Forum Index » GEAR » Why are Platypus hydration bladders to popular here?


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David Vo
(sygyzy)
Why are Platypus hydration bladders to popular here? on 08/15/2011 16:45:14 MDT Print View

I am a big Camelbak fan and have invested in a number of the bladders and packs so imagine my surprise when I see that the bladder of choice on BPL are the Platypus ones. Is there a reason for this? Is it because of weight?

Thanks.

John Jensen
(JohnJ) - F

Locale: Orange County, CA
Re: Why are Platypus hydration bladders to popular here? on 08/15/2011 16:51:37 MDT Print View

I have Gregory [day, mtb] packs, which had Gregory bladders, and held up pretty well. They weren't really bad. Since I switched to the simple 2+ Liter, stand-up, Platypus types I've had an even easier time. I just use plain water, drain, and leave to dry after each use. I had one start to leak after folding ... but probably after 150 uses. It's made me an advocate.

Edited by JohnJ on 08/15/2011 16:53:34 MDT.

David Vo
(sygyzy)
Re: Re: Why are Platypus hydration bladders to popular here? on 08/15/2011 16:57:53 MDT Print View

Are you referring to the Platy Bottle or the Hoser (bladder)?

Mark Ries
(mtmnmark) - M

Locale: IOWAHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!
Platypus on 08/15/2011 17:03:32 MDT Print View

I have never had one leak and have one pushing 10 yrs my ex has one that would be 14-15 yrs I have a dromadary bag that old also but its much heavier. However I am a recent convert of the cheap old plastic water bottle. Oh and yes its because of weight

Edited by mtmnmark on 08/15/2011 17:06:17 MDT.

David Drake
(DavidDrake) - F - M

Locale: North Idaho
Re: Why are Platypus hydration bladders to popular here? on 08/15/2011 17:04:39 MDT Print View

Platys have nice weight to volume ratio, take up little space when empty, are US made with lifetime warranty, and aren't too expensive. I used to use the Hoser attachment (for hydration rig) which is also light for what it is. Gave that up for the last several trips in favor of a bottle, and doubt I'll go back.

Having said that, my current fav is a 1 liter poweraid bottle. Zero cost, not too much heavier than a platy, durable enough for several trips and easy to replace. Easier to fill in a running stream, too. I've still been carrying a platy (out of habit) but if there's plenty of water on the trail, it really only gets used partly inflated in my pillow system. So I'll prob. ditch it at some point.

My impression is, hydration systems other than platy are all way too heavy and gimmick-y.

David Vo
(sygyzy)
Re: Re: Why are Platypus hydration bladders to popular here? on 08/15/2011 17:23:19 MDT Print View

Just curious, if you don't use the Hoser (hydration bladder), and just a Platy bottle, do you just store the bottle in the pack? A 2L bottle seems like it'd take up a lot of room. I don't have one but I do own 2L Camelbak bladders and filled up, they aren't small. I assume this would not fit in a side mesh pocket in your pack. So do you stop every 20 minutes and pull the Platy bottle out to drink?

Jake Palmer
(jakep_82) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Re: Why are Platypus hydration bladders to popular here? on 08/15/2011 17:28:15 MDT Print View

A 1 liter bottle will last me half a day and fits easily in my side pocket.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: Why are Platypus hydration bladders to popular here? on 08/15/2011 17:28:49 MDT Print View

David V., I think some of us carry a Gatorade bottle of water for primary drinking. Then, if we are going to be on trail stretches that are very long and dry, we may have a 2-L Platypus for auxiliary water storage. On a recent trip, I left camp each morning with my Gatorade bottle full, plus either one or two liters in the Platypus. Once the Platypus is empty or unneeded, you can fold it up.

Since my 2-L Platypus is part of my gravity feed filter system, it is multiuse.

--B.G.--

Jennifer McFarlane
(JennyMcFarlane) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
platypus containers on 08/15/2011 17:53:10 MDT Print View

Weight, had 2 Camelbacks develop leaks on one trip (mine and my son's) plus it is easier to see if there is mold growing (had that happen on 3 different Camelbaks) and I like the convenience of a hydration bladder. I also carry a 1 liter plastic bottle for electrolyte drinks.

Chad Poindexter
(Stick) - F

Locale: Wet & Humid Southeast....
Re: Re: Re: Re: Why are Platypus hydration bladders to popular here? on 08/15/2011 18:04:06 MDT Print View

+ 1 Bob.

I used to use a 100 oz Camelbak bladder and then I realized that it was way heavy before adding water! I bought a Nalgene Cantene and it is fine, but with the wide mouth it doesn't fold down that small, plus I worry about where the bottle is attached to the mouth piece. Seems like it would fail. So, I grabbed a 2L Platy soft bottle. I love it. Packs down small and the 2L weighs less than my 1L Nalgene Cantene. Only problem is filling it. I usually carry and extra quart ziploc to scoop my water up and then pour it into the Platy to treat. As well, I use a Gatorade bottle to drink from. It attaches to the water bottle holder on my ULA Circuit's shoulder strap perfectly and is a cinch to get too. Plus, I can see how much I have left in my bottle.

David Drake
(DavidDrake) - F - M

Locale: North Idaho
Re: Re: Re: Why are Platypus hydration bladders to popular here? on 08/15/2011 18:10:50 MDT Print View

>"Just curious, if you don't use the Hoser (hydration bladder), and just a Platy bottle, do you just store the bottle in the pack? A 2L bottle seems like it'd take up a lot of room."

When I had to carry extra water recently (Hells Canyon, tough routefinding, some dry stretches) I had a biggish pack and volume wasn't an issue. Filled the platy, put it in the main pack bag. Not to be flip, but a full 2 liter platy takes up about 2 liters of pack volume, not that big a deal in a 58 liter pack (and it's a soft 2 liters as well, so conforms to space better than a hard bottle). On that trip, I carried two 2 liter platys, as they were intended to be used for a PFD to raft across the Snake River. Never had water in more than one. I'm sure 3 liters of capacity is overkill most places I hike, but at 1.3 oz for 2 liters capacity, and virtually no volume when empty, it's a hard habit to break. And they make a nice cushy pillow.

I carry my 1 liter poweraid/gatoraid bottle in a side pocket, which is easier access as well (maybe take a drink every hour, if it's not hot. Hydrate well in morning and evening and at water sources). With a 25 liter pack (which I can use for 3-4 nights now) the platy would prob. take up too much volume. I could go with a 1 liter platy "soft-bottle", and save a few tenths of an ounce over the poweraid bottle. But as I say, the hard bottle is easier to fill, basically free, and has a certain reverse snob appeal.

Edited by DavidDrake on 08/15/2011 18:12:54 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: platypus containers on 08/15/2011 18:24:23 MDT Print View

About the only time when I need to carry much more than two liters of water is when I'm in the desert, and I don't go there that often. I did a crazy dayhike in Death Valley one time (Telescope Peak, the hard way), and I started with three liters of water. By ten miles up the route, there was a known spring, so I left there with 6.5 liters of water. (Yes, do the math. That's a lot of weight.) I think I finished the hike after 17 hours on the trail with about 1 left.

If you need to reduce your water consumption in the desert, hike at night.

I've had guys go up Whitney with me, and they carried some kind of big Camelback or other big water bladder. Then it would develop a leak. They had to invert the whole thing to get the leak onto the top of the bladder, and that slows down the leak rate.

I always found it more reliable to have multiple 1-L containers. But that is just me. In the desert, I really can't afford a water container leak.

--B.G.--

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
platy on 08/15/2011 19:09:55 MDT Print View

2L platy holds 2.5L at 1.25 oz. Hard to beat that.

Ross Bleakney
(rossbleakney) - MLife

Locale: Cascades
Re: platy on 08/15/2011 21:17:45 MDT Print View

Just curious, if you don't use the Hoser (hydration bladder), and just a Platy bottle, do you just store the bottle in the pack?

I don't use a tube, but I store my platypus in the space for a bladder. It fits really well there, close to my back. Since water is really dense, it makes sense for me to carry it there.

Of course, that assumes that I'm carrying any water at all. When backpacking, I rarely do. In that case, I usually carry it on the outside, so I can quickly turn it into a hand held gravity filter. It uses less room when empty than my little inline filter (which I also carry on the outside).

I also match the amount I carry to the expected need. So a two liter bladder may only carry one liter.

John Jensen
(JohnJ) - F

Locale: Orange County, CA
Re: Re: Re: Why are Platypus hydration bladders to popular here? on 08/15/2011 21:29:28 MDT Print View

"Are you referring to the Platy Bottle or the Hoser (bladder)?"

Huh, I think models have changed. I originally got what is now the 2L "bottle" with a hose.

David Vo
(sygyzy)
Re: Re: Re: Re: Why are Platypus hydration bladders to popular here? on 08/15/2011 21:37:10 MDT Print View

I'll take your word that the models changed. I only heard about Platypus this week. But it make sense, what you're saying, because the Platy bottle looks exactly like a hydration pack sans hose.

Robert Cowman
(rcowman) - F

Locale: Canadian Rockies
Re: Re: Re: Re: Why are Platypus hydration bladders to popular here? on 08/15/2011 21:37:51 MDT Print View

camelbak bladders in canada are $45+ in MSRP. platys are $15+ MSRP... not a hard choice

Konrad .
(Konrad1013) - MLife
overbuilt on 08/15/2011 21:40:22 MDT Print View

I've owned 3 camelbak bladders but have sold/attempted to sell them all off. They were way too overbuilt and burly for their intended tasks. I once saw an advertisement where the camelbak was run over by a truck, and survived. I thought that was amazing at the time and went out and bought some. Then I realized how ridiculous the advertisement was. When would my water bladder ever be subjected to such force? There was never a single "what if" situation that could justify how overbuilt the thing was. It was just wasted weight in my mind. So now I have a platy!

But i've ditched hydration/hoser systems for the most part anways. Water bottles are just easier to monitor.

If i was a special forces operator, whose pack had to survive being dropped out of a helicopter, I would own a camelbak. But alas, I am just a a typical paper pusher who enjoys weekend hikes :D

Edited by Konrad1013 on 08/15/2011 21:43:21 MDT.

Chad Poindexter
(Stick) - F

Locale: Wet & Humid Southeast....
Re: overbuilt on 08/15/2011 21:51:39 MDT Print View

Hey Konrad, I saw that same video of the truck running over the Camelbak and thought the same thing, so I ordered one off of Amazon. Now, I don't carry it anymore, but I have kept it to loan out, or just in case I change my mind...but I don't see that happening...

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
weight n price on 08/15/2011 22:03:03 MDT Print View

platies have the advantage ...

as to leaks ... on day trips its not a huge deal ... on long trips, youd patch it up the same way as an inflatable pad ... never had a leak though on a platy ... did have one on a source

as to hoses ... it depends what you do ... but when climbing you generally dont want to take off yr pack to get at yr bottle, assuming you wear one .... if no pack then i just strap a bottle to my harness ...