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Trying to get lighter
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Conner D
(cdipaolo) - F

Locale: SoCal
Trying to get lighter on 09/19/2011 21:24:59 MDT Print View

Here is my current gear list:
https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=true&srcid=0ByaqwRpCJi-0MDY4ZGZiZDItMTQzNi00ZDk2LTkxZTItMDM1MjI3ZGM4ZTk0&hl=en

I have plans to get a REI Flash 65 when I get the money or my birthday comes around. I am looking at lighter packs but I usually have to carry extra gear for people when I backpack so I think that frameless might have too low a load capacity. The sleeping bag is pretty heavy but upgrading that is probably the most expensive thing on the list. I am considering switching from boots to running shoes that I already own which would save 22.4 oz not including socks. My hiking pole(s) weight a lot and I will switch them to (probably) a pair of Black Diamond Z-Poles. Any advice is appreciated.
EDIT: changed my mind fron a Flash 65 to 50 and possibly a frameless pack.

Edited by cdipaolo on 09/21/2011 15:26:02 MDT.

Bryce F.
(bster13) - MLife

Locale: Norwalk, CT
Sacks on 09/19/2011 23:17:21 MDT Print View

Hi Connor,

Random thoughts...GL!


It looks like you have a lot of sacks tied up in your gear list. I don't use any stuff sacks... Put a trashy compactor back inside your pack to keep things dry, them stuff your sleeping back at the bottom, clothes in top of that, then your stove and food bag. The heavier stuff on top will compress the compressible things on bottom. And if you need a little more compression, just squish it down from the top just enough to close up your pack... let your high loft item loft as much as possible inside the pack.

You only need one decent sized silnylon or Cuben Fiber food bag (you put all your food in here and hang it as bear bag) with quart sized zip lock bags per meal or snack.

Depending on your area, drop the stakes and use sticks. In the NE I haven't carried stakes in years.

Drop the camp sandals...if your hiking shoes are comfy, rock them all the time!

Alcohol bottle... not exactly sure of the weight, but the 8 oz Poland Springs water bottles are the lightest bottle I could find for carrying alcohol nested inside my Heiny Keg Can pot. Def. less than 1.1 oz.

2 Photon Microlights are lighter and provide redundancy vs. a headlamp. You can velcro them to brim of hat for hand's free usage.

Swap Swiss Army knife for Stanley Mitey Knife.

Drop the batteries... Microlights (in red and orange) go for many hours and back each other up.

Def try the train runners over hiking boots provided you have good ankles.

Kent C.
(kent) - M

Locale: High Sierra
Trying to get lighter - sacks on 09/19/2011 23:49:46 MDT Print View

Conner,

Couldn't agree more with Bryce about the stuff sacks & how to pack.

I used to think sacks helped me be organized. Consider: What they really do is add unnecessary weight and make you pack twice (stuff the sack and then the sack into your pack); a real time waster.

So much simpler and faster to get out of camp in the morning without stuff sacks!

2ยข

Have fun.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Trying to get lighter - sacks on 09/20/2011 00:04:58 MDT Print View

I never use sacks either. I just aggressively shove my sleeping bag, any clothes, and tarp in my pack. Fill up all the gaps. My water bottles or any heavy stuff will help weight it down and compress it.

Conner D
(cdipaolo) - F

Locale: SoCal
thoughts on 09/20/2011 15:10:12 MDT Print View

Thanks for the input. I will definitely try my running shoes on my next hike. The reason for the camp sandals were that the boots I have are not very comfortable for around camp wear. I'll switch to just using quart bags for meals and just putting all my food in the summit pack instead of a gallon bag. I will try to order some of the photon lights. As far as not using stakes, depending on the area I'm hiking in, there are not enough stock and lots of rocks. I will remove 2 of the stakes that serve no purpose in my current tarp setup. Thanks for the help!

Eric Swab
(ericswab)

Locale: Rockies
Trying to get lighter on 09/20/2011 17:45:42 MDT Print View

Conner,

I started with the REI Flash 65 pack, it is a great value, you can use it with and without the frame, and has a great warranty. However, it doesn't compress well, with things in your pack the mesh side pockets hardly have room for anything, a water bottle is hard to get back in, the outer back pocket is flat, and has little volume, just not trail friendly to me compared to others.

If you want to get a pack from REI that is similar look at the Golite Quest, my girlfriend uses one, it has nice outer pockets and a removable frame.

Check out ULA Equipment, nice packs, similar prices, and made in the USA.

Eric

Eric Swab
(ericswab)

Locale: Rockies
Trying to get lighter on 09/20/2011 17:51:05 MDT Print View

Keep your eye out for a Golite Ultra 20 quilt, they pop up on gear swap, otherwise Golite runs periodic 40% off sales, you could pick up a new one at a good price that way too and save a bunch of weight.

Conner D
(cdipaolo) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: Trying to get lighter on 09/20/2011 23:33:18 MDT Print View

Thanks for the input on the pack. I'll look at the Golite quest. I like the idea of the removable frame because of my varying load sized because I sometimes carry extra weight for people (stated in original post). The mesh water bottle pockets would only be used for a fuel bottle and maybe hiking or other poles because I use a bladder for water. The outer mesh pocket might be an issue because I usually use them to stuff stripped layers in the morning quickly. I have looked at ULA packs and they are nice but I like the idea of being able to remove the frame depending on the trip. I do not have a need to get pack from REI but it is the only place near me where I could see it in the store before I buy it.

Bryce F.
(bster13) - MLife

Locale: Norwalk, CT
Not sure of your load.... on 09/21/2011 07:00:10 MDT Print View

....But I just carried 22lbs in my GG Mariposa with no frame. Food for thought.

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/xdpy/forum_thread/53432/index.html

Conner D
(cdipaolo) - F

Locale: SoCal
packs on 09/21/2011 15:25:23 MDT Print View

Interesting about the pack. I was looking at frameless packs too and am looking at the GG G4, Golite Jam, and REI Flash 50 (changed my mind from 65, dont need that much space). The G4 and Flash have my favorite design of the rollable and drawchord lid with the large back stuff pocket. I like the arrangement of the Jam too with the zippered pocket. Which pack do you think would be the best if I sometimes am required to carry a max of 35 lbs (10 days food + water +maybe gear from others) but I usually will carry 15-18 and am hoping to make it less than that. All of the packs have similar designs but I want durability, load carrying ability, and value. Thanks in advance.

Bryce F.
(bster13) - MLife

Locale: Norwalk, CT
Re: packs on 09/21/2011 15:47:06 MDT Print View

35 pounds would break me so I can't comment there, that's definitely framed pack territory. GG's website lists all their packs and max recommended carrying weight. The G4 is a good pack as well.

Large mesh outside pockets are great for wet shelters and rain gear! GL

Tyler Barcelli
(youngster) - M

Locale: Southeast
Re: packs on 09/21/2011 16:03:44 MDT Print View

35lbs would definitely require me to use a framed pack. I believe if you become a member you can read the SOTMR on framed packs which has a lot of very useful information. Look at http://ula-equipment.com/ they have some good reading to help you decide.

Eric Swab
(ericswab)

Locale: Rockies
Trying to get lighter on 09/21/2011 19:41:56 MDT Print View

Usually the pack is the last purchase, maybe over time if you refine your items carried, especially for others, it will be clearer what pack to get. For instance a lighter quilt definitely creates pack space.

You mentioned not using water bottles, but getting rid of the bladder has a lot of benefits, unless you are traveling in the desert, really a quart bottle is fine during the day, just fill it up along the way. When closer to camp, fill a second bottle or platypus up with what you need for dinner, breakfast, etc. For cooking using bottles is so much easier than a bladder.

Mike Clellands new "ultralight tips" book is really informative, if you join this site there are lots of great articles to read as well.

Conner D
(cdipaolo) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: Trying to get lighter on 09/21/2011 21:32:55 MDT Print View

I do actually travel in the desert or hot chaparral quite often because it is the closest thing to where I live. When I say 35 lbs I carry that very little and usually on the first day of a trip and that is it. My normal load is more like 15-18 with my very heavy (very uncomfortable) external framed pack. I weigh more like 16 and under total when I use my dad's REI pack (not the flash, a older but still pretty new one) that is very comfortable. This is why I am considering the Flash 50. I only use around 40-45 litres of my dads 65 liter pack for an overnight without using almost any external storage. Thanks for the help.

Conner D
(cdipaolo) - F

Locale: SoCal
subscribed on 09/21/2011 21:48:37 MDT Print View

btw I just subscribed thanks to you guys. Don't think I'll regret it.

Jeff McConnell
(Catalyst) - F
ULA Ohm on 09/22/2011 01:45:04 MDT Print View

Check out the ULA Ohm. The max recommended load is 30 lbs, but if you carry 35 lbs very infrequently, then I think it could still work out nicely for you.

Edited by Catalyst on 09/22/2011 01:50:18 MDT.

Conner D
(cdipaolo) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: ULA Ohm on 09/22/2011 08:24:12 MDT Print View

I love the ULA packs for their look and designs, but they cost a lot of money (although the Ohm costs 25$ more than the Jam). The Ohm and Catalyst were one of my main choices but for now I have settled on the Golite Jam. In the frameless backpack SOTM report it says that the Jam can comfortably carry 30 lbs(which Golite also says). The packs carry the same and the cost is similar. I think that I will stay with the Jam as my choice for now because REI sells it which means that I could at any point return it if I don't like it and go with the Flash, Ohm or any other pack. The compression system on the Jam looks very helpful and I could possible cut 9 oz from my pack weight by not bringing a summit pack if it is effective. Thanks for the input, I hadn't seen the Ohm before and it looks like a great pack.

Tim Haynes
(timalan)

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Trying to get lighter on 09/23/2011 12:32:10 MDT Print View

I'd watch the geartrade here for framed packs that would meet your needs. As you've probably already observed, almost everyone here is gradually moving lighter, so that means that there are a lot of lightweight framed packs waiting in closets that have been replaced by frameless packs.

Personally, I have a GoLite Jam I use for most of my hiking, but I keep around a Gregory Z55 framed pack for trips where I am carrying a lot of extra gear for other hikers. I love the Z55. One of the most comfortable packs I've ever seen and still feels good at the end of a day even with 35# in it. Hardest thing at that point is taking it on and off.

Weight from the factory is 3# 5oz on mine, which I think is a 2007 or 2008 model, but it has tons of extra straps and extra length on every strap that can be removed to get it down ~3#.

You're likely to find a good deal on someones' old lightweight framed pack in the range you are looking for.