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Edward Zwibel
(YetiEddie) - MLife

Locale: Sunny San Diego
Ultimate Father Child Trip Abroad Ideas on 09/03/2011 23:47:52 MDT Print View

Ok, here's the hypothetical. I am blessed to have backpacking kids and some time on my hands so here it is.... The wife has signed agreement. I can take one kid at a time, when they're 13, on a backpacking trip anywhere in the world. For a week. So I am interested in ideas. Ideally, something that's not just in the 'mid for 7 days somewhere else... I know we have a beautiful country and we are seeing it here and there now, but I'm up for adventure abroad and other cultures. Say Spain, Great Britain, Ireland, Scotland, Chile Etc... Anywhere. Something with killer scenery and maybe some of the shelters/refugios/hostels where you can get some wine and bread for dinner and a bed rather than being in the bivy all the time. Please you world travelers... fill me in! What is a good week? Time of year and country would be wonderful... I still want wilderness and some alpine type villages etc.... I have 2 years to plan this. Then it's a trip every year or so since I have 6 kids real close together. Thanks for your time and expertise. This site has been wonderful. Lets pretend that no place is off the table. Where should we go?

Mary D
(hikinggranny) - MLife

Locale: Gateway to Columbia River Gorge
Ultimate Father Child Trip Abroad Ideas on 09/03/2011 23:58:42 MDT Print View

Corsica! In addition to the north-south trail (GR20), there are several east-west trails (Da Mare a Mare) which are a bit easier but also very interesting. It's a fascinating place!

Remember that you need a notarized statement from the absent parent to take a child across international borders. This can be a real pain, but international child abductions have been a problem for many years.

Edited by hikinggranny on 09/04/2011 00:00:03 MDT.

Edward Zwibel
(YetiEddie) - MLife

Locale: Sunny San Diego
Thanks Mary on 09/04/2011 00:20:44 MDT Print View

That looks delightful! And at about the right time of year for us... a definite possibility! Appreciate it. This thread is going to get pored over by yours truly quite a bit. I have to have 6 trips essentially......... Much obliged.

Michael Schwartz
(greenwalk) - MLife

Locale: PA & Ireland
Ultimate Father Child Trip Abroad Ideas on 09/04/2011 01:01:12 MDT Print View

If you want great scenery and some of the best mountain huts in the world, check out Norway. But it's expensive, especially for the dollar. However, you can pay a small fee, about $10.00, and set up a tent next to the hut, use the facilities and just pay for any meals you want. In many places, for a small fee you can pack your lunch from the buffet breakfast.

I'd also consider the Pyrenees. More laid back than the Alps and very good huts.

Also, check out the Cicerone Press website, which has plenty of info and desinations to add to the Life To Do list.

Hope this helps,
Mike

Edited by greenwalk on 09/04/2011 01:03:34 MDT.

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: Ultimate Father Child Trip Abroad Ideas on 09/04/2011 07:38:26 MDT Print View

Tall order! So many places to go in the world! Do you intend to take each child to the same place, or each one to a different place? And how much money do you want to spend? All this will depend on the time of year that you can go, too, since the north and south hemispheres have opposite seasons, climate varies, and there are on and off seasons for things like huts and stores.

Here are some suggestions for week-long mountain trips around the world:

Tour du Mont Blanc, France/Switzerland/Italy. It's usually a nine day walk, but depending on how light you go and how far you walk each day, it is even possible in four. Ultra marathon runners do it in two. There are huts everywhere, all very well set up with good food and lots of people to meet. I met a father and his 13 year old daughter doing this and the Haute Route together.

The Pyrenees, as explained above.

The Picos de Europa, in northern Spain. Stunning and little known mountains that you will never forget.

Norway, again like above, for instance Jotunheimen, along with the northern areas of Sweden and Finland, like the Kungsleden and the Nordkalottleden.

The Lycian Way in Turkey.

The Larapinta Trail in Australia (but no huts... very wild).

The Overland Track in Tasmania.

Quite a few of the tracks in New Zealand.

The Japan Alps, especially the North Japan Alps, here where I live. Many very stocked huts, but can be very crowded. A lot of fun though... you will see Japanese at their very best up in the mountains.

The Everest Base Camp Trail in western Nepal, or the Annapurna Circuit (not one week though).

Climb of Mt. Kinabalu in Borneo.

Climb of Mt. Kenya (a little easier than Kilimanjaro)

The Drakensberg Mountains in South Africa

Crossing of the Atlas Mountains in Morocco

The West Coast Trail on Vancouver Island, Canada

Volcano walks in Guatemala

The Na Pali Trail in Hawai'i.

I don't know South America so well yet, but I hear the trails in Patagonia, in Argentina and Chile, are wonderful, like the Torres del Paine and Los Glaciares.

Edited by butuki on 09/04/2011 07:39:46 MDT.

Ben Crocker
(alexdrewreed) - M

Locale: Kentucky
The agreement on 09/04/2011 10:00:43 MDT Print View

What a great plan. I have a similar deal where I take my kids out backpacking/climbing/adventuring when they turn 16. We call it "the man trip". It's been great for us. I am realizing also that it's almost a goodbye since ether are on their way out by then.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Ireland is fabolous on 09/06/2011 07:09:12 MDT Print View

I would say that as I am Irish :-)

Richard Lyon
(richardglyon) - MLife

Locale: Bridger Mountains
Torres del Paine on 09/06/2011 07:18:27 MDT Print View

The Torres del Paine National Park in Chile is the most beautiful place I've ever seen, and would be ideal for hiking with a teenager. The Circuit - the classic hike - is not too difficult (one tough day, really), and many of the designated campsites have canteens that sell food (and beer and wine) as well as refugios. I envy your children.

Richard