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paul johnson
(pj) - F

Locale: LazyBoy in my Den - miss the forest
Looking for info... on 12/27/2006 05:56:13 MST Print View

What precisely is a Swag?

Is Swag a general term for a shelter, or is it more specific?

From recently looking at pics of various Swags, they seem to take many forms.

What is the range of forms that a Swag may take? What materials are they generally construted of?

Do they all have padded floors? Bug Protection? etc.

Do any use trekking poles for support?

What are the differences, if any, to the Aussie/NZ mind between a swag, a bivy, and a tent or tarptent?

I've never seen the term "Swaggie". Is it not proper to call a Swag a "Swaggie"?

Many thanks in advance for the insightful replies that i'm sure to receive.

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: Looking for info... on 12/27/2006 06:36:50 MST Print View

What precisely is a Swag?

For a few decades I've labored under the impression that a SWAG was a Scientific Wild A** Guess.

Not to be confused with a WAG.

paul johnson
(pj) - F

Locale: LazyBoy in my Den - miss the forest
Re: Re: Looking for info... on 12/27/2006 07:36:02 MST Print View

It's a legitimate term used by, at least, those downunder to describe some types of shelters. Just looking for more specifics, that's all.

Roger B
(rogerb) - MLife

Locale: Here and there
A swag, a swaggie ... on 12/27/2006 08:34:39 MST Print View

A swag as you will find in Australia now is probably best described as a heavy duty canvas bivy about 3 ft wide and 8 ft long. It will contain mattress and blankets or maybe a sleeping bag. They are used by persons working on farms, in the outback etc and found in the back of "utes" (SUV trucks) etc. and of course on horses. They are not UL or anywhere near

A swagman is a term that was used for "men of the road" that is they wandered the country doing odd jobs, borrowing the occasional sheep etc I am sure there was an american equivalent. The name came from carrying all their belongings

I am sure other aussies will add to this very rough description.

A quick look at swag will show you that swags have now become more like tents.

Edited by rogerb on 12/27/2006 08:44:26 MST.

J R
(RavenUL) - F
Re: A swag, a swaggie ... on 12/27/2006 13:05:17 MST Print View

Sounds like an American Cowboy Bedroll.