Forum Index » Gear Lists » Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic 2011 Gear List


Display Avatars Sort By:
David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic 2011 Gear List on 06/15/2011 10:38:16 MDT Print View

In the profile. First draft of what I plan to race with this summer.

For the uninitiated, this is the same race and course that Skurka wrote about here: http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/race_report_2009_amwc.html

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic 2011 Gear List on 06/15/2011 12:10:03 MDT Print View

Looks great Dave. My eyes are not as good as they used to be but I can't see any shelter on the list...

Chris W
(simplespirit) - MLife

Locale: WNC
Re: Re: Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic 2011 Gear List on 06/15/2011 12:13:53 MDT Print View

Technically his Yak is a shelter. Of course, he may not plan on sleeping either.

:-)

Edited by simplespirit on 06/15/2011 12:20:46 MDT.

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: Re: Re: Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic 2011 Gear List on 06/15/2011 12:23:19 MDT Print View

You know...I thought about that....

Sam Haraldson
(sharalds) - MLife

Locale: Gallatin Range
Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic 2011 Gear List on 06/15/2011 12:40:54 MDT Print View

AMK Heatsheets bivy looks to be the shelter. Dave, define "pile hoody" - is that a synth puffy or a fleece?

Robert Cowman
(rcowman) - F

Locale: Canadian Rockies
Re: Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic 2011 Gear List on 06/15/2011 12:42:27 MDT Print View

my guess is fleece because it would breath better while hiking at night. My guess is something like an R1

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: Re: Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic 2011 Gear List on 06/15/2011 12:50:51 MDT Print View

"AMK Heatsheets bivy looks to be the shelter"

Hardcore.

Sam Haraldson
(sharalds) - MLife

Locale: Gallatin Range
Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic 2011 Gear List on 06/15/2011 12:53:21 MDT Print View

Torso insulation:

base short sleeve
base long sleeve
pile hoody
Spektr smock

If the pile hoody is an R1 (or similar) as I'm lead to believe given that is usually what "pile" means in the backpacking world I'm hesitant to think this is enough insulation.

I wouldn't personally be able to sit around using that stove or catching a nap without a puffy jacket but Dave has been known to "get 'er done" and probably has a good idea of what he needs.

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
AMWC list on 06/15/2011 14:22:33 MDT Print View

I plan to catch some naps during the race, as needed during the day and around the fire at night. Heatsheets bivy works to keep rain and wind off, heat in, and if it melts a bit I don't care.

The pile hoody is a heavily modified Patagonia R3 pullover from ~2004. Big, shaggy, and green. Very warm for the weight. I've added a hood of red R2 fabric, and cut the sleeves a bit short so that they don't wick water when my wrists get wet from packrafting. It's warm enough for rocky mountain three season use.

Andy F
(AndyF) - M

Locale: Midwest/Midatlantic
Re: Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic 2011 Gear List on 06/15/2011 15:18:31 MDT Print View

Not that I have any experience with a race, but I think I'd probably drop the idea of hot food entirely to save weight and time.

Are you bringing a head net and bug lotion?

Sounds awesome. Good luck!

Edited by AndyF on 06/15/2011 15:19:08 MDT.

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
hot food on 06/15/2011 15:45:21 MDT Print View

It's tempting Andy, I would save a pound. I'd prefer to get this list under 20.

Probably a good idea to bring a headnet, though.

The reason for hot food is that, beyond the calories/oz being favorable and the boost to morale, it's the best way to get the core temp back up after shivering in a packraft for a few hours.

Stopping to cook is actually faster in the long run, IMO Skurka et al would've gone faster with more rest and sleep. In 2009 Roman and Forrest finished in second by 15 hours, but claimed to've had 28 hours of camp time (18 hours asleep). Feet end up being the limiting factor rather than hours available.

I might drop the canister stove and instead bring an alcohol rig, which would still be pretty fast and 1/4 the weight.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic 2011 Gear List on 06/15/2011 16:59:31 MDT Print View

I'd love to get in on this race someday...

Very anxious to hear how this goes for you, what gear works out, etc.

Keep us posted.

Jay Cable
(spruceboy) - F
hydropel or some other foot lube of some sort on 06/15/2011 23:33:57 MDT Print View

If it was me I would add some hydropel, sportslick or some other foot lube/ maceration slower. I would leave the light - its never going to be dark enough to use it. I would expect there should be enough firewood for warming/cooking fires if you want to leave out the stove and fuel. Depending on where you want to sleep and how bug tolerant you are you might want a bug headnet, though I am sure you could pull something over your head and make due.

Good luck and have type some type 2 (3?) fun!

Marco A. Sánchez
(marcoasn) - M

Locale: The fabulous Pyrenees
Re: hot food on 06/16/2011 09:13:24 MDT Print View

+1 for hot food.

As indicated, its easier to achieve a higher caloric density with hot food because you rehydratate it just before eating.

The AMWC lasts for several days so, as Dave points out, some body recovery is needed to perform well. You can think about the time spent cooking as part of this recovery time.

I also drop the canister in favor of an alcohol stove or even an Esbit one. Yes, its slower, but you can do your camp chores while the stove is running.

Cheers

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
re: re: hot food on 06/16/2011 17:57:26 MDT Print View

Ti wing stove might not be a bad idea either.

Body Glide, tape, and ibu and tylenol are all part of the (body) repair kit.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: re: re: hot food on 06/16/2011 18:54:11 MDT Print View

If you are going to be doing a fire, why not a BushBuddy?

Sam Haraldson
(sharalds) - MLife

Locale: Gallatin Range
Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic 2011 Gear List on 06/17/2011 08:11:30 MDT Print View

Simplicity is key in this sort of event. The ability to turn the wire on the Pocket Rocket, put a lighter (or spark) to it, set the pot on and have hot water a couple minutes later will be necessary in the 11th hour (or should I say 47th hour) when your body is operating on nothing more than adrenaline and caffeine. The ability to still light a fire for safety and warmth in those final hours is necessary as well but the time that one does that will not necessarily overlap with the time when one needs a hot meal, a hot drink, or a mug of java.

It should be noted I've not done an adventure race. My most badass trip was a 60 mile weekend trip during which I bivied and slept seven or eight hours. I have done exhaustive research into the AMWC and the Arrowhead 135 races and feel I can comment with at least a well-informed opinion.

Russ Porter
(Russp17)

Locale: Anchorage
stove on 06/17/2011 10:42:05 MDT Print View

I agree with Sam. If you are going to bring a stove go with a canister stove. It will be much quicker to operate and time is imporant. If you are only sleeping 2 hours why waste an extra 10 minutes of possible sleep time messing with a stove.

Hey Dave which route are you planning on taking?

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
stove and route on 06/17/2011 13:47:11 MDT Print View

Did some stove testing last night. Pocket rocket wins over alcohol and especially esbit (2.5 v. 6.5 v. 11 minutes to boil 20 oz) and is thus going.

Route is top secret!