. Some of that will be packaging. Wonder what's the weight of the filter itself?

Chris: There are pros and cos with the SteriPen, of course. I used to own one. It is not designed to be a "do it all". First off, the UV technology works only in reasonably clear water -- and is very much suboptimal with turbid water (say river water following an overnight rainfall). But it's turbid water that you need performance the most!

The older model SteriPen is relatively heavy. The newer one is much lighter -- however, because of its much shorter light tube, it won't work well with tall containers (e.g. 1L bladders and up). I talked with a SteriPen rep -- and she suggested that when filling taller water containers, you should "nuke" the water in a cup first, then pour the treated water into the bladder, cup by cup.

Edited by ben2world on 12/30/2006 13:35:15 MST.

Thomas Knighton
(Tomcat1066) - F

Locale: Southwest GA
RE: do-it-all purifier? on 12/30/2006 17:38:09 MST Print View

If you're worried about debris clogging the filter (or steripen), you can always prefilter by using a bandana or something similar to keep debris out of your bladder and/or bottles.

As for the filter shown, I'm concerned mostly about the weight. Even though 22 oz is shipping weight, it's still probably in the 1 lbs range by itself. A bit much, even for my newbie butt :D

Tom

Richard Sansom
(LandRover) - F
Re: RE: do-it-all purifier? on 12/30/2006 18:04:07 MST Print View

I'm contemplating the new steripen, together with one of the 32oz wide-mouthed soft-sided nalgenes, or even a pepsi bottle, or using my MSR Ti Kettle of coffee mug.
A bandanna or even a coffee filter should solve the debris issue without adding much weight.
I guess the problem is I'm just adding weight which is getting me up towards a light pump anyway. I'm looking at $130 to shave 5.5oz.

Donna C
(leadfoot) - M

Locale: Middle Virginia
Re: Re: RE: do-it-all purifier? on 12/30/2006 18:57:25 MST Print View

I see it also comes with a pre-filter.
http://www.hydro-photon.com/steripen_products.html

Richard Sansom
(LandRover) - F
Re: Re: Re: RE: do-it-all purifier? on 12/30/2006 19:52:20 MST Print View

Adds another 1.5 oz though, not that it is much, but 3.5oz for steripen, 2oz for soft-sided nalgene = 7oz.
11oz for a Katadyn Hiker.
$130 for 4oz?

todd harper
(funnymoney) - MLife

Locale: Sunshine State
Re: Re: Re: Re: RE: do-it-all purifier? on 12/30/2006 20:19:36 MST Print View

I bought the Steripen Adventurer w/my Christmas money! A coffee filter over a water container does a truly amazing job on lake water from across the street. The water is definitely clear enough after that for the Steripen to work. (That is, if it works like they claim!!!)

There's not just a weight savings -- it cuts down on volume, too.

Caleb Wininger
(caleb_sandler) - F

Locale: Michigan
Re: Re: Re: Re: RE: do-it-all purifier? on 12/30/2006 20:19:48 MST Print View

i don't think the katadyn hiker purifies though. it just filters. am i wrong about that...?

that's the whole debate here, the best combo of weight/reliability/effective purification and debris removal/cost. i've done a lot of reading on the available systems and nothing really seems to be a do-it-all. i guess you have to chose based on what's most important to you. i find the taste of sterilizing chemicals to be brutal so it's worth the extra weight (11 oz w. prefilter/pump/hose/canister) to carry the first need to me, though i know it may fail in the field.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
RE: do-it-all purifier? on 12/30/2006 20:27:59 MST Print View

Caleb:

I'm with you on this one! Right now, I use a simple pre-filter, and then treat the water with Micropur tablets. Easy and light as heck -- but althought the Micropur's taste is a lot less offensive than iodine, I still dislike it. Hence the search for alternatives...

The specs of this Sawyer 125 seems to be everything that I want -- filtering of particulates and removal of bacteria, protozoa AND viruses -- without need of any chemicals. Sawyer also states that it's easy to suck, and it can be backwashed.

Hopefully, users can chime in about plusses and minuses -- as well as what the actual weight of this thing is.

Edited by ben2world on 12/30/2006 21:15:56 MST.

Richard Sansom
(LandRover) - F
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: RE: do-it-all purifier? on 12/30/2006 21:26:54 MST Print View

Hey Todd, the adventurer is certainly appealing to me too.
Caleb - When it comes to viruses, then I'm not really going to be going places where they are a problem - and if I get really stuck with bad water, then I always carry a few back-up micropur tabs anyway.
I guess I'm just thinking through the adventurer out aloud.

Edited by LandRover on 12/30/2006 21:27:44 MST.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: do-it-all purifier? on 12/30/2006 21:33:48 MST Print View

Richard:

Think about camping where a river is your water source. It's the morning after an overnight rainstorm. The water's all churned up and brown. Your Adventurer won't filter out any of it (which we know) and worse, its UV technology doesn't really work in turbid water -- just when you need it the most. A bandana "pre filter" isn't going to change brown river water into reasonably clear water for the UV.

The Adventurer obviously has its strengths, but a "do it all" it isn't.

In any case, I posted this thread hoping to gather some user feedback on the Sawyer Model 125 filter/purifier.

Edited by ben2world on 12/30/2006 21:37:36 MST.

Christopher Plesko
(Pivvay) - F

Locale: Rocky Mountains
Re: Re: do-it-all purifier? on 12/30/2006 21:41:07 MST Print View

I agree definitely not a do it all but that plus a few backup MP1 is all I'm taking next year. Don't you usually gather your water before bed anyway? Pretty easy in that case to let it settle out overnight, "decant" and treat. If time was really no object I'd just use MP1 all the time but UV is so much faster in the instances where I need it that it would be worth the extra weight for me.

I keep looking for the ultimate light filter but every one I've seen is either too heavy or doesn't kill everything or has some other downside. If I'm not going to kill it all then I'll just take my chances with MP1 after 30 minutes...

Edited by Pivvay on 12/30/2006 21:42:27 MST.

Douglas Frick
(Otter) - MLife

Locale: Wyoming
Re: Re: do-it-all purifier? on 12/30/2006 22:45:48 MST Print View

>In any case, I posted this thread hoping to gather some user feedback on the Sawyer Model 125 filter/purifier.


OK, I bit. I ordered both the Model 120 filter and the Model 125 purifier (actually the Model 135 purifier kit). When I get them I will report dry and wet weights and flow rates. There isn't a virus threat where I hike, but they claim a longer life for the purifier and if the flow rate is similar to the filter then I suppose there's no reason not to use it. (Anything that's going to clog up the purifier will likely clog up the filter, so that shouldn't make much difference.)

I do wish they had more technical information about the filter, but I suppose it is hard to state a 'pore' size in a non-porous design like this. Instead, they rely on their lab results. I find the claim of virus filtration to be outrageous, but I'm not going to argue with their lab results.

I normally use the UV Aquastar sterilizer (3.8 oz) for clear-water hikes; the Katadyn Pocket filter (21.6 oz dry) if the water is nasty; Aqua Mira (3.2 oz) in the winter for overnight purification (since I'm melting snow); and I always carry several Katadyn Micropur MP-1 tablets (4 tablets: 0.1 oz) in my first aid kit just in case. (The absolute lightest solution is if my friend Grant carries his filter :) I've found with Micropur MP-1 tabs that the water has no residual taste if it sloshes around for 45 minutes or so; just be sure to blow the fumes off the top of the water before drinking. Oh, for the days when all I carried was a plastic camping cup (0.7 oz)...

Edited by Otter on 12/30/2006 23:31:57 MST.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re. Sawyer In-Line Filter / Purifier on 12/30/2006 22:59:40 MST Print View

Douglas:

Thanks in advance, best of luck with your upcoming filter/purifier, and looking forward to your feedback!

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re. Sawyer In-Line Filter / Purifier on 01/02/2007 10:28:48 MST Print View

In case anyone is interested, I called Sawyer and got the following info:

Filter (SP120) - 5.5" length x 1.75" diameter - 2 ounces.
Purifier (SP125) - 6.25" x 2.75" - 8 ounces.

Once primed (i.e. flushed water through filter or purifier so it's nice and wet) -- company claims that very little effort is required to suck water through.

Now, I'm torn between getting the purifier (no waiting time!) versus saving 6 ounces and getting the filter instead (15 min. waiting time for Micropur tablets to kill off any viruses, then suck water through the filter)...

Edited by ben2world on 01/04/2007 10:48:00 MST.

paul johnson
(pj) - F

Locale: LazyBoy in my Den - miss the forest
Re: Re. Sawyer In-Line Filter / Purifier on 01/02/2007 12:25:46 MST Print View

Ben,

Just some thoughts...


For long treks, how long does it need to be b/f the MicroPure ends up weighing 6+ oz?

How about replacement cost of filter vs. purifier, is this an issue for your budget?

Fifteen minutes, to me at least, isn't very long. That said, I still might go for the purifier version of the Sawyer. Glad it's not my decision for another 3-4 months (it's been on my 2-B-acquired list since last Spring & is only now moving closer to the top).

Is there a difference (i forget; it's been a while since i've read their specs) is the amount of water each can filter/purify? [this relates also to the replacement cost issue if there is a difference b/t the two units].


Again, just some thoughts...