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Best way to remove Ti mug from cooking fire
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William Zila
(Ultralightwillinn.m) - MLife

Locale: Albuquerque
Best way to remove Ti mug from cooking fire on 08/30/2011 00:59:21 MDT Print View

What methods do you guys use to get a Ti mug/ pot out of the fire I would be setting it on coals I'm thinking a wet bandana? It's a sp700 So no wire bail handle just the swing out ones

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Best way to remove Ti mug from cooking fire on 08/30/2011 01:33:07 MDT Print View

The wet bandana will work, if it is wet enough.

I try to plant the mug around the heat source so that the heat is on 90% of the mug away from the handles. That way, the handles don't get too hot. Then, I have aluminum foil cut into a 1 inch wide strip and wound around the bottom of the handles. If the heat source goes directly onto that foil, it may melt. But, if the heat is going through the mug and is conducted out into the handles, the foil will not melt, and it gets no more than warm to grab by.

If you want to get crazy, there are silicone materials that are heat resistant and can be applied to the handles without adding too much weight.

--B.G.--

Russ Maynard
(russmay)

Locale: Central California
heat resistant handles on 08/30/2011 06:14:12 MDT Print View

"If you want to get crazy, there are silicone materials that are heat resistant and can be applied to the handles without adding too much weight." I'd like to know more about this . Is a do it yourself type thing? Wear can I buy? ect

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: heat resistant handles on 08/30/2011 06:26:24 MDT Print View

You can get silicone tubing that will slip over the handles(they pull right out with no damage) from various sources including some pet supply houses. Soap it up, curse a little and viola, insulated handles.

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: heat resistant handles on 08/30/2011 10:33:28 MDT Print View

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=14762

Mina Loomis
(elmvine) - MLife

Locale: Central Texas
not wet on 08/30/2011 12:31:43 MDT Print View

If the mug handles are too hot to touch then you don't want the bandanna to be wet. Wet material will transmit the heat to your hand. This is from kitchen experience, not outdoor--wet potholder=scalded hand. If you are concerned about the coals igniting a dry bandanna, you will just need to fold it up really well to keep the edges away from the coals. Folding will make it thicker and better protection for your fingers, too.

Diane Pinkers
(dipink) - M

Locale: Western Washington
GSI pot lifter on 08/30/2011 14:47:31 MDT Print View

Has anyone tried the GSI pot lifter that comes with the Halulite set? It's a rubber (Silicone?) slot for 2 fingers, with a bracket for the thumb. It's very lightweight, but I'm looking at it and wondering about steam burns.

Diane Pinkers
(dipink) - M

Locale: Western Washington
GSI pot lifter on 08/30/2011 14:56:14 MDT Print View

Ok, I'm going to try patching in a picture:GSI pot lifter

Just playing to see if I can make it work.

Donna C
(leadfoot) - M

Locale: Middle Virginia
Re: Best way to remove Ti mug from cooking fire on 08/31/2011 05:01:34 MDT Print View

Crazy, I know, but I always bring leather gloves with me. Very versitile item. I use them to collect wood, take things off of a hot fire, keep hands warm in a pinch, anything to protect my hands.

Ken Strayer
(TheRambler) - F
"Best way to remove Ti mug from cooking fire" on 08/31/2011 05:47:08 MDT Print View

You are going to severely burn yourself using a wet bandana, NEVER use anything wet to move a hot object. If you doubt me put a metal dish in the oven at say 400ish degrees for a few minutes and then reach in to get it with a wet towel/rag/bandanna.... Don't come back and say i didn't warn you. I made this mistake once working at a restraunt and will NEVER do that again.

So, i do this all the time. I use either a snowpeak 700 or 900 typically. I just use my DRY bandana folded over a couple times. During the winter/colder months i just use my rag wool gloves.

Cesar Valdez
(PrimeZombie) - F

Locale: Scandinavia
what I do on 08/31/2011 06:01:17 MDT Print View

Gloves, weight varies.
Dry bandanna/towel, mine weighs around 50g.
Two sticks, 0g if you are in the woods.
Mini multi-tool pliers, 80g plus you get a small knife with it too.

The two sticks method is the only non-obvious method. All you do is get two sturdy sticks, carefully grip your mug/pot, then move it away from the fire until it cools down enough to touch the handles (if you have handles, that is). If your mug/pot has no handles, I'd go with the other options.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: GSI pot lifter on 08/31/2011 07:01:29 MDT Print View

I think those work just fine. I have not had any issues with discomfort from steam.

Aaron Benson
(AaronMB) - F

Locale: Central Valley California
Re: GSI pot lifter on 08/31/2011 14:05:09 MDT Print View

I pack two silicone muffin cups for steam baking. They're a little thin, but doubled over, or using two doubled over, allows a quick grab of hot handles without feeling too much heat.

Edited by AaronMB on 08/31/2011 14:06:14 MDT.