Forum Index » Make Your Own Gear » Binding Tarp Edges With Grosgrain


Display Avatars Sort By:
James Cavan
(JamesCavan) - F

Locale: UK
Binding Tarp Edges With Grosgrain on 10/06/2011 06:27:29 MDT Print View

I'm going to make a tarp at some point in the near future so have been looking around at other peoples work.

Anyway I've several examples I've come across have used grosgrain along the edges of the tarp.

One such example is a guy over at Bike and Bivy who has posted here.
http://www.bikeandbivi.co.uk/php/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=181
That particular tarp was spinnker so the edge binding may have been used to avoid stress at the stitching?

He also uses it for a silnylon tarp.
http://www.bikeandbivi.co.uk/php/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=239

The OES tarps also use edge binding. Is there a particularly good reason to do this instead of a rolled hem or similar appropriate seam.

If your thinking .. but what is your tarp going to be like well read on!

Essentially a 8.5' x 5.5' with fairly shallow cat cuts along the shorter edges and 2 on each of the long sides.A tarp

I've been using a duomid for a while now and want to move to a proper tarp!

So is there any good reason whether or not to bind the edges with grosgrain?

Thanks very much, James

Brendan Swihart
(brendans) - MLife

Locale: Fruita CO
Re: Binding Tarp Edges With Grosgrain on 10/06/2011 07:53:30 MDT Print View

I can't think of a good reason to do it. Seems heavy and unnecessarily complicated compared to a simple rolled seam.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Binding Tarp Edges With Grosgrain on 10/06/2011 08:13:27 MDT Print View

No reason to add grosgrain

Heavier, costs more, takes more time, doesn't add any benefit.

Just hem edges - folder over twice and sew one row of stitches.

Edited by retiredjerry on 10/06/2011 08:14:07 MDT.

todd harper
(funnymoney) - MLife

Locale: Sunshine State
Re: Binding Tarp Edges With Grosgrain on 10/06/2011 08:21:29 MDT Print View

The only benefit I've seen is appearance - it looks cool but definitely not needed.

Michael Davis
(mad777) - F

Locale: South Florida
Re: Binding Tarp Edges With Grosgrain on 10/06/2011 08:45:21 MDT Print View

I don't use it on the tarps I've made and they are no worse for wear. I do sew a few inches of it on the edge at the tie-outs for reinforcement.

You would have to use 3/4" grossgain which weighs 1-1/3 grams per foot. So, that would add about 1.4 ounces to your tarp.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Binding Tarp Edges With Grosgrain on 10/06/2011 15:25:59 MDT Print View

By and large, it is just excess weight. A rolled hem (3 layers) maybe 10 mm wide is quite enough for most tarps and tents. Extra reinforcing at corners is good/desirable to handle the high stress of the attachment point.

Cheers

Philip Carr
(unsponsored) - F

Locale: UK
reasons on 10/08/2011 15:29:12 MDT Print View

Full width of material can be used. Rolling three times for a hem will really shorten the fabric. Especially if making a tarp using the using the rolls width rather than going fabrics.

I also find it much faster as my sewing machine has a nice little attachment. It works great on cat cuts as well.

Samuel C. Farrington
(scfhome) - M

Locale: Chocorua NH, USA
Binding Tarp Edges on 10/11/2011 18:43:21 MDT Print View

Philip, Could you elaborate a bit. Could not figure out how you are finishing the edges. Thanks.

James Cavan
(JamesCavan) - F

Locale: UK
Aaaaaaaaaah on 10/12/2011 16:50:27 MDT Print View

Thanks for the reply's, how does the grosgrain stretch when wet compared to silnylon? As we all know when silnylon gets wet it sags so obviously needs to be tightened - or does the cat cut solve that problem?

Ta

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: reasons on 10/12/2011 22:42:57 MDT Print View

Philip,

Inspired by your post I googled and found that I can get a binding attachment for my bernina.

So what type and size of binding do you use? Can you buy it by the roll or do you cut your own?

Daryl