Forum Index » Editor's Roundtable » Lightweight Frameless Backpacks State of the Market Report 2011: Part 4 – Packs for Lightweight Backpacking and Load Hauling


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Addie Bedford
(addiebedford) - MLife

Locale: Montana
Lightweight Frameless Backpacks State of the Market Report 2011: Part 4 – Packs for Lightweight Backpacking and Load Hauling on 07/26/2011 16:03:32 MDT Print View

Companion forum thread to:

Lightweight Frameless Backpacks State of the Market Report 2011: Part 4 – Packs for Lightweight Backpacking and Load Hauling

Doug Johnson
(djohnson) - MLife

Locale: Washington State
Re: Lightweight Frameless Backpacks State of the Market Report 2011: Part 4 – Packs for Lightweight Backpacking and Load Hauling on 07/26/2011 22:05:34 MDT Print View

This is an excellent series Will. Very thorough and informative. Thank you!

Jay Wilkerson
(Creachen) - MLife

Locale: East Bay
Part 4- Packs for Lightweight Backpacking and Load Hauling on 07/26/2011 22:27:24 MDT Print View

Great stuff Will! I really appreciate the detailed information.

Edited by Creachen on 07/26/2011 22:28:16 MDT.

Jacob Wallace
(jacobw)
Making a decision on 07/27/2011 05:43:04 MDT Print View

So, I'm a bit torn. I currently carry an Osprey Aether 60, but don't find it hugely comfortable and am keen to drop some weight from the pack.

My current total weight including food for 3 days, 1.5 L of water, and a 2 person tent (as I ususally go with the GF) is in the vicinity of 25 pounds.

The volume is close to right with the aether, but I'm progressively lightening and feel as though I could reduce volume a bit.

I like panel loaders a lot, as I travel frequently, but the weight and flexibility penalties witht the traveller seem a little high. As an aside...I really don't understand why we can't have a proper light weight panel loader with good compression.

Should I go with something like a Mariposa Plus from the SUL round-up and work at getting my volume down a touch? Or am I kidding myself at current weight / volume?

Diane Pinkers
(dipink) - M

Locale: Western Washington
Aether swap on 07/27/2011 12:09:10 MDT Print View

Jacob, I carried the women's version of the Aether, the Ariel 60. I swapped it out for a Six Moons Designs Traveler, and haven't been sorry at all. If you think you're likely to make major volume reductions in your gear in the next few years, then you may want something smaller, but I've been really happy to lose 3 pounds of weight just by switching packs. I've found the volume to work just fine with the Traveler. As I get towards the end of a trip, then the compression comes into play, but I haven't found that the lack of perfect compression mentioned by Will has made a huge difference in the carrying. The adjustable torso and the huge hipbelt pockets (lots of snacks as I go along, don't have to stop!) have been great. If I had to make any changes, I'd think about a thin sleeve on the underside of the lid pocket that could be snapped or velcroed into place, where my bladder could ride. When I have a lighter load, and my bladder is getting less than half full, it folds up and I have to tilt my bag sometimes to get water to flow. Haven't had to actually stop and pull things open and rearrange to fix it, though.

Jacob Wallace
(jacobw)
Re: Aether swap on 07/28/2011 01:17:24 MDT Print View

Thanks Diane, really useful. Do you carry a closed cell foam pad to make the suspension work for you...or are you using an inflatable?

I've got a small neoair which might not be that useful for suspension, based on Will's review.

Currently I use my Aether as my pad for the lower leg area, which works reasonably well. I guess I could add a small sit pad or similar to the traveller for a similar effect, but would it be any use for suspension?

Bob Bankhead
(wandering_bob) - MLife

Locale: Oregon, USA
Re: Part 4- Packs for Lightweight Backpacking and Load Hauling on 07/28/2011 19:39:07 MDT Print View

Surprisingly not mentioned in the report is the fact that, like the Six Moon Designs Starlight, the SMD Traveler also has an adjustable harness system to accomodate a variety of torso lengths.

I've carried mine on the PCT, JMT, and CT for several years. With the stays in place, it can handle 30 pounds for several days. The wife and I have a pair of them; her toso is 15" while mine is closer to 19".

Edited by wandering_bob on 07/28/2011 19:40:20 MDT.

scott Nelson
(nlsscott) - MLife

Locale: So. Calif.
Aquilo tested with ccf pad? on 07/28/2011 22:44:55 MDT Print View

I am wondering if these great load carrying results for the Aquilo were done with or without a folded ccf pad in the pack's pad pocket?

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
circuit? on 08/05/2011 18:31:56 MDT Print View

would have liked to have seen the ULA circuit included.

Edited by livingontheroad on 08/05/2011 18:33:21 MDT.