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William Zila
(Ultralightwillinn.m) - MLife

Locale: Albuquerque
Xul/sul shelters on 08/02/2011 13:51:10 MDT Print View

So I'm looking for a shelter to improve my xul/sul kit. Cutrently I'm using a equinox poncho tarp. I'm complelty happy with it in a half pyramid for shelter mode. The promblem is I really am not a poncho guy I'd rather hike with nothing soaking wet then a poncho just not my thing. So at 8.5 ounces with stakes and guylines for the poncho tarp going to a shelter I can do anything under 6ouces since my windshirt weighs 2.3. I understand this leaves me with no "rain gear". But my xul kit Is for above freezing and I won't put on a rain Jacket when hiking if it's above 30 anyway. I will just use a windshirt. Also keep in mind that my home turf is new Mexico we very rarely get days of sustained rain just showers. So what shelter options are there that are under 6 ounces with stakes "terra nova 2gram titanium's" and guylines? So far I can just think of large cuben flat of cat cut tarps. Any more enclosed shelters? I would like room for two in a pinch. Thanks for any insight on this

j lan
(justaddfuel) - F

Locale: MN
Re: Xul/sul shelters on 08/02/2011 14:56:56 MDT Print View

I think you could do that with the Zpacks hexamid twin tarp at
4.9 Ounces for the shelter
0.4 Ounces for 6 stakes
?.? Ounces for fishing line guylines?

Close anyway.

William Zila
(Ultralightwillinn.m) - MLife

Locale: Albuquerque
Looks good on 08/02/2011 17:00:35 MDT Print View

The heximid is high on my list any others ?

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
MLD on 08/02/2011 17:27:26 MDT Print View

MLD has a couple of tarp offerings in cuben, one is a "SUL" @ 3.5 oz :)

john chong
(johnch) - F
Let's re-visit this thread on 09/11/2011 12:00:01 MDT Print View

What do you, SUL people, use as your lightest shelter? w/ or w/out bivy?

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
Re: Let's re-visit this thread on 09/11/2011 13:22:38 MDT Print View

I use a poncho-tarp w/ bivy- tough to beat having rain gear do double duty as a shelter- mine is sil weighing just under 8 oz, cuben you'd be sub 5 oz

the bivy adds a few degrees to the sleep system, as well as thwarts bugs- no need for a ground cloth either

john chong
(johnch) - F
re: poncho tarp on 09/11/2011 13:29:04 MDT Print View

What do you use as a shell?

I originally used a poncho tarp and brought along my windshirt, but realized that for 2oz more, I can just bring a driducks jacket to use as a windshirt.

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
"Xul/sul shelters"- MLD Monk on 09/11/2011 13:37:14 MDT Print View

John,

My lightest shelter is the MLD Monk tarp, sub 6 oz. It's neither expensive, nor complicated, has numerous pitching options, a simple ultralight covering. The coverage for me at 6' isn't a lot, but sufficient without a bivy under fair/moderate weather conditions.

john chong
(johnch) - F
re: monk on 09/11/2011 13:44:08 MDT Print View

I was looking at that and the grace solo.

I think I want to go more for the grace solo, since it's lighter and I believe it's the same size as oware's cattarp1.5, and bpl's stealth nano tarp.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
shell on 09/11/2011 13:50:33 MDT Print View

I always bring a windshirt- it's probably my versatile piece of clothing so it comes regardless; I often wear my windshirt hiking up high- breathability is outstanding- that's not the case w/ dri-ducks or even E-Vent, also serves as bug bite stopper, layer over insulation at camp, light rain/snow shell and have even used it as part of my sleep system- I'll find other places to shed weight :)

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
"Xul/sul shelters" on 09/11/2011 14:08:06 MDT Print View

John,

The MLD Grace Solo is an excellent tarp, and yes, it's close in coverage to the BPL Nano and Oware Cattarp 1.5. I had the Grace Solo Plus in Spinnaker a while back, it was large enough for two people and gear, I also had the Oware Cattarp 1.5 for a brief time before the Grace and the coverage was identical just a few ounces heavier due to it being silnylon. The Grace is substantially roomier than the Monk, though not as versatile, all depends on what you're doing, where you'll be hiking, experience, and your preference in shelter.

john chong
(johnch) - F
re: monk on 09/11/2011 16:10:02 MDT Print View

Eugene, I just looked at the monk again, and MLD is offering it at around 9x4 for cuben. What's your monk's dimension? I'm assuming you have the silnylon one. Don't know if the cuben monk will work for me without a bivy.

I do A frame pitches 90% of the time.

Any other shelters that people use for SUL?

To get to XUL, I think we would have to drop the bivy.

Ryan Smith
(ViolentGreen) - M

Locale: Southeast
sul on 09/11/2011 18:21:21 MDT Print View

Think a Hexamid or a small cuben tarp will be the only chance at 6oz with guylines & stakes included. I use a 9x7 cuben tarp w/ guylines and CF stakes, comes in at 8.2 ounces. .51 oz cuben would have got it at about the 6 oz mark though.

Ryan

Edited by ViolentGreen on 09/11/2011 18:21:53 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: "Xul/sul shelters" on 09/11/2011 18:39:09 MDT Print View

"Any other shelters that people use for SUL?"

This certainly is no fancy solution. In my early backpacking days, I observed an experienced backpacker who kept shelter very simple. He had a plastic sheet tarp and a cord. He tied the cord between two trees, put the plastic sheet over it, held down the corners to the ground with rocks, and he was done for well under one pound.

When I started ultralight trips, I purchased the smallest and thinnest plastic painter's drop cloth. The really flimsy ones weigh about 2 oz and will fit into a shirt pocket. That goes over a very thin cord between two trees, and it works. It won't stand up to any serious wind, but it will keep rain off if the rain is vertical. If I went above timberline with it, I had a problem.

If I got really fancy, I would put a space blanket underneath it to protect against wet ground.

--B.G.--

Dan Durston
(dandydan)

Locale: Cascadia
Shelters on 09/11/2011 22:16:04 MDT Print View

I prefer to use a small net tent under a tarp rather than a bivy or single wall tent. This gives you some space to live, unlike a bivy. This is really appreciated if you ever have to wait out a storm, or if you just want to head to bed a bit early and read for a bit. Single wall tents like the Hexamid are nice, but I prefer to keep double wall protection from condensation, as I often get pretty heavy condensation where I hike.

I'm personally using a HMG Echo I shelter, which weighs a heavy 24oz all in (tarp, beak, inner, stakes, guylines) but if you're heading out for a SUL trip you can easily ditch the beak (3.5oz) and the inner can go when bugs aren't a concern (-11oz) or if you are trying to go sul (sleep with a headnet instead). The inner is really what is heavy and there are lighter options because HMG reinforces and beefs everything up quite a bit....which is nice.

A nice option would be a MLD Serenity shelter (6.2oz) under a tarp (ie. MLD Grace Solo) or a shaped tarp (ie. MLD Patrol Shelter, 6.8oz). The Patrol shelter + Serenity shelter is a particularly nice combo because you get the beaks on the tarp for a little extra protection.