Knot tying cheat sheet?
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Todd Taylor
(texasbb) - F

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: the 5 needed knots... on 08/30/2011 21:30:50 MDT Print View

I agree with Steven. Everyone needs to know just five knots. My five are different from his, but still just five. :-) Here are mine (for basic backpacking):

Clove hitch (bear hang PCT method)
Tautline hitch (adjustable guy lines and such)
Alpine butterfly (hanging stuff on a line between trees)
Sheet bend (tying two lines together)
Bowline (tying to most anything else)

So, find your five and learn to tie 'em without pictures!

Danny Korn
(d0nk3yk0n9) - F

Locale: New York
Re: Re: the 5 needed knots... on 09/01/2011 06:41:19 MDT Print View

Although I personally know many more knots and use them on a regular basis, when I'm teaching for my school's Outdoor Education department, I only teach 4 knots for backpacking:

Bowline (One end of a tarp ridgeline; attaching ropes to our bear bags, which have a loop for this purpose)

Trucker's Hitch (Tensioning tarp ridgeline and stakes)

Sheet Bend (Tying two lines together, primarily if the bear bag ropes are too short)

Tensionless Hitch (Tying off the bear bag ropes, since we don't use the PCT method)


And one of those isn't even really a knot... the tensionless hitch is literally the easiest thing I've ever taught.

Basically, as others have said, figure out what you need to do that includes knots, then find the knots that make the most sense to you for those purposes.

Antti Peltola
(anttipeltola) - F
Re: Knot tying cheat sheet? on 09/01/2011 08:52:40 MDT Print View

I would draw the cheat sheet on dry bag instead of tarp or taking cards, easier to move to the place where the help is needed than tarp, and no additional items in the kit as there is with cards.

---

I used to fish a lot with my father when I was a kid. I learnt to do the knots so that they would hold their intended use and still would be fast to open, even with cold hands, so I tend to do a slipped variant if possible.

Two ropes together: Slipknot join (or is it called slipped overhand knot join?)
Attaching a rope to a tree: Anchor hitch (slipped)
Loop at the end of the line: Figure of 8 loop
Rope to the pole: Clove hitch (can also be used to shorten then rope at the pole)
Guyline-type-of-needs: Truckers hitch (for real guylines I use linelocks, so much easier on cold/bad weather and dirty lines that I accept the small weight gain). Quite often I do also this as a slipped variant for quick release.

Edited by anttipeltola on 09/01/2011 08:53:26 MDT.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Knot tying cheat sheet? on 09/01/2011 10:15:54 MDT Print View

Antti wrote, "I would draw the cheat sheet on dry bag instead of tarp or taking cards, easier to move to the place where the help is needed than tarp, and no additional items in the kit as there is with cards."


A page back shows the AGG bandana-- perfect.

@ Todd Taylor: Alpine butterfly (hanging stuff on a line between trees)-- that is a handy knot and easy to learn. Thanks! http://www.animatedknots.com/alpinebutterfly/

Edited by dwambaugh on 09/01/2011 10:20:19 MDT.

larry savage
(pyeyo) - F

Locale: pacific northwest
cut and paste the knots you want into on 09/01/2011 14:26:06 MDT Print View

Cut and paste the knots you want into some MS application like Word and run a clear plastic sheet through the printer or take it on a flash drive down to a Kinkos or whatever.

Antti Peltola
(anttipeltola) - F
Re: Knot tying cheat sheet? on 09/01/2011 22:45:19 MDT Print View

"A page back shows the AGG bandana-- perfect."

Maybe for warmer climates, but not for me. It's cotton, so it would be nixed as I'm hiking in areas which have subarctic or tundra climates.