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Andrew Bishop
(copperhead) - M

Locale: Down Under
Trekking pole antishock on 07/15/2011 17:10:45 MDT Print View

I love my bamboo staff. It's light and strong. I have added a wrist strap and a camera mount.

A missing feature I would like is an antishock system, as I find I get sore wrists towards the end of a day's walking.

Any engineering types out there with thoughts on how I could add antishock to my bamboo pole?

Pilate de Guerre
(deGuerre) - F

Locale: SE, USA
Not an engineer on 07/16/2011 13:55:30 MDT Print View

I'm no engineer, but maybe adding some foam to wherever your grip the bamboo would help? Also, maybe some grippy rubber to the bottom?

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Not an engineer on 07/16/2011 13:58:03 MDT Print View

Connect your wrist strap to the staff via a loop of shock cord.

Edited by greg23 on 07/16/2011 14:00:40 MDT.

Jeffs Eleven
(WoodenWizard) - F

Locale: Greater Mt Tabor
Re: Re: Not an engineer on 07/16/2011 19:22:16 MDT Print View

Both of these ideas seem like champs to me. I was thinking put grips on em, and Gregs idea seems very elegant, also.

Personally I don't like antishock (as a mechanism) it feels like you're sticking your poles in mud.

I'd be willing to bet that with grips, shock cord strap, and the natural flex, they would be comfy.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Trekking pole antishock on 07/16/2011 19:40:37 MDT Print View

Show us a photo of how you are using the wrist strap. Are you really slamming the pole into the ground? I swing it with a flick of my wrist and land fairly soft on it. Never had a problem.

Slip on bicycle foam grips would be interesting. Anti-shock sucks, IMHO. Most antishock mechanisms are some sort of spring loaded plunger, so you need an independent column somewhere in the line.

I made a bamboo pole that had a broken pole tip silicone-glued into the hollow end. That allowed using pole baskets too. Worked pretty good and had a nice blended organic/high tech look. It wasn't any lighter than a typical telescoping stick :(

Jason Brinkman
(jbrinkmanboi) - MLife

Locale: Idaho
Re: Trekking pole antishock on 07/16/2011 23:38:35 MDT Print View

Why would you want to mess up perfectly good bamboo poles with squeaky, heavy, ineffective technology?

Tape your wrists. Or stop doing it that way.

From an engineer.

Andrew Bishop
(copperhead) - M

Locale: Down Under
Antishock to my bamboo staff on 07/26/2011 04:44:50 MDT Print View

Thanks for the responses, guys and apologies for the slow reply on my part.

Greg and Pilate - I will def. give those suggestions a go.

Jason - if I had to start taping my wrists to reduce pain/inflammation, I reckon I would have to use another pole

Dale - I don't think I'm a slammer. :)

I have attached a photo of the staff as-is.Bamboo staff

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Antishock to my bamboo staff on 07/26/2011 06:22:13 MDT Print View

That pole looks too short for you. Could that be the cause of your discomfort?

Andrew Bishop
(copperhead) - M

Locale: Down Under
Staff too short? on 07/26/2011 06:37:00 MDT Print View

Is the pole too short? Well, I'm 5' 11" and the pole is 44"

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Staff too short? on 07/26/2011 06:55:20 MDT Print View

Maybe. I'm 6'3" and use 51" (130cm) poles. Do you have to bend your wrist to use that pole?

Andrew Bishop
(copperhead) - M

Locale: Down Under
Short staff on 07/26/2011 07:26:58 MDT Print View

Hi Ken

Yes, I have a slight bend in my wrist. My forearm is at slight decline from the horizontal.

Hmmm..might have to find a longer piece of bamboo!

Cheers
Andrew

peter vacco
(fluff@inreach.com) - M

Locale: no. california
about poles.. babble. on 07/26/2011 07:56:14 MDT Print View

real quick here ...

if on an uphill, the poles tends to flare outwards when you are getting tired, they are too long.
don't shove all five fingers thru the wrist strap, leave out the thumb. that way, when it gets jammed in a rock/crack, and it will , you can let it trail behind and it will auto-disconnect.

if you can get the grip/strap combo worked out optimally, you really won't have to hold on very much.

cheers,
off to HIKE ! (lost coast)

peter v.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Staff too short? on 07/26/2011 09:10:08 MDT Print View

Yeah, it's too short. Your forearm should be about level in that pose. I'm 5'10" and my single staff is set at 49" from tip to strap mounting. For downhill travel a little longer is good. I tend to go a little longer with a single staff too.

Also, A wrist strap that gives some support will take the load off your forearm muscles and hands. It is easy enough to tie a tubular webbing loop in a Prusik hitch. Your hand can go through with the webbing in your palm as you would do when cross-country skiing. With that, moving the pole forward is just a flick, and your weight comes down on the strap and doesn't require a tight grip. For the loop and Prusik hitch plus some extra, your staff will need to be another 8" or so longer.

I would concoct a cover for the camera screw. If you fall on that, it won't be pretty!

Andrew Bishop
(copperhead) - M

Locale: Down Under
Short staff on 07/26/2011 17:20:19 MDT Print View

Thanks, comments appreciated

mike mazzarella
(mazz1111) - F

Locale: WNC
+1 for too short! on 07/26/2011 18:20:28 MDT Print View

+1 on the too short post...

A little length (maybe 4-6") above the wrist would act as COUNTER WEIGHT when pivoting the pole ...less stress on the wrist

Pilate de Guerre
(deGuerre) - F

Locale: SE, USA
Diameter and weight? on 07/26/2011 20:08:10 MDT Print View

Andrew,

What is the external diameter of your pole at the tip and at the "handle"? What is the weight?

I'm curious because I just found out there is a grove of bamboo behind a local park and would like to give making one a go. How did you dry the bamboo? I don't want to leave it out baking in the sun incase that might split it or crack it, but whatever you did looks great.

Thanks.

Andrew Bishop
(copperhead) - M

Locale: Down Under
Trekking staff details on 08/04/2011 04:55:15 MDT Print View

Hi Pilate

Sorry for the delay in getting back to you.

The bamboo staff weighs 310 gms. The circumference at the top is 80mm (with a couple of ridges where there are knots) and at the bottom is 72mm.

It was cut when already someone dried out and it was another 18 months before I made it into a staff. (It may have been okay to use it for a staff earlier, but I wasn't interested in staff making at that time!)

Cheers
Andrew

Mat Tallman
(wehtaM) - F

Locale: Midwest
another thought on 08/04/2011 19:14:58 MDT Print View

The diameter of the pole seems a little small, I know for me that just gripping such a thin pole would result in wrist fatigue.

+1 for wanting to see how you position the straps (if any) while walking. In the event that you use no straps, then I'd definitely blame the wrist pain on the small diameter.

Andrew Bishop
(copperhead) - M

Locale: Down Under
Short - and skinny- staff on 08/05/2011 01:50:39 MDT Print View

Actually I only use the straps to stop me losing the staff when crossing rivers!

So, I am now looking for a longer and thicker length of bamboo, to which I will attach a decent strap, which I will use properly! Phew!

Thanks guys