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Olive oil, how to absorb
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Jim Sweeney
(swimjay) - MLife

Locale: Northern California
Olive oil, how to absorb on 08/14/2011 14:11:45 MDT Print View

I'm leaving on a 12 day cookless trip in the high Sierras this Tuesday, and welcome any suggestions. In particular, ideas on how to incorporate olive oil, as I don't think I can drink it straight, but it's wonderfully dense calorically. (One idea in the excellent 8/12 post by Sarah re tomato couscous).

Don't have time to figure out dehydration. Will be taking Mike Clelland!'s "no-bake groovy-riffic bars".

Any other ideas or references much appreciated.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Olive oil, how to absorb on 08/14/2011 14:19:43 MDT Print View

Either purchase instant Quinoa flakes, or else dehydrate your own cooked Quinoa. There isn't much to figure out, and you can do it in an oven if you choose.

Once you have instant Quinoa, you can rehydrate it on the trail with either cool or warm water. Maybe add in a little olive oil, and maybe a little soup base. Actually, some pieces of turkey summer sausage would help, also.

Take along about twelve squares of Logan Bread.

--B.G.--

Jim Sweeney
(swimjay) - MLife

Locale: Northern California
Quinoa flakes on 08/14/2011 14:23:46 MDT Print View

Thanks for a great idea, Bob. Will be bringing salami, sun dried tomatoes, parmesan, which sound like they'd go great with the quinoa and olive oil.

Logan bread is a new one to me, but I'll look it up.

Edited by swimjay on 08/14/2011 14:24:22 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Quinoa flakes on 08/14/2011 14:36:58 MDT Print View

I treat Quinoa like instant rice, but it is more nurishing than rice.

I've left the old recipe for Logan Bread here previously.

--B.G.--

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Olive oil, how to absorb on 08/14/2011 14:54:53 MDT Print View

Well...I add EVOO to nearly anything :-) You like hummus? Buy the ready to use dried mix that you can find ant many grocery stores - Fantastic Foods makes it. Add curry powder and oil, spread on tortillas!

Make "pasta salads" with ramen blocks (toss the spice packets). It rehydrates in cold water in 10-15 minutes. Add in whatever sounds good. Even topped with EVOO, Parmesan cheese and herbs/spices is good enough.

And yep, couscous can be made cold easily. Any dry soup mix by Knorr works well added as well! Unlimited ideas....

Jim Sweeney
(swimjay) - MLife

Locale: Northern California
tortillas on 08/14/2011 15:43:53 MDT Print View

Thanks, Sarah. So, do tortillas not need to be cooked or heated? Are there advantages to corn over flour, or vice versa?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: tortillas on 08/14/2011 16:16:32 MDT Print View

Corn tortillas tend to be way too brittle for me. Multigrain flour tortillas are OK. They are soft enough when fresh. Once they are a week old, they are not so soft, so heating or steaming them couldn't hurt. OTOH, I eat them cold when they are two weeks old without any prep. You will need a squeeze packet of peanut butter, though.

--B.G.--

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: tortillas on 08/14/2011 16:35:05 MDT Print View

Buy flour tortillas from the shelf, like Mission brand or similar, the bigger the brand name the better for hiking. Many have 1 month of freshness. For best storage though put the bag into a gallon freezer bag, it will keep fresher. If in a humid area you can re-pack them with pieces of parchment paper between each tortilla.
Having said that you will find raw flour tortillas that you have to cook but those are usually sold in the cold case!

PS: They are great for no cook chicken and tuna wraps as well, using the pouched meats!

Laurie Ann March
(Laurie_Ann) - F

Locale: Ontario, Canada
oils on 08/15/2011 11:14:22 MDT Print View

you can add it to any pasta, couscous or rice based dish.... another great oil for this is avocado oil... yummy

Jim Sweeney
(swimjay) - MLife

Locale: Northern California
Thanks on 08/15/2011 14:22:46 MDT Print View

Thanks for all the great ideas. I wish I'd known this was possible years sooner (when I think of all the space-hogging, 4 year old freeze dried food I've choked down, struggling to finish every wretched little bit, endlessly lugging around its abysmal packaging...)

The quinoa flakes are incredible, very delicate, quickly soft with no cooking, and delicious with golden raisins. Am sure they'll be good in a savory direction also, with olive oil, salami chunks and herbs.

The avocado oil sounds like a good idea. How stable is that if the weather is warm, compared to olive oil?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Thanks on 08/15/2011 14:50:17 MDT Print View

"The avocado oil sounds like a good idea. How stable is that if the weather is warm, compared to olive oil?"

James, the advantage of avocado and olive oils is that they are healthy fats, but they have the calorie density of bad ol' saturated fats. But I can take only a little bit per day.

I did have to use a few drops of olive oil on my last trip. I used it as a lubricant on some plastic parts of my camera tripod. I'm not sure about the calories on that one.

--B.G.--

Laurie Ann March
(Laurie_Ann) - F

Locale: Ontario, Canada
avocado oil on 08/15/2011 16:14:06 MDT Print View

Like olive oil you have to make sure it doesn't go rancid by keeping it out of the light and the extreme heat. I usually just put it in the centre of my pack and have had good luck with it in higher temps. Keep in mind high temps for me are 30-35°C.

Jim Sweeney
(swimjay) - MLife

Locale: Northern California
tripod on 08/15/2011 16:14:46 MDT Print View

Still, there is the increase in skin-out weight to think about.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: On oil shelf life on 08/15/2011 17:11:21 MDT Print View

Unless one is thru hiking or in very hot/humid temps I would not worry about oil spoiling. A week or two out is just fine - although some oils are less stable (say Walnut and others) even they are stored in less than preferable often before it is purchased.

On olive oil I am the biggest fan of oil packets - you can get organic EVOO of course this way. Your oil is tightly sealed, in a a nice mylar pouch and fresh when opened - and it is the perfect serving amount for one person. Hit up www.minimus.biz or packitgourmet for those!

PS: With the toddler I carry avocados fresh. Even before he came around I carried them. They pack better than one would think (wrap in paper towels and put in your mug or pot. Sure you have to hump out the pit and peel but it is sooooo worth it!

Monty Montana
(TarasBulba) - MLife

Locale: Rocky Mountains
New: Avocados on 08/29/2011 17:30:51 MDT Print View

Sarah, A good way to keep avocados from geeting smushed in my pack is to put them in one of those large plastic easter eggs that can be found in the stores around Easter time. They're cheap, light and sturdy and guarantee that you won't open your pack to discover green goo all over your stuff.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: New: Avocados on 08/29/2011 19:28:41 MDT Print View

Monty, I LOVE that!!!!

Tim Zen
(asdzxc57) - F

Locale: MI
Re: New: Avocados on 08/29/2011 20:12:06 MDT Print View

Do you pack out the pit and peel?

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Re: New: Avocados on 08/29/2011 21:33:12 MDT Print View

Timothy, Yes I do. For me the heart healthy fats is well worth the weight of any carry out.

Tim Zen
(asdzxc57) - F

Locale: MI
Re: Re: Re: New: Avocados on 08/30/2011 15:39:21 MDT Print View

Sorry about that. It was meant to be an exclamation, not a question.

Jim Sweeney
(swimjay) - MLife

Locale: Northern California
diet at altitude on 08/30/2011 17:10:36 MDT Print View

Thanks for everyone's ideas and comments. The trip went well, with the following observations:

Living at sea level, and hiking on the first day from 5000' to 11000', there were some altitude effects--

1) It took several days before I "felt" like drinking or eating as much as I should be. Most appealing, to eat/drink, and which I'd brought almost none of, were sugary drinks, like powdered lemonade or Gatorade. I think now that if I'd had more of those, I would also have eaten more than I wound up eating. For several days I wasn't eating more than a 1100 calories a day, and wound up losing about 10 lbs. (Starting weight ~170). (This was measured after drinking several bottles of various drinks as soon as I got back to civilization, so couldn't have been all water loss)

2) Salami always tasted good. A little more hassle, but also good, were crunched up corn chips, followed by wheat thins. For a prepared meal, reconstituted hummus powder with dried parsley and as much olive and/or avocado oil as it could absorb, on a tortilla, was appealing. Not very appealing, for some reason, were the myriad kinds of nuts I'd brought along, though I eat/enjoy a lot of nuts at home. The most successful nuts were pistachios and cashews, followed by almonds, pecans, and very distantly, walnuts. Of dried fruits, Trader Joe's "Just Mango" was a favorite, with, surprising to me, dried cherries and and Sultana raisins less so. Though I'd had a good trial experience with quinoa flakes at home, it was a bit of an effort to eat them on the trail, whether sweet as a cereal (with Sultana raisins and powdered milk) or savory (with olive oil and dried parsley). Chocolate was appealing, but in small doses.

3) Things I wish I'd taken: sugary drinks, powdered tomato to flavor the hummus and supply vitamin C, more tortillas, marmalade, pine nuts.

I think in summary that for several days my body wanted the simplest carbohydrates possible, though surprisingly it seemed to appreciate the salt and fat of the salami.